• Binary embedding is a nonlinear dimension reduction methodology where high dimensional data are embedded into the Hamming cube while preserving the structure of the original space. Specifically, for an arbitrary $N$ distinct points in $\mathbb{S}^{p-1}$, our goal is to encode each point using $m$-dimensional binary strings such that we can reconstruct their geodesic distance up to $\delta$ uniform distortion. Existing binary embedding algorithms either lack theoretical guarantees or suffer from running time $O\big(mp\big)$. We make three contributions: (1) we establish a lower bound that shows any binary embedding oblivious to the set of points requires $m = \Omega(\frac{1}{\delta^2}\log{N})$ bits and a similar lower bound for non-oblivious embeddings into Hamming distance; (2) [DELETED, see comment]; (3) we also provide an analytic result about embedding a general set of points $K \subseteq \mathbb{S}^{p-1}$ with even infinite size. Our theoretical findings are supported through experiments on both synthetic and real data sets.
  • We introduce a new malware detector - Shape-GD - that aggregates per-machine detectors into a robust global detector. Shape-GD is based on two insights: 1. Structural: actions such as visiting a website (waterhole attack) by nodes correlate well with malware spread, and create dynamic neighborhoods of nodes that were exposed to the same attack vector. However, neighborhood sizes vary unpredictably and require aggregating an unpredictable number of local detectors' outputs into a global alert. 2. Statistical: feature vectors corresponding to true and false positives of local detectors have markedly different conditional distributions - i.e. their shapes differ. The shape of neighborhoods can identify infected neighborhoods without having to estimate neighborhood sizes - on 5 years of Symantec detectors' logs, Shape-GD reduces false positives from ~1M down to ~110K and raises alerts 345 days (on average) before commercial anti-virus products; in a waterhole attack simulated using Yahoo web-service logs, Shape-GD detects infected machines when only ~100 of ~550K are compromised.
  • Motivated by the study of controlling (curing) epidemics, we consider the spread of an SI process on a known graph, where we have a limited budget to use to transition infected nodes back to the susceptible state (i.e., to cure nodes). Recent work has demonstrated that under perfect and instantaneous information (which nodes are/are not infected), the budget required for curing a graph precisely depends on a combinatorial property called the CutWidth. We show that this assumption is in fact necessary: even a minor degradation of perfect information, e.g., a diagnostic test that is 99% accurate, drastically alters the landscape. Infections that could previously be cured in sublinear time now may require exponential time, or orderwise larger budget to cure. The crux of the issue comes down to a tension not present in the full information case: if a node is suspected (but not certain) to be infected, do we risk wasting our budget to try to cure an uninfected node, or increase our certainty by longer observation, at the risk that the infection spreads further? Our results present fundamental, algorithm-independent bounds that tradeoff budget required vs. uncertainty.
  • Behavioral malware detectors promise to expose previously unknown malware and are an important security primitive. However, even the best behavioral detectors suffer from high false positives and negatives. In this paper, we address the challenge of aggregating weak per-device behavioral detectors in noisy communities (i.e., ones that produce alerts at unpredictable rates) into an accurate and robust global anomaly detector (GD). Our system - Shape GD - combines two insights: Structural: actions such as visiting a website (waterhole attack) or membership in a shared email thread (phishing attack) by nodes correlate well with malware spread, and create dynamic neighborhoods of nodes that were exposed to the same attack vector; and Statistical: feature vectors corresponding to true and false positives of local detectors have markedly different conditional distributions. We use neighborhoods to amplify the transient low-dimensional structure that is latent in high-dimensional feature vectors - but neighborhoods vary unpredictably, and we use shape to extract robust neighborhood-level features that identify infected neighborhoods. Unlike prior works that aggregate local detectors' alert bitstreams or cluster the feature vectors, Shape GD analyzes the feature vectors that led to local alerts (alert-FVs) to separate true and false positives. Shape GD first filters these alert-FVs into neighborhoods and efficiently maps a neighborhood's alert-FVs' statistical shapes into a scalar score. Shape GD then acts as a neighborhood level anomaly detector - training on benign program traces to learn the ShapeScore of false positive neighborhoods, and classifying neighborhoods with anomalous ShapeScores as malicious. Shape GD detects malware early (~100 infected nodes in a ~100K node system for waterhole and ~10 of 1000 for phishing) and robustly (with ~100% global TP and ~1% global FP rates).
