• High-resolution simulations of supermassive black holes in isolated galaxies have suggested the importance of short (~10 Myr) episodes of rapid accretion caused by interactions between the black hole and massive dense clouds within the host. Accretion of such clouds could potentially provide the dominant source for black hole growth in high-z galaxies, but it remains unresolved in cosmological simulations. Using a stochastic subgrid model calibrated by high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations, we investigate the impact that variability in black hole accretion rates has on black hole growth and the evolution of the host galaxy. We find this clumpy accretion to more efficiently fuel high-redshift black hole growth. This increased mass allows for more rapid accretion even in the absence of high-density clumps, compounding the effect and resulting in substantially faster overall black hole growth. This increased growth allows the black hole to efficiently evacuate gas from the central region of the galaxy, driving strong winds up to ~2500 km/s, producing outflows ~10x stronger than the smooth accretion case, suppressing the inflow of gas onto the host galaxy, and suppressing the star formation within the galaxy by as much as a factor of two. This suggests that the proper incorporation of variability is a key factor in the co-evolution between black holes and their hosts.
  • We use the high-resolution cosmological simulation Illustris to investigate the clustering of supermassive black holes across cosmic time, the link between black hole clustering and host halo masses, and the implications for black hole duty cycles. Our predicted black hole correlation length and bias match the observational data very well across the full redshift range probed. Black hole clustering is strongly luminosity-dependent on small, 1-halo scales, with some moderate dependence on larger scales of a few Mpc at intermediate redshifts. We find black hole clustering to evolve only weakly with redshift, initially following the behaviour of their hosts. However below z ~ 2 black hole clustering increases faster than that of their hosts, which leads to a significant overestimate of the clustering-predicted host halo mass. The full distribution of host halo masses is very wide, including a low-mass tail extending up to an order of magnitude below the naive prediction for minimum host mass. Our black hole duty cycles follow a power-law dependence on black hole mass and decrease with redshift, and we provide accurate analytic fits to these. The increase in clustering amplitude at late times, however, means that duty cycle estimates based on black hole clustering can overestimate duty cycles substantially, by more than two orders of magnitude. We find the best agreement when the minimum host mass is assumed to be $10^{11.2} M_\odot$ , which provides an accurate measure across all redshifts and luminosity ranges probed by our simulation.
  • We study the evolution of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies using AMR cosmological simulations at redshifts z=6-1. Our sample consists of 34 galaxies, of halo masses 10^{11}-10^{12}M_s at z=2, run with and without radiation pressure (RP) feedback from young stars. While RP has little effect on the sizes and global stability of discs, it reduces the amount of star-forming gas by a factor of ~2, leading to a decrease in stellar mass by a similar factor by z~2. Both samples undergo violent disc instability (VDI) and form giant clumps of masses 10^7-10^9M_s at a similar rate, though RP significantly reduces the number of long-lived clumps. When RP is (not) included, clumps with circular velocity <40(20)km/s, baryonic surface density <200(100)M_s/pc^2 and baryonic mass <10^{8.2}(10^{7.3})M_s are short-lived, disrupted in a few free-fall times. The more massive and dense clumps survive and migrate toward the disc centre over a few disc orbital times. In the RP simulations, the distribution of clump masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) normalized to their host disc is very similar at all redshifts. They exhibit a truncated power-law with a slope slightly shallower than -2. Short-lived clumps preferentially have young stellar ages, low masses, high gas fractions and specific SFRs (sSFR), and they tend to populate the outer disc. The sSFR of massive, long-lived clumps declines with age as they migrate towards the disc centre, producing gradients in mass, stellar age, gas fraction, sSFR and metallicity that distinguish them from short-lived clumps. Ex situ mergers make up ~37% of the mass in clumps and ~29% of the SFR. They are more massive and with older stellar ages than the in situ clumps, especially near the disc edge. Roughly half the galaxies at redshifts z=4-1 are clumpy over a wide range of stellar mass, with clumps accounting for ~3-30% of the SFR but ~0.1-3% of the stellar mass.
