• Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods is the non-linear relation linking actuator strokes to the point spread function in the coronagraph focal plane. The Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) method is achieving this minimization by solving a non linear differential Monge Ampere equation. Once this open loop method have reached the minimum, a close-loop stroke minimization method can be applied to correct for phase and amplitude aberrations to achieve the ultimate contrast. In this paper, I describe the results of the parametric analysis that that I have undertaken on this method. After recalling the principle of the method, I will described the explored parameter space (deformable mirror set-up, shape of the pupil, bandwidth, coronagraph designs). I will precisely described the way I simulated the Vortex coronagraph for this numerical simulation. Finally I will present the preliminary results of this parametric analysis for space telescope pupils only.
  • The current generation of ground-based coronagraphic instruments uses deformable mirrors to correct for phase errors and to improve contrast levels at small angular separations. Improving these techniques, several space and ground based instruments are currently developed using two deformable mirrors to correct for both phase and amplitude errors. However, as wavefront control techniques improve, more complex telescope pupil geometries will soon be a limiting factor for these next generation coronagraphic instru- ments. The technique presented in this proceeding, the Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities method, is taking advantage of the fact that most future coronagraphic instruments will include two deformable mirrors, and is proposing to find the shapes and actuator movements to correct for the effect introduced by these complex pupil geometries. We here present the results of the parametric analysis realized on the WFIRST pupil for which we obtained high contrast levels with several deformable mirror setups (size, separation between them), coronagraphs (Vortex charge 2, vortex charge 4, APLC) and spectral bandwidths. However, because contrast levels and separation are not the only metrics to maximize the scientific return of an instrument, we also included in this study the influence of these deformable mirror shapes on the throughput of the instrument and sensitivity to pointing jitters. Finally, we present results obtained on another potential space based telescope segmented aperture. The main result of this proceeding is that we now obtain comparable performance than the coronagraphs previously designed for WFIRST. First result from the parametric analysis strongly suggest that the 2 deformable mirror set up (size and distance between them) has a important impact on the performance in contrast and throughput of the final instrument.
  • The increasing complexity of the aperture geometry of the future space- and ground based-telescopes will limit the performance of the next generation of coronagraphic instruments for high contrast imaging of exoplanets. We propose here a new closed-loop optimization technique using two deformable mirrors to correct for the effects of complex apertures on coronagraph performance, alternative to the ACAD technique previously developed by our group. This technique, ACAD-OSM, allows the use of any coronagraphs designed for continuous apertures, with complex, segmented, apertures, maintaining high performance in contrast and throughput. We show the capabilities of this technique on several pupil geometries (segmented LUVOIR type aperture, WFIRST, ELTs) for which we obtained high contrast levels with several deformable mirror setups (size, number of actuators, separation between them), coronagraphs (apodized pupil Lyot and vortex coronagraphs) and spectral bandwidths, which will help us present recommendations for future coronagraphic instruments. We show that this active technique handles, without any revision to the algorithm, changing or unknown optical aberrations or discontinuities in the pupil, including optical design misalignments, missing segments and phase errors.
  • High-contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. Instrumentation techniques in this field have greatly improved over the last two decades, with the development of stellar coronagraphy, in parallel with specific methods of wavefront sensing and control. Next generation space- and ground-based telescopes will allow the characterization cold solar-system like planets for the first time and maybe even in situ detection of bio-markers. However, the growth of primary mirror diameters, necessary for these detection, comes with an increase of their complexity (segmentation, secondary mirror features). These discontinuities in the aperture can greatly limit the performance of coronagraphic instruments. In this context, we introduced a new technique, Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities - Optimized Stroke Minimization (ACAD-OSM), to correct for the diffractive effects of aperture discontinuities in the final image plane of a coronagraph, using deformable mirrors. In this paper, we present several tools that can be used to optimize the performance of this technique for its application to future large missions. In particular, we analyze the influence of the deformable setup (size and separating distance) and found that there is an optimal point for this setup, optimizing the performance of the instrument in contrast and throughput while minimizing the strokes applied to the deformable mirrors. These results will help us design future coronagraphic instruments to obtain the best performance.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope recently celebrated 25 years of operation. Some of the first images of extragalactic optical jets were taken by HST in the mid-1990s; with time baselines on the order of 20 years and state-of-the-art astrometry techniques, we are now able to reach accuracies in proper-motion measurements on the order of a tenth of a milliarcsecond per year. We present the results of a recent HST program to measure the kiloparsec-scale proper motions of eleven nearby optical jets with Hubble, the first sample of its kind. When paired with VLBI proper-motion measurements on the parsec scale, we are now able to map the full velocity profile of these jets from near the black hole to the final deceleration as they extend out into and beyond the host galaxy. We see convincing evidence that weak-flavor jets (i.e., FR Is) have a slowly increasing jet speed up to 100 pc from the core, where superluminal components are first seen.