  • We present a novel method for frequentist statistical inference in $M$-estimation problems, based on stochastic gradient descent (SGD) with a fixed step size: we demonstrate that the average of such SGD sequences can be used for statistical inference, after proper scaling. An intuitive analysis using the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process suggests that such averages are asymptotically normal. From a practical perspective, our SGD-based inference procedure is a first order method, and is well-suited for large scale problems. To show its merits, we apply it to both synthetic and real datasets, and demonstrate that its accuracy is comparable to classical statistical methods, while requiring potentially far less computation.
  • A rank-$r$ matrix $X \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times n}$ can be written as a product $U V^\top$, where $U \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times r}$ and $V \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times r}$. One could exploit this observation in optimization: e.g., consider the minimization of a convex function $f(X)$ over rank-$r$ matrices, where the set of rank-$r$ matrices is modeled via the factorization $UV^\top$. Though such parameterization reduces the number of variables, and is more computationally efficient (of particular interest is the case $r \ll \min\{m, n\}$), it comes at a cost: $f(UV^\top)$ becomes a non-convex function w.r.t. $U$ and $V$. We study such parameterization for optimization of generic convex objectives $f$, and focus on first-order, gradient descent algorithmic solutions. We propose the Bi-Factored Gradient Descent (BFGD) algorithm, an efficient first-order method that operates on the $U, V$ factors. We show that when $f$ is (restricted) smooth, BFGD has local sublinear convergence, and linear convergence when $f$ is both (restricted) smooth and (restricted) strongly convex. For several key applications, we provide simple and efficient initialization schemes that provide approximate solutions good enough for the above convergence results to hold.
  • We study the projected gradient descent method on low-rank matrix problems with a strongly convex objective. We use the Burer-Monteiro factorization approach to implicitly enforce low-rankness; such factorization introduces non-convexity in the objective. We focus on constraint sets that include both positive semi-definite (PSD) constraints and specific matrix norm-constraints. Such criteria appear in quantum state tomography and phase retrieval applications. We show that non-convex projected gradient descent favors local linear convergence in the factored space. We build our theory on a novel descent lemma, that non-trivially extends recent results on the unconstrained problem. The resulting algorithm is Projected Factored Gradient Descent, abbreviated as ProjFGD, and shows superior performance compared to state of the art on quantum state tomography and sparse phase retrieval applications.
  • We consider the non-square matrix sensing problem, under restricted isometry property (RIP) assumptions. We focus on the non-convex formulation, where any rank-$r$ matrix $X \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times n}$ is represented as $UV^\top$, where $U \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times r}$ and $V \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times r}$. In this paper, we complement recent findings on the non-convex geometry of the analogous PSD setting [5], and show that matrix factorization does not introduce any spurious local minima, under RIP.
  • We consider the problem of Robust PCA in the fully and partially observed settings. Without corruptions, this is the well-known matrix completion problem. From a statistical standpoint this problem has been recently well-studied, and conditions on when recovery is possible (how many observations do we need, how many corruptions can we tolerate) via polynomial-time algorithms is by now understood. This paper presents and analyzes a non-convex optimization approach that greatly reduces the computational complexity of the above problems, compared to the best available algorithms. In particular, in the fully observed case, with $r$ denoting rank and $d$ dimension, we reduce the complexity from $\mathcal{O}(r^2d^2\log(1/\varepsilon))$ to $\mathcal{O}(rd^2\log(1/\varepsilon))$ -- a big savings when the rank is big. For the partially observed case, we show the complexity of our algorithm is no more than $\mathcal{O}(r^4d \log d \log(1/\varepsilon))$. Not only is this the best-known run-time for a provable algorithm under partial observation, but in the setting where $r$ is small compared to $d$, it also allows for near-linear-in-$d$ run-time that can be exploited in the fully-observed case as well, by simply running our algorithm on a subset of the observations.
  • We consider the problem of solving mixed random linear equations with $k$ components. This is the noiseless setting of mixed linear regression. The goal is to estimate multiple linear models from mixed samples in the case where the labels (which sample corresponds to which model) are not observed. We give a tractable algorithm for the mixed linear equation problem, and show that under some technical conditions, our algorithm is guaranteed to solve the problem exactly with sample complexity linear in the dimension, and polynomial in $k$, the number of components. Previous approaches have required either exponential dependence on $k$, or super-linear dependence on the dimension. The proposed algorithm is a combination of tensor decomposition and alternating minimization. Our analysis involves proving that the initialization provided by the tensor method allows alternating minimization, which is equivalent to EM in our setting, to converge to the global optimum at a linear rate.