  • Using cosmological simulations, we address the interplay between structure and star formation in high-redshift galaxies via the evolution of surface density profiles. Our sample consists of 26 galaxies evolving in the redshift range $z=7-1$, spanning the stellar mass range $(0.2-6.4)\times 10^{10}M_\odot$ at $z=2$. We recover the main trends by stacking the profiles in accordance to their evolution phases. Following a wet compaction event that typically occurs when the stellar mass is $\sim10^{9.5}~M_{\odot}$ at $z\sim2-4$, the gas develops a cusp inside the effective radius, associated with a peak in star-formation rate (SFR). The SFR peak and the associated feedback, in the absence of further gas inflow to the centre, marks the onset of gas depletion from the central 1 kpc, leading to quenching of the central SFR. An extended, star-forming ring that forms by fresh gas during the central quenching process shows as a rising specific SFR (sSFR) profile, which is interpreted as inside-out quenching. Before quenching, the stellar density profile grows self-similarly, maintaining its log-log shape because the sSFR is similar at all radii. During the quenching process, the stellar density saturates to a constant value, especially in the inner 1 kpc. The stellar mass and SFR profiles deduced from observations show very similar shapes, consistent with the scenario of wet compaction leading to inside-out quenching and the subsequent saturation of a dense stellar core. We predict a cuspy gas profile during the blue nugget phase, and a gas-depleted core, sometimes surrounded by a ring, in the post-blue nugget phase.
  • Using cosmological simulations, we address the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs) across their main sequence (MS) in the plane of star-formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass. We relate them to the evolution of galaxies through phases of gas compaction, depletion, possible replenishment, and eventual quenching. We find that the high-SFR galaxies in the upper envelope of the MS are compact, with high gas fractions and short depletion times ("blue nuggets"), while the lower-SFR galaxies in the lower envelope have lower central gas densities, lower gas fractions and longer depletion times, consistent with observed gradients across the MS. Stellar-structure gradients are negligible. The SFGs oscillate about the MS ridge on timescales $\sim0.4~t_{\mathrm{Hubble}}$ ($\sim1$ Gyr at $z\sim3$). The propagation upwards is due to gas compaction, triggered, e.g., by mergers, counter-rotating streams, and/or violent disc instabilities. The downturn at the upper envelope is due to central gas depletion by peak star formation and outflows while inflow from the shrunken gas disc is suppressed. An upturn at the lower envelope can occur once the extended disc has been replenished by fresh gas and a new compaction can be triggered, namely as long as the replenishment time is shorter than the depletion time. The mechanisms of gas compaction, depletion and replenishment confine the SFGs to the narrow ($\pm0.3$ dex) MS. Full quenching occurs in massive haloes ($M_{\mathrm{vir}}>10^{11.5}~M_\odot$) and/or at low redshifts ($z<3$), where the replenishment time is long compared to the depletion time, explaining the observed bending down of the MS at the massive end.
  • We use cosmological simulations to study a characteristic evolution pattern of high redshift galaxies. Early, stream-fed, highly perturbed, gas-rich discs undergo phases of dissipative contraction into compact, star-forming systems (blue nuggets) at z~4-2. The peak of gas compaction marks the onset of central gas depletion and inside-out quenching into compact ellipticals (red nuggets) by z~2. These are sometimes surrounded by gas rings or grow extended dry stellar envelopes. The compaction occurs at a roughly constant specific star-formation rate (SFR), and the quenching occurs at a constant stellar surface density within the inner kpc ($\Sigma_1$). Massive galaxies quench earlier, faster, and at a higher $\Sigma_1$ than lower-mass galaxies, which compactify and attempt to quench more than once. This evolution pattern is consistent with the way galaxies populate the SFR-radius-mass space, and with gradients and scatter across the main sequence. The compaction is triggered by an intense inflow episode, involving (mostly minor) mergers, counter-rotating streams or recycled gas, and is commonly associated with violent disc instability. The contraction is dissipative, with the inflow rate >SFR, and the maximum $\Sigma_1$ anti-correlated with the initial spin parameter, as predicted by Dekel & Burkert (2014). The central quenching is triggered by the high SFR and stellar/supernova feedback (possibly also AGN feedback) due to the high central gas density, while the central inflow weakens as the disc vanishes. Suppression of fresh gas supply by a hot halo allows the long-term maintenance of quenching once above a threshold halo mass, inducing the quenching downsizing.