  • The radio galaxy 3C 273 hosts one of the nearest and best-studied powerful quasar jets. Having been imaged repeatedly by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) over the past twenty years, it was chosen for an HST program to measure proper motions in the kiloparsec-scale resolved jets of nearby radio-loud active galaxies. The jet in 3C 273 is highly relativistic on sub-parsec scales, with apparent proper motions up to 15$c$ observed by VLBI (Lister et al., 2013). In contrast, we find that the kpc-scale knots are compatible with being stationary, with a mean speed of $-$0.2$\pm$0.5$c$ over the whole jet. Assuming the knots are packets of moving plasma, an upper limit of 1c implies a bulk Lorentz factor $\Gamma<$2.9. This suggests that the jet has either decelerated significantly by the time it reaches the kpc scale, or that the knots in the jet are standing shock features. The second scenario is incompatible with the inverse Compton off the Cosmic Microwave Background (IC/CMB) model for the X-ray emission of these knots, which requires the knots to be in motion, but IC/CMB is also disfavored in the first scenario due to energetic considerations, in agreement with the recent finding of Meyer & Georganopoulos (2014) which ruled out the IC/CMB model for the X-ray emission of 3C 273 via gamma-ray upper limits.
  • The new frontier in the quest for the highest contrast levels in the focal plane of a coronagraph is now the correction of the large diffractive artifacts effects introduced at the science camera by apertures of increasing complexity. The coronagraph for the WFIRST/AFTA mission will be the first of such instruments in space with a two Deformable Mirrors wavefront control system. Regardless of the control algorithm for these multi Deformable Mirrors, they will have to rely on quick and accurate simulation of the propagation effects introduced by the out-of-pupil surface. In the first part of this paper, we present the analytical description of the different approximations to simulate these propagation effects. In Annex A, we prove analytically that, in the special case of surfaces inducing a converging beam, the Fresnel method yields high fidelity for simulations of these effects. We provide numerical simulations showing this effect. In the second part, we use these tools in the framework of the Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities technique (ACAD) applied to pupil geometries similar to WFIRST-AFTA. We present these simulations in the context of the optical layout of the High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes, which will test ACAD on a optical bench. The results of this analysis show that using the ACAD method, an apodized pupil lyot coronagraph and the performance of our current deformable mirrors, we are able to obtain, in numerically simulations, a dark hole with an AFTA-like pupil. Our numerical simulation shows that we can obtain contrast better than $2.10^{-9}$ in monochromatic light and better than 3.e-8 with 10% bandwidth between 5 and 14 lambda/D.
  • We examine whether charged particles injected by self-annihilating Dark Matter into regions undergoing Diffuse Shock Acceleration (DSA) can be accelerated to high energies. We consider three astrophysical sites where shock acceleration is supposed to occur, namely the Galactic Centre, galaxy clusters and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). For the Milky Way, we find that the acceleration of cosmic rays injected by dark matter could lead to a bump in the cosmic ray spectrum provided that the product of the efficiency of the acceleration mechanism and the concentration of DM particles is high enough. Among the various acceleration sources that we consider (namely supernova remnants (SNRs), Fermi bubbles and AGN jets), we find that the Fermi bubbles are a potentially more efficient accelerator than SNRs. However both could in principle accelerate electrons and protons injected by dark matter to very high energies. At the extragalactic level, the acceleration of dark matter annihilation products could be responsible for enhanced radio emission from colliding clusters and prediction of an increase of the anti-deuteron flux generated near AGNs.
  • We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei at z>1 using new samples. The objects have HST images taken with WFC3 in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z>1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%) radio-loud galaxies at z>1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38% are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z>1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes. We speculate that major BH-BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central supermassive black holes in these objects.
  • The morphology and characteristics of the so-called GeV gamma-ray excess detected in the Milky Way lead us to speculate about a possible common origin with the 511 keV line mapped by the SPI experiment about ten years ago. In the previous version of our paper, we assumed 30 GeV dark matter particles annihilating into $b \bar{b}$ and obtained both a morphology and a 511 keV flux (\phi_{511 keV} ~ 10^{-3} ph/cm^2/s) in agreement with SPI observation. However our estimates assumed a negligible number density of electrons in the bulge which lead to an artificial increase in the flux (mostly due to negligible Coulomb losses in this configuration). Assuming a number density greater than $n_e > 10^{-3} cm^{-3}$, we now obtain a flux of 511 keV photons that is smaller than \phi_{511 keV} ~ 10^{-6} ph/cm^2/s and is essentially in agreement with the 511 keV flux that one can infer from the total number of positrons injected by dark matter annihilations into $b \bar{b}$. We thus conclude that -- even if 30 GeV dark matter particles were to exist-- it is impossible to establish a connexion between the two types of signals, even though they are located within the same 10 deg region in the galactic centre.
