• We present the relation between stellar specific angular momentum $j_*$, stellar mass $M_*$, and bulge-to-total light ratio $\beta$ for THINGS, CALIFA and Romanowsky \& Fall datasets, exploring the existence of a fundamental plane between these parameters as first suggested by Obreschkow \& Glazebrook. Our best-fit $M_*-j_*$ relation yields a slope of $\alpha = 1.03 \pm 0.11$ with a trivariate fit including $\beta$. When ignoring the effect of $\beta$, the exponent $\alpha = 0.56 \pm 0.06$ is consistent with $\alpha = 2/3$ predicted for dark matter halos. There is a linear $\beta - j_*/M_*$ relation for $\beta \lesssim 0.4$, exhibiting a general trend of increasing $\beta$ with decreasing $j_*/M_*$. Galaxies with $\beta \gtrsim 0.4$ have higher $j_*$ than predicted by the relation. Pseudobulge galaxies have preferentially lower $\beta$ for a given $j_*/M_*$ than galaxies that contain classical bulges. Pseudobulge galaxies follow a well-defined track in $\beta - j_*/M_*$ space, consistent with Obreschkow \& Glazebrook, while galaxies with classical bulges do not. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that while growth in either bulge type is linked to a decrease in $j_*/M_*$, the mechanisms that build pseudobulges seem to be less efficient at increasing bulge mass per decrease in specific angular momentum than those that build classical bulges.
  • Taipan is a multi-object spectroscopic galaxy survey starting in 2017 that will cover 2pi steradians over the southern sky, and obtain optical spectra for about two million galaxies out to z<0.4. Taipan will use the newly-refurbished 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory with the new TAIPAN instrument, which includes an innovative 'Starbugs' positioning system capable of rapidly and simultaneously deploying up to 150 spectroscopic fibres (and up to 300 with a proposed upgrade) over the 6-deg diameter focal plane, and a purpose-built spectrograph operating from 370 to 870nm with resolving power R>2000. The main scientific goals of Taipan are: (i) to measure the distance scale of the Universe (primarily governed by the local expansion rate, H_0) to 1% precision, and the structure growth rate of structure to 5%; (ii) to make the most extensive map yet constructed of the mass distribution and motions in the local Universe, using peculiar velocities based on improved Fundamental Plane distances, which will enable sensitive tests of gravitational physics; and (iii) to deliver a legacy sample of low-redshift galaxies as a unique laboratory for studying galaxy evolution as a function of mass and environment. The final survey, which will be completed within 5 years, will consist of a complete magnitude-limited sample (i<17) of about 1.2x10^6 galaxies, supplemented by an extension to higher redshifts and fainter magnitudes (i<18.1) of a luminous red galaxy sample of about 0.8x10^6 galaxies. Observations and data processing will be carried out remotely and in a fully-automated way, using a purpose-built automated 'virtual observer' software and an automated data reduction pipeline. The Taipan survey is deliberately designed to maximise its legacy value, by complementing and enhancing current and planned surveys of the southern sky at wavelengths from the optical to the radio.
  • We use the energy-balance code MAGPHYS to determine stellar and dust masses, and dust corrected star-formation rates for over 200,000 GAMA galaxies, 170,000 G10-COSMOS galaxies and 200,000 3D-HST galaxies. Our values agree well with previously reported measurements and constitute a representative and homogeneous dataset spanning a broad range in stellar mass (10^8---10^12 Msol), dust mass (10^6---10^9 Msol), and star-formation rates (0.01---100 Msol per yr), and over a broad redshift range (0.0 < z < 5.0). We combine these data to measure the cosmic star-formation history (CSFH), the stellar-mass density (SMD), and the dust-mass density (DMD) over a 12 Gyr timeline. The data mostly agree with previous estimates, where they exist, and provide a quasi-homogeneous dataset using consistent mass and star-formation estimators with consistent underlying assumptions over the full time range. As a consequence our formal errors are significantly reduced when compared to the historic literature. Integrating our cosmic star-formation history we precisely reproduce the stellar-mass density with an ISM replenishment factor of 0.50 +/- 0.07, consistent with our choice of Chabrier IMF plus some modest amount of stripped stellar mass. Exploring the cosmic dust density evolution, we find a gradual increase in dust density with lookback time. We build a simple phenomenological model from the CSFH to account for the dust mass evolution, and infer two key conclusions: (1) For every unit of stellar mass which is formed 0.0065---0.004 units of dust mass is also formed; (2) Over the history of the Universe approximately 90 to 95 per cent of all dust formed has been destroyed and/or ejected.
  • We present a MUSE and KMOS dynamical study 405 star-forming galaxies at redshift z=0.28-1.65 (median redshift z=0.84). Our sample are representative of star-forming, main-sequence galaxies, with star-formation rates of SFR=0.1-30Mo/yr and stellar masses M=10^8-10^11Mo. For 49+/-4% of our sample, the dynamics suggest rotational support, 24+/-3% are unresolved systems and 5+/-2% appear to be early-stage major mergers with components on 8-30kpc scales. The remaining 22+/-5% appear to be dynamically complex, irregular (or face-on systems). For galaxies whose dynamics suggest rotational support, we derive inclination corrected rotational velocities and show these systems lie on a similar scaling between stellar mass and specific angular momentum as local spirals with j*=J/M*\propto M^(2/3) but with a redshift evolution that scales as j*\propto M^{2/3}(1+z)^(-1). We identify a correlation between specific angular momentum and disk stability such that galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum, log(j*/M^(2/3))>2.5, are the most stable, with Toomre Q=1.10+/-0.18, compared to Q=0.53+/-0.22 for galaxies with log(j*/M^(2/3))<2.5. At a fixed mass, the HST morphologies of galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum resemble spiral galaxies, whilst those with low specific angular momentum are morphologically complex and dominated by several bright star-forming regions. This suggests that angular momentum plays a major role in defining the stability of gas disks: at z~1, massive galaxies that have disks with low specific angular momentum, appear to be globally unstable, clumpy and turbulent systems. In contrast, galaxies with high specific angular have evolved in to stable disks with spiral structures.
