• We report ALMA long-baseline observations of Orion Source I (SrcI) with resolution 0.03-0.06" (12-24 AU) at 1.3 and 3.2 mm. We detect both continuum and spectral line emission from SrcI's disk. We also detect a central weakly resolved source that we interpret as a hot spot in the inner disk, which may indicate the presence of a binary system. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of these observations allow us to measure the outer envelope of the rotation curve of the H$_2$O $5_{5,0}-6_{4,3}$ line, which gives a mass $M_I\approx15\pm2$ Msun. We detected several other lines that more closely trace the disk, but were unable to identify their parent species. Using centroid-of-channel methods on these other lines, we infer a similar mass. These measurements solidify SrcI as a genuine high-mass protostar system and support the theory that SrcI and the Becklin Neugebauer Object were ejected from the dynamical decay of a multiple star system $\sim$500 years ago, an event that also launched the explosive molecular outflow in Orion.
  • High-mass stars have generally been assumed to accrete most of their mass while already contracted onto the main sequence, but this hypothesis has not been observationally tested. We present ALMA observations of a 3 x 1.5 pc area in the W51 high-mass star-forming complex. We identify dust continuum sources and measure the gas and dust temperature through both rotational diagram modeling of CH3OH and brightness-temperature-based limits. The observed region contains three high-mass YSOs that appear to be at the earliest stages of their formation, with no signs of ionizing radiation from their central sources. The data reveal high gas and dust temperatures (T > 100 K) extending out to about 5000 AU from each of these sources. There are no clear signs of disks or rotating structures down to our 1000 AU resolution. The extended warm gas provides evidence that, during the process of forming, these high-mass stars heat a large volume and correspondingly large mass of gas in their surroundings, inhibiting fragmentation and therefore keeping a large reservoir available to feed from. By contrast, the more mature massive stars that illuminate compact H ii regions have little effect on their surrounding dense gas, suggesting that these main sequence stars have completed most or all of their accretion. The high luminosity of the massive protostars (L > 10^4 solar luminosities), combined with a lack of centimeter continuum emission from these sources, implies that they are not on the main sequence while they accrete the majority of their mass; instead, they may be bloated and cool.
  • We present the results of a closure phase analysis of 3 mm very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements performed on Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We have analyzed observations made in May 2015 using the Very Long Baseline Array, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano and obtained non-zero closure phase measurements on several station triangles - indicative of a non-point-symmetric source structure. The data are fitted with an asymmetric source structure model in Sgr A*, represented by a simple two-component model, which favours a fainter component due East of the main source. This result is discussed in light of a scattering screen with substructure or an intrinsically asymmetric source.
  • We present new JVLA observations of the high-mass cluster-forming region W51A from 2 to 16 GHz with resolution ${\theta}_{fwhm} \approx$ 0.3 - 0.5". The data reveal a wealth of observational results: (1) Currently-forming, very massive (proto-O) stars are traced by o-H2CO $2_{1,1}-2_{1,2}$ emission, suggesting that this line can be used efficiently as a massive protostar tracer. (2) There is a spatially distributed population of $\sim$mJy continuum sources, including hypercompact H ii regions and candidate colliding wind binaries, in and around the W51 proto-clusters. (3) There are two clearly detected protoclusters, W51e and W51 IRS2, that are gas-rich but may have most of their mass in stars within their inner $\sim$ 0.05 pc. The majority of the bolometric luminosity in W51 most likely comes from a third population of OB stars between these clusters. The presence of a substantial population of exposed O-stars coincident with a population of still-forming massive stars, along with a direct measurement of the low mass loss rate via ionized gas outflow from W51 IRS2, together imply that feedback is ineffective at halting star formation in massive protoclusters. Instead, feedback may shut off the large-scale accretion of diffuse gas onto the W51 protoclusters, implying that they are evolving towards a state of gas exhaustion rather than gas expulsion. Recent theoretical models predict gas exhaustion to be a necessary step in the formation of gravitationally bound stellar clusters, and our results provide an observational validation of this process.