  • We search for high redshift ($z\sim$1-2) galaxy clusters using low luminosity radio galaxies (FR~I) as beacons and our newly developed Poisson Probability Method (PPM) based on photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. We use a sample of 32 FR~Is within the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field from Chiaberge et al. (2009) catalog. We derive a reliable subsample of 21 {\it bona fide} Low Luminosity Radio Galaxies (LLRGs) and a subsample of 11 High Luminosity Radio Galaxies (HLRGs), on the basis of photometric redshift information and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) radio fluxes. The LLRGs are selected to have 1.4~GHz rest frame luminosities lower than the fiducial FR~I/FR~II divide. This also allows us to estimate the comoving space density of sources with $L_{1.4}\simeq 10^{32.3}\,\hbox{erg}\,\hbox{s}^{-1}\,\hbox{Hz}^{-1}$ at $z\simeq 1.1$, which strengthens the case for a strong cosmological evolution of these sources. In the fields of the LLRGs and HLRGs we find evidence that 14 and 8 of them reside in rich groups or galaxy clusters, respectively. Thus, overdensities are found around $\sim70\%$ of the FR~Is, independently of the considered subsample. This rate is in agreement with the fraction found for low redshift FR~Is and it is significantly higher than that of FR~IIs at all redshifts. Although our method is primarily introduced for the COSMOS survey, it may be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Furthermore, cluster candidates found with our method are excellent targets for next generation space telescopes such as JWST.
  • We describe a new method (Poisson Probability Method, PPM) to search for high redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for Mpc-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. (2009) sample, that are selected within the COSMOS survey, and on the specific dataset used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. i) We use two z~1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z=2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z=1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. ii) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e. z = 1.0,1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1-sigma redshift accuracy of ~0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g. I<25) are required.
  • We report new results from an HST archival program to study proper motions in the optical jet of the nearby radio galaxy M87. Using over 13 years of archival imaging, we reach accuracies below 0.1c in measuring the apparent velocities of individual knots in the jet. We confirm previous findings of speeds up to 4.5c in the inner 6" of the jet, and report new speeds for optical components in the outer part of the jet. We find evidence of significant motion transverse to the jet axis on the order of 0.6c in the inner jet features, and superluminal velocities parallel and transverse to the jet in the outer knot components, with an apparent ordering of velocity vectors possibly consistent with a helical jet pattern. Previous results suggested a global deceleration over the length of the jet in the form of decreasing maximum speeds of knot components from HST-1 outward, but our results suggest that superluminal speeds persist out to knot C, with large differentials in very nearby features all along the jet. We find significant apparent accelerations in directions parallel and transverse to the jet axis, along with evidence for stationary features in knots D, E, and I. These results are expected to place important constraints on detailed models of kpc-scale relativistic jets.
  • We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum in the optimization topology. We solve the highly non-linear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential Deformable Mirror system and show that high-throughput and high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to JWST, ACAD can attain at least 10^-7 in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for both the future Extremely Large Telescopes and on-axis architectures reminiscent of HST. We show that the converging non-linear mappings resulting from our Deformable Mirror shapes actually damp near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities. Consequently, ACAD is a true broadband solution to the problem of high-contrast imaging with segmented and/or on-axis apertures. We finally show that once the non-linear solution is found, fine tuning with linear methods used in wavefront control can be applied to further contrast by another order of magnitude. Generally speaking, the ACAD technique can be used to significantly improve a broad class of telescope designs for a variety of problems.
  • A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multi-phase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and Schmidt-Kennicutt law residuals. The model is extended to include a multi-phase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central AGN. During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.
