• We carried out targeted ALMA observations of 129 fields in the COSMOS region at 1.25 mm, detecting 152 galaxies at S/N$\geq$5 with an average continuum RMS of 150 $\mu$Jy. These fields represent a S/N-limited sample of AzTEC / ASTE sources with 1.1 mm S/N$\geq$4 over an area of 0.72 square degrees. Given ALMA's fine resolution and the exceptional spectroscopic and multiwavelength photometric data available in COSMOS, this survey allows us unprecedented power in identifying submillimeter galaxy counterparts and determining their redshifts through spectroscopic or photometric means. In addition to 30 sources with prior spectroscopic redshifts, we identified redshifts for 113 galaxies through photometric methods and an additional nine sources with lower limits, which allowed a statistically robust determination of the redshift distribution. We have resolved 33 AzTEC sources into multi-component systems and our redshifts suggest that nine are likely to be physically associated. Our overall redshift distribution peaks at $z\sim$2.0 with a high redshift tail skewing the median redshift to $\tilde{z}$=2.48$\pm$0.05. We find that brighter millimeter sources are preferentially found at higher redshifts. Our faintest sources, with S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$<1.25 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=2.18$\pm$0.09, while the brightest sources, S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$>1.8 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=3.08$\pm$0.17. After accounting for spectral energy distribution shape and selection effects these results are consistent with several previous submillimeter galaxy surveys, and moreover, support the conclusion that the submillimeter galaxy redshift distribution is sensitive to survey depth.
  • Narrowband imaging is a highly successful approach for finding large numbers of high redshift Lya emitting galaxies (LAEs) up to z~6.6. However, at z>~7 there are as yet only 3 narrowband selected LAEs with spectroscopic confirmations (two at z~6.9-7.0, one at z~7.3), which hinders extensive studies on cosmic reionization and galaxy evolution at this key epoch. We have selected 23 candidate z~6.9 LAEs in COSMOS field with the large area narrowband survey LAGER (Lyman-Alpha Galaxies at the End of Reionization). In this work we present spectroscopic followup observations of 12 candidates using IMACS on Magellan. For 9 of these, the observations are sufficiently deep to detect the expected lines. Lya emission lines are identified in six sources (yielding a success rate of 2/3), including 3 luminous LAEs with Lya luminosities of L(Lya) ~ 10^{43.5} erg/s, the highest among known spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at >~7.0. This triples the sample size of spectroscopically confirmed narrowband selected LAEs at z>~7, and confirms the bright end bump in the Lya luminosity function we previously derived based on the photometric sample, supporting a patchy reionization scenario. Two luminous LAEs appear physically linked with projected distance of 1.1 pMpc and velocity difference of ~ 170 km/s. They likely sit in a common ionized bubble produced by themselves or with close neighbors, which reduces the IGM attenuation of Lya. A tentative narrow NV${\lambda}$1240 line is seen in one source, hinting at activity of a central massive black hole with metal rich line emitting gas.
  • We determine the physical properties of a sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at the observed wavelength of $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.1$ mm, and followed up at $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm with ALMA. We used MAGPHYS to fit the panchromatic (ultraviolet to radio) SEDs of 124 of the target SMGs, 19.4% of which are spectroscopically confirmed. The SED analysis was complemented by estimating the gas masses of the SMGs by using the $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm emission as a tracer of the molecular gas. The sample median and 16th-84th percentile ranges of the stellar masses, SFRs, dust temperatures, and dust and gas masses were derived to be $\log(M_{\star}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.09^{+0.41}_{-0.53}$, ${\rm SFR}=402^{+661}_{-233}$ ${\rm M}_{\odot}~{\rm yr}^{-1}$, $T_{\rm dust}=39.7^{+9.7}_{-7.4}$ K, $\log(M_{\rm dust}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=9.01^{+0.20}_{-0.31}$, and $\log(M_{\rm gas}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.34^{+0.20}_{-0.23}$, respectively. The median gas-to-dust ratio and gas fraction were found to be $120^{+73}_{-30}$ and $0.62^{+0.27}_{-0.23}$, respectively. We found that 57.3% of our SMGs populate the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, while 41.9% of the sources lie above the MS by a factor of >3 (one source lies below the MS). The largest 3 GHz radio sizes are found among the MS sources. Those SMGs that appear irregular in the rest-frame UV are predominantly starbursts, while the MS SMGs are mostly disk-like. The larger radio-emitting sizes of the MS SMGs compared to starbursts is a likely indication of their more widespread, less intense star formation. The irregular UV morphologies of the starburst SMGs are likely to echo their merger nature. Our results suggest that the transition from high-$z$ SMGs to local ellipticals via compact, quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at $z \sim 2$ might not be universal, and the latter population might also descend from the so-called blue nuggets.