  • This paper is the third in a series of ammonia multilevel imaging studies in well-known high-mass star forming regions. Using the JVLA, we have mapped the hot and dense molecular gas in W51 Main, with about 0.2 arcsec angular resolution, in five highly-excited metastable inversion transitions of ammonia (ammonia): (J,K)=(6,6), (7,7), (9,9), (10,10), and (13,13). We have identified and characterised two main centers of high-mass star formation in W51-Main: the W51e2 complex and the W51e8 core (6 arcsec southward of W51e2). The former breaks down into three further sub-cores: W51e2-W, which surrounds the well known HC HII region, where hot ammonia is observed in absorption, and two additional dusty cores, W51e2-E (~0.8" to the East) and W51e2-NW (~1" to the North), where hot ammonia is observed in emission. The velocity maps towards the HC HII region show a clear velocity gradient that may indicate rotation, though we do not directly observe a Keplerian velocity profile. The absence of outflow and/or maser activity and the low amount of molecular gas available for accretion (~5 solar masses) with respect to the mass of the central YSO (>20 solar masses), both indicate that the central YSO has already accreted most of its final mass. On the other hand, in the nearby W51e2-E object, the relatively large amount of hot molecular gas available for accretion (~20 solar masses, within about half an arcsecond or 2500 AU), along with strong outflow and maser activity, indicates that the main accretion center in the W51e2 complex is W51e2-E rather than W51e2-W. Finally, W51e2-NW and W51e8, although less dense, are also hot cores and contain a significant amount of molecular gas (~30 and 70 solar masses, respectively). We speculate that they may host high-mass YSOs either at a previous evolutionary stage or with lower mass than W51e2-E and W51e2-W.
  • Adding VLBI capability to the SKA arrays will greatly broaden the science of the SKA, and is feasible within the current specifications. SKA-VLBI can be initially implemented by providing phased-array outputs for SKA1-MID and SKA1-SUR and using these extremely sensitive stations with other radio telescopes, and in SKA2 by realising a distributed configuration providing baselines up to thousands of km, merging it with existing VLBI networks. The motivation for and the possible realization of SKA-VLBI is described in this paper.
  • We have used the JVLA at the 1 cm band to map five highly-excited metastable inversion transitions of ammonia, (J,K)=(6,6), (7,7), (9,9), (10,10), and (13,13), in W51 IRS2 with ~0.2 angular resolution. We present detections of both thermal (extended) ammonia emission in the five inversion lines, with rotational states ranging in energy from about 400 to 1700 K, and point-like ammonia maser emission in the (6,6), (7,7), and (9,9) lines. The thermal ammonia emits around a velocity of 60 km/s, near the cloud's systemic velocity, is elongated in the east-west direction across 4" and is confined by the HII regions W51d, W51d1, and W51d2. The ammonia masers are observed in the eastern tip of the dense clump traced by thermal ammonia, offset by 0.65" to the East from its emission peak, and have a peak velocity at ~47.5 km/s. No maser components are detected near the systemic velocity. The ammonia masers are separated by 0.65" (3500 AU) from the (rare) vibrationally-excited SiO masers, excited by the deeply-embedded YSO W51-North. This excludes that the two maser species are excited by the same object. Interestingly, the ammonia masers originate at the same sky position as a peak in a submm line of SO2 imaged with the SMA, tracing a face-on circumstellar disk/ring around W51-North. In addition, the thermal emission from the most highly excited ammonia lines, (10,10) and (13,13), shows two main condensations, the dominant one towards W51-North with the SiO/H2O masers, and a weaker peak at the ammonia maser position. We propose a scenario where the ring seen in SO2 emission is a circumbinary disk surrounding (at least) two high-mass YSOs, W51-North (exciting the SiO masers) and a nearby companion (exciting the ammonia masers), separated by 3500 AU. This finding indicates a physical connection (in a binary) between the two rare SiO and ammonia maser species.