  • The cosmological star formation rate in the combined Chandra Deep Fields North and South is derived from our X-Ray Luminosity Function for Galaxies in these Deep Fields. Mild evolution is seen up to redshift order unity with SFR ~ (1 + z)^{2.7}. This is the first directly observed normal star-forming galaxy X-ray luminosity function (XLF) at cosmologically interesting redshifts (z>0). This provides the most direct measure yet of the X-ray derived cosmic star-formation history of the Universe. We make use of Bayesian statistical methods to classify the galaxies and the two types of AGN, finding the most useful discriminators to be the X-ray luminosity, X-ray hardness ratio, and X-ray to optical flux ratio. There is some residual AGN contamination in the sample at the bright end of the luminosity function. Incompleteness slightly flattens the XLF at the faint end of the luminosity function. The XLF has a lognormal distribution and agrees well with the radio and infrared luminosity functions. However, the XLF does not agree with the Schechter luminosity function for the H-alpha LF indicating that additional and different physical processes may be involved in the establishment of the lognormal form of the XLF. The agreement of our star formation history points with the other star formation determinations in different wavebands (IR, Radio, H-alpha) gives an interesting constraint on the IMF, and X-rays may be measuring directly the binary star formation history of the Universe. X-ray studies will continue to be useful for probing the star formation history of the universe by avoiding problems of obscuration. Star formation may therefore be measured in more detail by deep surveys with future x-ray missions.
  • We use numerical simulations to study the evolution of triaxial elliptical galaxies with central black holes. In contrast to earlier numerical studies which used galaxy models with central density ``cores,'' our galaxies have steep central cusps, like those observed in real ellipticals. As a black hole grows in these cuspy triaxial galaxies, the inner regions become rounder owing to chaos induced in the orbit families which populate the model. At larger radii, however, the models maintain their triaxiality, and orbital analyses show that centrophilic orbits there resist stochasticity over many dynamical times. While black hole induced evolution is strong in the inner regions of these galaxies, and reaches out beyond the nominal ``sphere of influence'' of a black hole, our simulations do not show evidence for a rapid {\it global} transformation of the host. The triaxiality of observed elliptical galaxies is therefore not inconsistent with the presence of supermassive black holes at their centers.
  • The thermodynamics of the diffuse, X-ray emitting gas in clusters of galaxies is linked to the entropy level of the intra cluster medium. In particular, models that successfully reproduce the properties of local X-ray clusters and groups require the presence of a minimum value for the entropy in the center of X-ray halos. Such a minimum entropy is most likely generated by non-gravitational processes, in order to produce the observed break in self-similarity of the scaling relations of X-ray halos. At present there is no consensus on the level, the source or the time evolution of this excess entropy. In this paper we describe a strategy to investigate the physics of the heating processes acting in groups and clusters. We show that the best way to extract information from the local data is the observation of the entropy profile at large radii in nearby X-ray halos (z~0.1), both at the upper and lower extremes of the cluster mass scale. The spatially and spectrally resolved observation of such X-ray halos provides information on the mechanism of the heating. We demonstrate how measurements of the size of constant entropy (adiabatic) cores in clusters and groups can directly constrain heating models, and the minimum entropy value. We also consider two specific experiments: the detection of the shock fronts expected at the virial boundary of rich clusters, and the detection of the isentropic, low surface-brightness emission extending to radii larger than the virial ones in low mass clusters and groups. Such observations will be a crucial probe of both the physics of clusters and the relationship of non-gravitational processes to the thermodynamics of the intergalactic medium.
  • We present $N$--body models for triaxial elliptical galaxies or halos of galaxies, which are fully self--gravitating, have near constant axis ratio as a function of radius and a $r^{-1}$ central density cusp. Preliminary investigation suggests the model are stable and orbit analysis shows no indication of chaotic orbits. The models provide a starting point for investigations into the evolution of triaxial figures of equilibrium, response of triaxial figures to central black holes, external perturbations and interactions.
  • Motivated by the observations of high Faraday rotation measures measured in cooling flow clusters we propose a model relevant to plasmas with comparable thermal and magnetic pressures. Magnetic field reconnection may play a major role in changing the topology of the magnetic field in the central cooling flow regions. The effect of the topology change is that cool flux loops can reconnect to hot flux loops that are connected to the overall thermal reservoir of the cluster. There can be a rapid recycling of mass between hot and cold phases on a time scale of 3 x 10^8-10^9 yr which may reduce the inferred inflow and mass condensation rates by at least an order of magnitude. A central multiphase medium is a direct consequence of such a model. Throughout the cooling flow the filling factor of the hot loops (T > 2 x 10^7 K) is of order unity. The filling factor of the cool loops (T < 2 x 10^7 K) is 0.1-1% with a corresponding mass fraction of cold phase of 1-10%. A crucial parameter is the coherence length of the field relative to the cooling radius and the distribution of field energy with scale. When the cooling radius is greater than the field coherence length then cooling flows proceed as usual. When the coherence length is greater than the central cooling radius, however, the thermal energy of the reservoir can be tapped and the mass condensation rates may be very significantly reduced. Three additional conditions must be satisfied: I. Cold loops must be able to fall at least as far as the mean distance between hot loops in a cooling time; II. Loops must enter an evaporative phase on reconnecting; and III. A sufficient number of hot loops penetrate the cold phase region to power the radiative losses.