  • This paper considers the problem of matrix completion when some number of the columns are completely and arbitrarily corrupted, potentially by a malicious adversary. It is well-known that standard algorithms for matrix completion can return arbitrarily poor results, if even a single column is corrupted. One direct application comes from robust collaborative filtering. Here, some number of users are so-called manipulators who try to skew the predictions of the algorithm by calibrating their inputs to the system. In this paper, we develop an efficient algorithm for this problem based on a combination of a trimming procedure and a convex program that minimizes the nuclear norm and the $\ell_{1,2}$ norm. Our theoretical results show that given a vanishing fraction of observed entries, it is nevertheless possible to complete the underlying matrix even when the number of corrupted columns grows. Significantly, our results hold without any assumptions on the locations or values of the observed entries of the manipulated columns. Moreover, we show by an information-theoretic argument that our guarantees are nearly optimal in terms of the fraction of sampled entries on the authentic columns, the fraction of corrupted columns, and the rank of the underlying matrix. Our results therefore sharply characterize the tradeoffs between sample, robustness and rank in matrix completion.
  • Two key traits of 5G cellular networks are much higher base station (BS) densities - especially in the case of low-power BSs - and the use of massive MIMO at these BSs. This paper explores how massive MIMO can be used to jointly maximize the offloading gains and minimize the interference challenges arising from adding small cells. We consider two interference management approaches: joint transmission (JT) with local precoding, where users are served simultaneously by multiple BSs without requiring channel state information exchanges among cooperating BSs, and resource blanking, where some macro BS resources are left blank to reduce the interference in the small cell downlink. A key advantage offered by massive MIMO is channel hardening, which enables to predict instantaneous rates a priori. This allows us to develop a unified framework, where resource allocation is cast as a network utility maximization (NUM) problem, and to demonstrate large gains in cell-edge rates based on the NUM solution. We propose an efficient dual subgradient based algorithm, which converges towards the NUM solution. A scheduling scheme is also proposed to approach the NUM solution. Simulations illustrate more than 2x rate gain for 10th percentile users vs. an optimal association without interference management.
  • Latent variable models are a fundamental modeling tool in machine learning applications, but they present significant computational and analytical challenges. The popular EM algorithm and its variants, is a much used algorithmic tool; yet our rigorous understanding of its performance is highly incomplete. Recently, work in Balakrishnan et al. (2014) has demonstrated that for an important class of problems, EM exhibits linear local convergence. In the high-dimensional setting, however, the M-step may not be well defined. We address precisely this setting through a unified treatment using regularization. While regularization for high-dimensional problems is by now well understood, the iterative EM algorithm requires a careful balancing of making progress towards the solution while identifying the right structure (e.g., sparsity or low-rank). In particular, regularizing the M-step using the state-of-the-art high-dimensional prescriptions (e.g., Wainwright (2014)) is not guaranteed to provide this balance. Our algorithm and analysis are linked in a way that reveals the balance between optimization and statistical errors. We specialize our general framework to sparse gaussian mixture models, high-dimensional mixed regression, and regression with missing variables, obtaining statistical guarantees for each of these examples.
  • Linear regression studies the problem of estimating a model parameter $\beta^* \in \mathbb{R}^p$, from $n$ observations $\{(y_i,\mathbf{x}_i)\}_{i=1}^n$ from linear model $y_i = \langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle + \epsilon_i$. We consider a significant generalization in which the relationship between $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$ and $y_i$ is noisy, quantized to a single bit, potentially nonlinear, noninvertible, as well as unknown. This model is known as the single-index model in statistics, and, among other things, it represents a significant generalization of one-bit compressed sensing. We propose a novel spectral-based estimation procedure and show that we can recover $\beta^*$ in settings (i.e., classes of link function $f$) where previous algorithms fail. In general, our algorithm requires only very mild restrictions on the (unknown) functional relationship between $y_i$ and $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$. We also consider the high dimensional setting where $\beta^*$ is sparse ,and introduce a two-stage nonconvex framework that addresses estimation challenges in high dimensional regimes where $p \gg n$. For a broad class of link functions between $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$ and $y_i$, we establish minimax lower bounds that demonstrate the optimality of our estimators in both the classical and high dimensional regimes.
  • We consider a server serving a time-slotted queued system of multiple packet-based flows, with exogenous packet arrivals and time-varying service rates. At each time, the server can observe instantaneous service rates for only a subset of flows (from within a fixed collection of observable subsets) before scheduling a flow in the subset for service. We are interested in queue-length aware scheduling to keep the queues short, and develop scheduling algorithms that use only partial service rate information from subsets of channels to minimize the likelihood of queue overflow in the system. Specifically, we present a new joint subset-sampling and scheduling algorithm called Max-Exp that uses only the current queue lengths to pick a subset of flows, and subsequently schedules a flow using the Exponential rule. When the collection of observable subsets is disjoint, we show that Max-Exp achieves the best exponential decay rate, among all scheduling algorithms using partial information, of the tail of the longest queue in the system. Towards this, we employ novel analytical techniques for studying the performance of scheduling algorithms using partial state, which may be of independent interest. These include new sample-path large deviations results for processes obtained by non-random, predictable sampling of sequences of independent and identically distributed random variables. A consequence of these results is that scheduling with partial state information yields a rate function significantly different from scheduling with full channel information. In the special case when the observable subsets are singleton flows, i.e., when there is effectively no a priori channel-state information, Max-Exp reduces to simply serving the flow with the longest queue; thus, our results show that to always serve the longest queue in the absence of any channel-state information is large-deviations optimal.