  • We present the first results from the ongoing LAGER project (Lyman Alpha Galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization), which is the largest narrowband survey for $z \sim$ 7 galaxies to date. Using a specially built narrowband filter NB964 for the superb large-area Dark-Energy Camera (DECam) on the NOAO/CTIO 4m Blanco telescope, LAGER has collected 34 hours NB964 narrowband imaging data in the 3 deg$^2$ COSMOS field. We have identified 23 Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) candidates at $z$ = 6.9 in the central 2-deg$^2$ region, where DECam and public COSMOS multi-band images exist. The resulting luminosity function can be described as a Schechter function modified by a significant excess at the bright end (4 galaxies with $L_{Ly\alpha} \sim $ 10$^{43.4\pm0.2}$ erg s$^{-1}$). The number density at $L_{Ly\alpha}\sim$ 10$^{43.4\pm0.2}$ erg s$^{-1}$ is little changed from z= 6.6, while at fainter $L_{Ly\alpha}$ it is substantially reduced. Overall, we see a fourfold reduction in Ly$\alpha$ luminosity density from $z$ = 5.7 to 6.9. Combined with a more modest evolution of the continuum UV luminosity density, this suggests a factor of $\sim 3$ suppression of Ly$\alpha$ by radiative transfer through the $z \sim$ 7 intergalactic medium (IGM). It indicates an IGM neutral fraction $x_{HI}$ $\sim$ 0.4--0.6 (assuming Ly$\alpha$ velocity offsets of 100-200 km s$^{-1}$). The changing shape of the Ly$\alpha$ luminosity function between $z\lesssim 6.6$ and $z=6.9$ supports the hypothesis of ionized bubbles in a patchy reionization at $z\sim$ 7.
  • We determine the radio size distribution of a large sample of 152 SMGs in COSMOS that were detected with ALMA at 1.3 mm. For this purpose, we used the observations taken by the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project. One hundred and fifteen of the 152 target SMGs were found to have a 3 GHz counterpart. The median value of the major axis FWHM at 3 GHz is derived to be $4.6\pm0.4$ kpc. The radio sizes show no evolutionary trend with redshift, or difference between different galaxy morphologies. We also derived the spectral indices between 1.4 and 3 GHz, and 3 GHz brightness temperatures for the sources, and the median values were found to be $\alpha=-0.67$ and $T_{\rm B}=12.6\pm2$ K. Three of the target SMGs, which are also detected with the VLBA, show clearly higher brightness temperatures than the typical values. Although the observed radio emission appears to be predominantly powered by star formation and supernova activity, our results provide a strong indication of the presence of an AGN in the VLBA and X-ray-detected SMG AzTEC/C61. The median radio-emitting size we have derived is 1.5-3 times larger than the typical FIR dust-emitting sizes of SMGs, but similar to that of the SMGs' molecular gas component traced through mid-$J$ line emission of CO. The physical conditions of SMGs probably render the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons inefficient, and hence an unlikely process to lead to the observed extended radio sizes. Instead, our results point towards a scenario where SMGs are driven by galaxy interactions and mergers. Besides triggering vigorous starbursts, galaxy collisions can also pull out the magnetised fluids from the interacting disks, and give rise to a taffy-like synchrotron-emitting bridge. This provides an explanation for the spatially extended radio emission of SMGs, and can also cause a deviation from the well-known IR-radio correlation.
  • We study how to measure the galaxy merger rate from the observed close pair count. Using a high-resolution N-body/SPH cosmological simulation, we find an accurate scaling relation between galaxy pair counts and merger rates down to a stellar mass ratio of about 1:30. The relation explicitly accounts for the dependence on redshift (or time), on pair separation, and on mass of the two galaxies in a pair. With this relation, one can easily obtain the mean merger timescale for a close pair of galaxies. The use of virial masses, instead of stellar masses, is motivated by the fact that the dynamical friction time scale is mainly determined by the dark matter surrounding central and satellite galaxies. This fact can also minimize the error induced by uncertainties in modeling star formation in the simulation. Since the virial mass can be read from the well-established relation between the virial masses and the stellar masses in observation, our scaling relation can be easily applied to observations to obtain the merger rate and merger time scale. For major merger pairs (1:1-1:4) of galaxies above a stellar mass of 4*10^10 M_sun/h at z=0.1, it takes about 0.31 Gyr to merge for pairs within a projected distance of 20 kpc/h with stellar mass ratio of 1:1, while the time taken goes up to 1.6 Gyr for mergers with stellar mass ratio of 1:4. Our results indicate that a single timescale usually used in literature is not accurate to describe mergers with the stellar mass ratio spanning even a narrow range from 1:1 to 1:4.
  • We investigate the radial number density profile and the abundance distribution of faint satellites around central galaxies in the low redshift universe using the CFHT Legacy Survey. We consider three samples of central galaxies with magnitudes of M_r=-21, -22, and -23 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) group catalog of Yang et al.. The satellite distribution around these central galaxies is obtained by cross-correlating these galaxies with the photometric catalogue of the CFHT Legacy Survey. The projected radial number density of the satellites obeys a power law form with the best-fit logarithmic slope of -1.05, independent of both the central galaxy luminosity and the satellite luminosity. The projected cross correlation function between central and satellite galaxies exhibits a non-monotonic trend with satellite luminosity. It is most pronounced for central galaxies with M_r=-21, where the decreasing trend of clustering amplitude with satellite luminosity is reversed when satellites are fainter than central galaxies by more than 2 magnitudes. A comparison with the satellite luminosity functions in the Milky Way and M31 shows that the Milky Way/M31 system has about twice as many satellites as around a typical central galaxy of similar luminosity. The implications for theoretical models are briefly discussed.