  • We use the high-resolution simulation MassiveBlackII to examine scaling relations between black hole mass (MBH) and host galaxy properties (sigma, M*, and LV), finding good agreement with observational data, especially at the high-mass end. The simulations have less intrinsic scatter than observations, and the MBH-LV correlation has the largest scatter, suggesting it may the the least fundamental of the three relations. We find Gaussian scatter about all three relations, except among the highest mass galaxies, which host more massive black holes. Below z~2 the slopes for the full population remain roughly z-independent, and only steepen by 50% by z~4. The normalization of the sigma, LV relations evolve by 0.3, 0.43 dex, while the MBH correlation does not evolve to at least z~2. Testing for selection biases, we find samples selected by MBH or M* have steeper slopes than randomly selected samples. If unaccounted for, such a selection function would find faster evolution than inferred from a randomly selected sample, as objects at the highend of the relation tend to evolve more rapidly. We find a potential bias among high-LBH subsamples (tending to reside in higher mass galaxies), but these bright-AGN exhibit no intrinsic bias relative to fainter ones in equivalent-mass hosts, nor is there a significant difference between active- and inactive-samples. Finally we characterize the evolution of individual black holes along the scaling planes. Below the local relation, black holes grow faster than their host (72% of black holes 0.3 dex below the mean relation have a MBH-M* trajectory steeper than the local relation), while those above have shallower trajectories (only 14% are steeper than local). Black holes tend to grow faster than their hosts until surpassing the local relation, at which point their growth is suppressed while their hosts continue to grow, returning them to the mean relation.
  • (Abridged for arXiv)We investigate the properties of halos, galaxies and blackholes to z=0 in the high resolution hydrodynamical simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII) which evolves a LCDM cosmology in a comoving volume Vbox=100(Mpc/h)^3. MBII is the highest resolution simulation of this size which includes a self-consistent model for star formation, black hole accretion and associated feedback. We provide a simulation browser web application which enables interactive search and tagging of halos, subhalos and their properties and publicly release our galaxy catalogs. Our analysis of the halo mass function (MF) in MBII reveals that baryons have strong effects, with changes in the halo abundance of 20-35% below the knee of the MF (Mhalo < 10^13.2 Msun/h at z=0) when compared to fits based on dark matter only simulations. We provide a fitting function for the halo MF out to redshift z=11 and discuss how the onset of non-universality in the MF limits the accuracy of our fit. We study the halo occupation distribution and clustering of galaxies, in particular the evolution and scale dependence of stochasticity and bias finding reasonable agreement with observational data. The shape of the cosmic spectral energy distribution predicted by MBII is consistent with observations, but lower in amplitude. The Galaxy Stellar Mass Function (GSMF) function is broadly consistent with observations at z>=2. At z<2, the population of passive low mass (for M*<10^9 Msun) galaxies in MBII makes the GSMF too steep compared to observations whereas at the high mass end (M*>10^11 Msun) galaxies hosting bright AGNs make significant contributions to the GSMF. The quasar bolometric luminosity function is also largely consistent with observations. We note however that more efficient AGN feedback (beyond simple thermal coupling used here) is likely necessary for the largest, rarest objects/clusters at low redshifts.
  • We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z=5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M_1450<-26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering ~6000 deg^2, then extend to lower luminosities (M_1450<-24) with newly discovered, faint z~5 quasars selected from 235 deg^2 of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7<z<5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M_1450* ~ -27). The bright end slope is steep (beta <~ -4), with a constraint of beta < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright end slope reported previously. We find a factor of ~2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M_1450<-26) from z=5 to z=6 than from z=4 to z=5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate ~30% of the ionizing photons required to keep the universe ionized at z=5.
  • We present a new measurement of the optical Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine (DR9), we select a uniform sample of 22,301 i<=21.8 quasars over an area of 2236 sq. deg with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2<z<3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. We derive the completeness of the survey through simulated quasar photometry, and check this completeness estimate using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar k-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M_i(z=2.2) = -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z=3.5. We find that a log-linear relation (in log[Phi*] - M*) for a luminosity and density evolution (LEDE) model adequately describes our data within the range 2.2<z<3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of ~2.3 while Phi* declines by a factor of ~6. At z<2.2 our data is reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model. We see only a weak signature of "AGN downsizing", in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.