  • Many models for sparse regression typically assume that the covariates are known completely, and without noise. Particularly in high-dimensional applications, this is often not the case. This paper develops efficient OMP-like algorithms to deal with precisely this setting. Our algorithms are as efficient as OMP, and improve on the best-known results for missing and noisy data in regression, both in the high-dimensional setting where we seek to recover a sparse vector from only a few measurements, and in the classical low-dimensional setting where we recover an unstructured regressor. In the high-dimensional setting, our support-recovery algorithm requires no knowledge of even the statistics of the noise. Along the way, we also obtain improved performance guarantees for OMP for the standard sparse regression problem with Gaussian noise.
  • We propose FrogWild, a novel algorithm for fast approximation of high PageRank vertices, geared towards reducing network costs of running traditional PageRank algorithms. Our algorithm can be seen as a quantized version of power iteration that performs multiple parallel random walks over a directed graph. One important innovation is that we introduce a modification to the GraphLab framework that only partially synchronizes mirror vertices. This partial synchronization vastly reduces the network traffic generated by traditional PageRank algorithms, thus greatly reducing the per-iteration cost of PageRank. On the other hand, this partial synchronization also creates dependencies between the random walks used to estimate PageRank. Our main theoretical innovation is the analysis of the correlations introduced by this partial synchronization process and a bound establishing that our approximation is close to the true PageRank vector. We implement our algorithm in GraphLab and compare it against the default PageRank implementation. We show that our algorithm is very fast, performing each iteration in less than one second on the Twitter graph and can be up to 7x faster compared to the standard GraphLab PageRank implementation.
  • We consider the mixed regression problem with two components, under adversarial and stochastic noise. We give a convex optimization formulation that provably recovers the true solution, and provide upper bounds on the recovery errors for both arbitrary noise and stochastic noise settings. We also give matching minimax lower bounds (up to log factors), showing that under certain assumptions, our algorithm is information-theoretically optimal. Our results represent the first tractable algorithm guaranteeing successful recovery with tight bounds on recovery errors and sample complexity.
  • Cellular network performance can significantly benefit from direct device-to-device (D2D) communication, but interference from cochannel D2D communication limits the performance gain. In hybrid networks consisting of D2D and cellular links, finding the optimal interference management is challenging. In particular, we show that the problem of maximizing network throughput while guaranteeing predefined service levels to cellular users is non- convex and hence intractable. Instead, we adopt a distributed approach that is computationally extremely efficient, and requires minimal coordination, communication and cooperation among the nodes. The key algorithmic idea is a signaling mechanism that can be seen as a fictional pricing mechanism, that the base stations optimize and transmit to the D2D users, who then play a best response (i.e., selfishly) to this signal. Numerical results show that our algorithms converge quickly, have low overhead, and achieve a significant throughput gain, while maintaining the quality of cellular links at a predefined service level.
  • We consider the problem of subspace clustering: given points that lie on or near the union of many low-dimensional linear subspaces, recover the subspaces. To this end, one first identifies sets of points close to the same subspace and uses the sets to estimate the subspaces. As the geometric structure of the clusters (linear subspaces) forbids proper performance of general distance based approaches such as K-means, many model-specific methods have been proposed. In this paper, we provide new simple and efficient algorithms for this problem. Our statistical analysis shows that the algorithms are guaranteed exact (perfect) clustering performance under certain conditions on the number of points and the affinity between subspaces. These conditions are weaker than those considered in the standard statistical literature. Experimental results on synthetic data generated from the standard unions of subspaces model demonstrate our theory. We also show that our algorithm performs competitively against state-of-the-art algorithms on real-world applications such as motion segmentation and face clustering, with much simpler implementation and lower computational cost.