  • To constrain theoretical models of high-mass star formation, observational signatures of mass accretion in O-type forming stars are desirable. Using the JVLA, we have mapped the hot and dense molecular gas in the hot core NGC7538 IRS1, with 0.2'' angular resolution, in seven metastable (J=K) inversion transitions of ammonia: (J,K)=(6,6), (7,7), (9,9), (10,10), (12,12), (13,13), and (14,14). These lines arise from energy levels between ~400 K and ~1950 K above the ground state, and are observed in absorption against the HC-HII region associated with NGC7538 IRS1. With a 500 AU linear resolution, we resolve the elongated North-South ammonia structure into two compact components: the main core and a southernmost component. Previous observations of the radio continuum with a 0.08'' (or 200 AU) resolution, resolved in turn the compact core in two (northern and southern) components. These features correspond to a triple system of high-mass YSOs IRS1a, IRS1b, and IRS1c identified with VLBI measurements of methanol masers. The velocity maps of the compact core show a clear velocity gradient in all lines, which is indicative of rotation in a (circumbinary) envelope, containing ~40 solar masses (dynamical mass). In addition, we derived physical conditions of the molecular gas: rotational temperatures ~280 K, ammonia column densities ~1.4-2.5 x 10^19 cm-2, H_2 volume densities ~3.5-6.2 x 10^10 cm-3, and a total gas mass in the range of 19-34 solar masses, for the main core. We conclude that NGC7538 IRS1 is the densest hot molecular core known, containing a rotating envelope which hosts a multiple system of high-mass YSOs, possibly surrounded by accretion disks. Future JVLA observations in the A-configuration are needed to resolve the binary system in the core and may allow to study the gas kinematics in the accretion disks associated with individual binary members.
  • NGC7538 IRS1 is considered the best high-mass accretion disk candidate around an O-type young star in the northern hemisphere. We investigated the 3D kinematics and dynamics of circumstellar gas with very high linear resolution, from tens to 1500 AU, with the ultimate goal of building a comprehensive dynamical model for this YSO. We employed four different observing epochs of EVN data at 6.7 GHz, spanning almost eight years, which enabled us to measure, besides line-of-sight (l.o.s.) velocities and positions, also l.o.s. accelerations and proper motions of methanol masers. In addition, we imaged with the JVLA-B array highly-excited ammonia inversion lines, from (6,6) to (13,13), which enabled us to probe the hottest molecular gas very close to the exciting source(s). We found five 6.7 GHz maser clusters which are distributed over a region extended N-S across ~1500 AU and are associated with three peaks of the radio continuum. We proposed that these maser clusters identify three individual high-mass YSOs, named IRS1a, IRS1b, and IRS1c. We modeled the maser clusters in IRS1a and IRS1b in terms of edge-on disks in centrifugal equilibrium. In the first case, masers may trace a quasi-Keplerian thin disk, orbiting around a high-mass YSO, IRS1a, of up to 25 solar masses. This YSO dominates the bolometric luminosity of the region. The second disk is both massive (<16 Msun within ~500 AU) and thick, and the mass of the central YSO, IRS1b, is constrained to be at most a few solar masses. In summary, we present compelling evidence that NGC7538 IRS1 is not forming just one single high-mass YSO, but consists of a multiple system of high-mass YSOs, which are surrounded by accretion disks, and are probably driving individual outflows. This new model naturally explains all the different orientations and disk/outflow structures proposed for the region in previous models.
  • An international consortium is presently constructing a beamformer for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile that will be available as a facility instrument. The beamformer will aggregate the entire collecting area of the array into a single, very large aperture. The extraordinary sensitivity of phased ALMA, combined with the extremely fine angular resolution available on baselines to the Northern Hemisphere, will enable transformational new very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations in Bands 6 and 7 (1.3 and 0.8 mm) and provide substantial improvements to existing VLBI arrays in Bands 1 and 3 (7 and 3 mm). The ALMA beamformer will have impact on a variety of scientific topics, including accretion and outflow processes around black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN), tests of general relativity near black holes, jet launch and collimation from AGN and microquasars, pulsar and magnetar emission processes, the chemical history of the universe and the evolution of fundamental constants across cosmic time, maser science, and astrometry.