  • We compare the mass and internal distribution of atomic hydrogen (HI) in 2200 present-day central galaxies with M_star > 10^10 M_Sun from the 100 Mpc EAGLE Reference simulation to observational data. Atomic hydrogen fractions are corrected for self-shielding using a fitting formula from radiative transfer simulations and for the presence of molecular hydrogen using an empirical or a theoretical prescription from the literature. The resulting neutral hydrogen fractions, M_(HI+H2)/M_star, agree with observations to better than 0.1 dex for galaxies with M_star between 10^10 and 10^11 M_Sun. Our fiducial, empirical H2 model based on gas pressure results in galactic HI mass fractions, M_HI/M_star, that agree with observations from the GASS survey to better than 0.3 dex, but the alternative theoretical H2 formula leads to a negative offset in M_HI/M_star of up to 0.5 dex. Visual inspection reveals that most HI disks in simulated HI-rich galaxies are vertically disturbed, plausibly due to recent accretion events. Many galaxies (up to 80 per cent) contain spuriously large HI holes, which are likely formed as a consequence of the feedback implementation in EAGLE. The HI mass-size relation of all simulated galaxies is close to (but 16 per cent steeper than) observed, and when only galaxies without large holes in the HI disc are considered, the agreement becomes excellent (better than 0.1 dex). The presence of large HI holes also makes the radial HI surface density profiles somewhat too low in the centre, at \Sigma_HI > 1 M_Sun pc^-2 (by a factor of <~ 2 compared to data from the Bluedisk survey). In the outer region (\Sigma_HI < 1 M_Sun pc^-2), the simulated profiles agree quantitatively with observations. Scaled by HI size, the simulated profiles of HI-rich (M_HI > 10^9.8 M_Sun) and control galaxies (10^9.1 M_Sun > M_HI > 10^9.8 M_Sun) follow each other closely, as observed. (Abridged)
  • We aim to measure the average dust and molecular gas content of massive star-forming galaxies ($\rm > 3 \times 10^{10}\,M_\odot$) up to z=4 in the COSMOS field to determine if the intense star formation observed at high redshift is induced by major mergers or caused by large gas reservoirs. Firstly, we measured the evolution of the average spectral energy distributions as a function of redshift using a stacking analysis of Spitzer, Herschel, LABOCA, and AzTEC data for two samples of galaxies: normal star-forming objects and strong starbursts, as defined by their distance to the main sequence. We found that the mean intensity of the radiation field $< U >$ heating the dust (strongly correlated with dust temperature) increases with increasing redshift up to z$\sim$4 in main-sequence galaxies. We can reproduce this evolution with simple models that account for the decrease of the gas metallicity with redshift. No evolution of $< U >$ with redshift is found in strong starbursts. We then deduced the evolution of the molecular gas fraction (defined here as $\rm M_{\rm mol}/(M_{\rm mol}+M_\star)$) with redshift and found a similar, steeply increasing trend for both samples. At z$\sim$4, this fraction reaches $\sim$60%. The average position of the main-sequence galaxies is on the locus of the local, normal star-forming disks in the integrated Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram (star formation rate versus mass of molecular gas), suggesting that the bulk of the star formation up to z=4 is dominated by secular processes.
  • We exploit ALMA 870um (345GHz) observations of submillimetre sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South to investigate the far-infrared properties of high-redshift submillimetre galaxies (SMGs). Using the precisely located 870um ALMA positions of 99 SMGs, together with 24um and radio imaging of this field, we deblend the Herschel/SPIRE imaging of this region to extract their far-infrared fluxes and colours. The median photometric redshifts for ALMA LESS (ALESS) SMGs which are detected in at least two SPIRE bands increases with wavelength of the peak in their SEDs, with z=2.3+/-0.2, 2.5+/-0.3 and 3.5+/-0.5 for the 250, 350 and 500-um peakers respectively. We find that 34 ALESS SMGs do not have a >3-sigma counterpart at 250, 350 or 500-um. These galaxies have a median photometric redshift of z=3.3+/-0.5, which is higher than the full ALESS SMG sample; z=2.5+/-0.2. Using the photometric redshifts together with the 250-870um photometry, we estimate the far-infrared luminosities and characteristic dust temperature of each SMG. The median infrared luminosity of the S_870um>2mJy SMGs is L_IR=(3.0+/-0.3)x10^{12}Lo(SFR=300+/-30Mo/yr). At a fixed luminosity, the characteristic dust temperature of these high-redshift SMGs is 2-3K lower than comparably luminous galaxies at z=0, reflecting the more extended star formation occurring in these systems. By extrapolating the 870um number counts to S_ 870um=1mJy, we show that the contribution of S_870um>1mJy SMGs to the cosmic star formation budget is 20% of the total over the redshift range z~1-4. We derive a median dust mass for these SMGs of M_d=(3.6+/-0.3)x10^8Mo and by adopting an appropriate gas-to-dust ratio, we estimate an average molecular mass of M_H2=(4.2+/-0.4)x10^{10}Mo. Finally, we use our estimates of the H2 masses to show that SMGs with S_870um>1mJy contain ~10% of the z~2 volume-averaged H2 mass density at this epoch.