  • We develop a flexible and accurate framework for device-to-device (D2D) communication in the context of a conventional cellular network, which allows for time-frequency resources to be either shared or orthogonally partitioned between the two networks. Using stochastic geometry, we provide accurate expressions for SINR distributions and average rates, under an assumption of interference randomization via time and/or frequency hopping, for both dedicated and shared spectrum approaches. We obtain analytical results in closed or semi-closed form in high SNR regime, that allow us to easily explore the impact of key parameters (e.g., the load and hopping probabilities) on the network performance. In particular, unlike other models, the expressions we obtain are tractable, i.e., they can be efficiently optimized without extensive simulation. Using these, we optimize the hopping probabilities for the D2D links, i.e., how often they should request a time or frequency slot. This can be viewed as an optimized lower bound to other more sophisticated scheduling schemes. We also investigate the optimal resource partitions between D2D and cellular networks when they use orthogonal resources.
  • Mixed linear regression involves the recovery of two (or more) unknown vectors from unlabeled linear measurements; that is, where each sample comes from exactly one of the vectors, but we do not know which one. It is a classic problem, and the natural and empirically most popular approach to its solution has been the EM algorithm. As in other settings, this is prone to bad local minima; however, each iteration is very fast (alternating between guessing labels, and solving with those labels). In this paper we provide a new initialization procedure for EM, based on finding the leading two eigenvectors of an appropriate matrix. We then show that with this, a re-sampled version of the EM algorithm provably converges to the correct vectors, under natural assumptions on the sampling distribution, and with nearly optimal (unimprovable) sample complexity. This provides not only the first characterization of EM's performance, but also much lower sample complexity as compared to both standard (randomly initialized) EM, and other methods for this problem.
  • We consider the problem of detecting an epidemic in a population where individual diagnoses are extremely noisy. The motivation for this problem is the plethora of examples (influenza strains in humans, or computer viruses in smartphones, etc.) where reliable diagnoses are scarce, but noisy data plentiful. In flu/phone-viruses, exceedingly few infected people/phones are professionally diagnosed (only a small fraction go to a doctor) but less reliable secondary signatures (e.g., people staying home, or greater-than-typical upload activity) are more readily available. These secondary data are often plagued by unreliability: many people with the flu do not stay home, and many people that stay home do not have the flu. This paper identifies the precise regime where knowledge of the contact network enables finding the needle in the haystack: we provide a distributed, efficient and robust algorithm that can correctly identify the existence of a spreading epidemic from highly unreliable local data. Our algorithm requires only local-neighbor knowledge of this graph, and in a broad array of settings that we describe, succeeds even when false negatives and false positives make up an overwhelming fraction of the data available. Our results show it succeeds in the presence of partial information about the contact network, and also when there is not a single "patient zero", but rather many (hundreds, in our examples) of initial patient-zeroes, spread across the graph.
  • Newly developed HTTP-based video streaming technologies enable flexible rate-adaptation under varying channel conditions. Accurately predicting the users' Quality of Experience (QoE) for rate-adaptive HTTP video streams is thus critical to achieve efficiency. An important aspect of understanding and modeling QoE is predicting the up-to-the-moment subjective quality of a video as it is played, which is difficult due to hysteresis effects and nonlinearities in human behavioral responses. This paper presents a Hammerstein-Wiener model for predicting the time-varying subjective quality (TVSQ) of rate-adaptive videos. To collect data for model parameterization and validation, a database of longer-duration videos with time-varying distortions was built and the TVSQs of the videos were measured in a large-scale subjective study. The proposed method is able to reliably predict the TVSQ of rate adaptive videos. Since the Hammerstein-Wiener model has a very simple structure, the proposed method is suitable for on-line TVSQ prediction in HTTP based streaming.
  • Real-time video demands quality-of-service (QoS) guarantees such as delay bounds for end-user satisfaction. Furthermore, the tolerable delay varies depending on the use case such as live streaming or two-way video conferencing. Due to the inherently stochastic nature of wireless fading channels, deterministic delay bounds are difficult to guarantee. Instead, we propose providing statistical delay guarantees using the concept of effective capacity. We consider a multiuser setup whereby different users have (possibly different) delay QoS constraints. We derive the resource allocation policy that maximizes the sum video quality and applies to any quality metric with concave rate-quality mapping. We show that the optimal operating point per user is such that the rate-distortion slope is the inverse of the supported video source rate per unit bandwidth, a key metric we refer to as the source spectral efficiency. We also solve the alternative problem of fairness-based resource allocation whereby the objective is to maximize the minimum video quality across users. Finally, we derive user admission and scheduling policies that enable selecting a maximal user subset such that all selected users can meet their statistical delay requirement. Results show that video users with differentiated QoS requirements can achieve similar video quality with vastly different resource requirements. Thus, QoS-aware scheduling and resource allocation enable supporting significantly more users under the same resource constraints.