  • Using Science Verification data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have identified and imaged five rotational transitions (J=5-4 and J=6-5) of the three silicon monoxide isotopologues 28SiO v=0, 1, 2 and 29SiO v=0 and 28Si18O v=0 in the frequency range from 214 to 246 GHz towards the Orion BN/KL region. The emission of the ground-state 28SiO, 29SiO and 28Si18O shows an extended bipolar shape in the northeast-southwest direction at the position of Radio Source I, indicating that these isotopologues trace an outflow (~18 km/s, P.A. ~50deg, ~5000 AU in diameter) that is driven by this embedded high-mass young stellar object (YSO). Whereas on small scales (10-1000 AU) the outflow from Source I has a well-ordered spatial and velocity structure, as probed by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging of SiO masers, the large scales (500-5000 AU) probed by thermal SiO with ALMA reveal a complex structure and velocity field, most likely related to the effects of the environment of the BN/KL region on the outflow emanating from Source I. The emission of the vibrationally-excited species peaks at the position of Source I. This emission is compact and not resolved at an angular resolution of ~1.5" (~600 AU at a distance of 420 pc). 2-D Gaussian fitting to individual velocity channels locates emission peaks within radii of 100 AU, i.e. they trace the innermost part of the outflow. A narrow spectral profile and spatial distribution of the v=1 J=5-4 line similar to the masing v=1 J=1-0 transition, provide evidence for the most highly rotationally excited (frequency > 200 GHz) SiO maser emission associated with Source I known to date. The maser emission will enable studies of the Source I disk-outflow interface with future ALMA longest baselines.
  • This work presents a study of the milliarcsecond structure of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers at high-velocity resolution (0.09 km s^(-1)) in four high-mass star-forming regions: G16.59-0.05, G23.01-0.41, IRAS20126+4104, and AFGL5142. We studied these sources by means of multi-epoch VLBI observations in the 22 GHz water and 6.7 GHz methanol masers, to determine the 3-D gas kinematics within a few thousand AU from the (proto)star. The present work exploits the 6.7 GHz maser data collected so far to investigate the milliarcsecond structure of this maser emission at high-velocity resolution. Most of the detected 6.7 GHz maser features present an ordered (linear, or arc-like) distribution of maser spots on the plane of the sky, together with a regular variation in the spot LSR velocity (V_LSR) with position. Typical values for the amplitude of the V_LSR gradients (defined in terms of the derivative of the spot V_LSR with position) are found to be 0.1-0.2 km s^(-1) mas^(-1). In each of the four target sources, the orientation and the amplitude of most of the feature V_LSR gradients remain remarkably stable in time, on timescales of (at least) several years. We also find that the data are consistent with having the V_LSR gradients and proper motion vectors in the same direction on the sky, considered the measurement uncertainties. The time persistency, the ordered angular and spatial distribution, and the orientation generally similar to the proper motions, altogether suggest a kinematical interpretation for the origin of the 6.7 GHz maser V_LSR gradients. This work shows that the organized motions (outflow, infall, and rotation) revealed by the (22 GHz water and 6.7 GHz methanol) masers on large scales (~100-1000 AU) also persist to very small (~10 AU) scales.
  • The Orion BN/KL complex is the nearest site of ongoing high-mass star formation. Recent proper motion observations provide convincing evidence of a recent (about 500 years ago) dynamical interaction between two massive young stellar objects in the region resulting in high velocities: the BN object and radio Source I. At the same time, Source I is surrounded by a nearly edge-on disc with radius ~50 au. These two observations taken together are puzzling: a dynamical encounter between multiple stars naturally yields the proper motions, but the survival of a disc is challenging to explain. In this paper we take the first steps to numerically explore the preferred dynamical scenario of Goddi et al., in which Source I is a binary that underwent a scattering encounter with BN, in order to determine if a pre-existing disc can survive this encounter in some form. Treating only gravitational forces, we are able to thoroughly and efficiently cover a large range of encounter parameters. We find that disc material can indeed survive a three-body scattering event if 1) the encounter is close, i.e. BN's closest approach to Source I is comparable to Source I's semi-major axis; and 2) the interplay of the three stars is of a short duration. Furthermore, we are able to constrain the initial conditions that can broadly produce the orientation of the present-day system's disc relative to its velocity vector. To first order we can thus confirm the plausibility of the scattering scenario of Goddi et al., and we have significantly constrained the parameters and narrowed the focus of future, more complex and expensive attempts to computationally model the complicated BN/KL region.