  • Using a new large-scale (~ 0.75 Gpc)^3 hydrodynamic cosmological simulation we investigate the growth rate of supermassive black holes in the early universe (z > 4.75). Remarkably, we find a clear peak in the typical Eddington ratio at black hole masses of 4-8 * 10^7 solar masses (typically found in halos of ~7 * 10^11 to 10^12 solar masses), independent of redshift and indicative that most of BH growth occurs in the cold-flow dominated regime. Black hole growth is by and large regulated by the evolution of gas density. The typical Eddington ratio at a given mass scales simply as cosmological density (1+z)^3 and the peak is caused by the competition between increased gas density available in more massive hosts, and a decrease due to strong AGN feedback that deprives the black hole of sufficient gas to fuel further rapid growth in the high mass end. In addition to evolution in the mean Eddington ratio, we show that the distribution of Eddington ratio among both mass-selected and luminosity-selected samples is approximately log-normal. We combine these findings into a single log-normal fitting formula for the distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of (M_BH,z). This formula can be used in analytic and semi analytic models for evolving black hole populations, predicting black hole masses of observed quasars, and, in conjunction with the observed distribution of Eddington ratios, can be used to constrain the black hole mass function.
  • We investigate the formation and properties of galaxies hosting z~6 quasars, in the gigaparsec scale cosmological hydrodynamical simulation: MassiveBlack, which includes a self-consistent model for star formation, black hole accretion and associated feedback. We show that the MassiveBlack reproduces current estimates of the galaxy stellar mass function z=5, 6. We find that quasar hosts in the simulation are compact gas rich systems with high star formations rates of SFR ~ 100-1000 Msun/yr consistent with observed properties of Sloan quasar hosts in the redshift range 5.5 < z < 6.5. We show that the star-forming gas in these galaxies predominantly originates from high density cold streams which are able to penetrate the halo and grow the galaxy at the center. MassiveBlack predicts a deviation from the local Mbh-sigma and Mbh-Mstar relation implying that black holes are relatively more massive for a given stellar host at these redshifts.
  • Observations of the most distant bright quasars imply that billion solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBH) have to be assembled within the first eight hundred million years. Under our standard galaxy formation scenario such fast growth implies large gas densities providing sustained accretion at critical or supercritical rates onto an initial black hole seed. It has been a long standing question whether and how such high black hole accretion rates can be achieved and sustained at the centers of early galaxies. Here we use our new cosmological hydrodynamic simulation (MassiveBlack) covering a volume (0.75 \Gpc)^3 appropriate for studying the rare first quasars to show that steady high density cold gas flows responsible for assembling the first galaxies produce the high gas densities that lead to sustained critical accretion rates and hence rapid growth commensurate with the existence of ~10^9 solar mass black holes as early as z~7. We find that under these conditions quasar feedback is not effective at stopping the cold gas from penetrating the central regions and hence cannot quench the accretion until the host galaxy reaches M_halo > 10^{12} solar masses. This cold-flow driven scenario for the formation of quasars implies that they should be ubiquitous in galaxies in the early universe and that major (proto)galaxy mergers are not a requirement for efficient fuel supply and growth, particularly for the earliest SMBHs.
  • We examine predictions for the quasar luminosity functions (QLF) and quasar clustering at high redshift (z > 4.75) using MassiveBlack, our new hydrodynamic cosmological simulation which includes a self-consistent model for black hole growth and feedback. We show that the model reproduces the Sloan QLF within observational constraints at z >= 5. We find that the high-z QLF is consistent with a redshift-independent occupation distribution of BHs among dark matter halos (which we provide) such that the evolution of the QLF follows that of the halo mass function. The sole exception is the bright-end at z=6 and 7, where BHs in high-mass halos tend to be unusually bright due to extended periods of Eddington growth caused by high density cold flows into the halo center. We further use these luminosity functions to make predictions for the number density of quasars in upcoming surveys, predicting there should be ~119+-28 (~87+-28) quasars detectable in the F125W band of the WIDE (DEEP) fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) from z=5-6, ~19+-7 (~18+-9) from z=6-7, and ~1.7+-1.5 (~1.5+-1.5) from z=7-8. We also investigate quasar clustering, finding that the correlation length is fully consistent with current constraints for Sloan quasars (r_0~17 h^{-1} Mpc at z=4 for quasars above m_i = 20.2), and grows slowly with redshift up to z=6 (r_0~22 h^{-1} Mpc). Finally, we note that the quasar clustering strength depends weakly on luminosity for low L_BH, but gets stronger at higher L_BH as the BHs are found in higher mass halos.
  • We investigate the halo occupation distribution (HOD) of black holes within a hydrodynamic cosmological simulation that directly follows black hole growth. Similar to the HOD of galaxies/subhalos, we find that the black hole occupation number can be described by the form N_BH proportional to 1+ (M_Host)^alpha where alpha evolves mildly with redshift indicating that a given mass halo (M_Host) at low redshift tends to host fewer BHs than at high redshift (as expected as a result of galaxy and BH mergers). We further divide the occupation number into contributions from black holes residing in central and satellite galaxies within a halo. The distribution of M_BH within halos tends to consist of a single massive BH (distributed about a peak mass strongly correlated with M_Host), and a collection of relatively low-mass secondary BHs, with weaker correlation with M_Host. We also examine the spatial distribution of BHs within their host halos, and find they typically follow a power-law radial distribution (i.e. much more centrally concentrated than the subhalo distribution). Finally, we characterize the host mass for which BH growth is feedback dominated (e.g. star formation quenched). We show that halos with M_Host > 3 * 10^12 M_sun have primary BHs that are feedback dominated by z~3 with lower mass halos becoming increasingly more affected at lower redshift.
  • We examine the clustering properties of a population of quasars drawn from fully hydrodynamic cosmological simulations that directly follow black hole growth. We find that the black hole correlation function is best described by two distinct components: contributions from BH pairs occupying the same dark matter halo ('1-halo term') which dominate at scales below 300 kpc/h, and contributions from BHs occupying separate halos ('2-halo term') which dominate at larger scales. From the 2-halo BH term we find a typical host halo mass for faint-end quasars (those probed in our simulation volumes) ranging from 10^11 to a few 10^12 solar masses from z=5 to z=1 respectively (consistent with the mean halo host mass). The BH correlation function shows a luminosity dependence as a function of redshift, though weak enough to be consistent with observational constraints. At small scales, the high resolution of our simulations allows us to probe the 1-halo clustering in detail, finding that the 1-halo term follows an approximate power law, lacking the characteristic decrease in slope at small scales found in 1-halo terms for galaxies and dark matter. We show that this difference is a direct result of a boost in the small-scale quasar bias caused by galaxies hosting multiple quasars (1-subhalo term) following a merger event, typically between a large central subgroup and a smaller, satellite subgroup hosting a relatively small black hole. We show that our predicted small-scale excess caused by such mergers is in good agreement with both the slope and amplitude indicated by recent small-scale measurements. Finally, we note the excess to be a strong function of halo mass, such that the observed excess is well matched by the multiple black holes of intermediate mass (10^7-10^8 solar masses) found in hosts of 4-8*10^11 solar masses, a range well probed by our simulations.
  • We investigate the predictions for the faint-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) and its evolution using fully cosmological hydrodynamic simulations which self-consistently follow star formation, black hole growth and associated feedback processes. We find remarkably good agreement between predicted and observed faint end of the optical and X-ray QLFs (the bright end is not accessible in our simulated volumes) at z < 2. At higher redshifts our simulations tend to overestimate the QLF at the faintest luminosities. We show that although the low (high) luminosity ranges of the faint-end QLF are dominated by low (high) mass black holes, a wide range of black hole masses still contributes to any given luminosity range. This is consistent with the complex lightcurves of black holes resulting from the detailed hydrodynamics followed in the simulations. Consistent with the results on the QLFs, we find good agreement for the evolution of the comoving number density (in optical, soft and hard X-ray bands) of AGN for luminosities above 10^43 erg/s. However, the luminosity density evolution from the simulation appears to imply a peak at higher redshift than constrained from hard X-ray data (but not in optical). Our predicted excess at the faintest fluxes at z >= 2 does not lead to an overestimate to the total X-ray background and its contribution is at most a factor of two larger than the unresolved fraction of the 2-8 keV background. Even though this could be explained by some yet undetected, perhaps heavily obscured faint quasar population, we show that our predictions for the faint sources at high redshifts (which are dominated by the low mass black holes) in the simulations are likely affected by resolution effects.