• Intense, single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses offer a promising approach for understanding and controlling the properties of a material on an ultrafast time scale. In particular, resonantly exciting phonons leads to a better understanding of how they couple to other degrees of freedom in the material (e.g., ferroelectricity, conductivity and magnetism) while enabling coherent control of lattice vibrations and the symmetry changes associated with them. However, an ultrafast method for observing the resulting structural changes at the atomic scale is essential for studying phonon dynamics. A simple approach for doing this is optical second harmonic generation (SHG), a technique with remarkable sensitivity to crystalline symmetry in the bulk of a material as well as at surfaces and interfaces. This makes SHG an ideal method for probing phonon dynamics in topological insulators (TI), materials with unique surface transport properties. Here, we resonantly excite a polar phonon mode in the canonical TI Bi$_2$Se$_3$ with intense THz pulses and probe the subsequent response with SHG. This enables us to separate the photoinduced lattice dynamics at the surface from transient inversion symmetry breaking in the bulk. Furthermore, we coherently control the phonon oscillations by varying the time delay between a pair of driving THz pulses. Our work thus demonstrates a versatile, table-top tool for probing and controlling ultrafast phonon dynamics in materials, particularly at surfaces and interfaces, such as that between a TI and a magnetic material, where exotic new states of matter are predicted to exist.
  • We have studied the sub-picosecond quasiparticle dynamics in the perovskite manganite La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 and the layered manganite La1.4Sr1.6Mn2O7 using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. We found that for T > TC, initial relaxation proceeds on the time scale of several hundred femtoseconds and corresponds to the redressing of a photoexcited electron to its polaronic ground state. The temperature and dimensionality dependence of this polaron redressing time provides insight into the relationship between polaronic motion and spin dynamics on a sub-picosecond time scale. We also observe a crossover to a more conventional electron-phonon relaxation in the ferromagnetic metallic phase below Tc.
  • Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron-hole pair excitations can give rise to a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in a variety of systems, such as stripe-phase nickelates, graphene and high-$T_{c}$ superconductors. Here, we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active $A_1$ phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points (Weyl fermions) through the observation of a Fano resonance in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resultant asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously as the temperature increases. This anomalous behavior originates from the suppression of the electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level ($E_{F}$) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above $E_{F}$. Our findings not only elucidate the underlying mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance, but also open a new route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through the properties of phonons in Weyl semimetals.
  • We investigate spin dynamics in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) multiferroic TbMnO3 using optical- pump, terahertz (THz)-probe spectroscopy. Photoexcitation results in a broadband THz transmission change, with an onset time of 25 ps at 6 K that becomes faster at higher temperatures. We attribute this time constant to spin-lattice thermalization. The excellent agreement between our measurements and previous ultrafast resonant x-ray diffraction measurements on the same material confirms that our THz pulse directly probes spin order. We suggest that this could be the case in general for insulating AFM materials, if the origin of the static absorption in the THz spectral range is magnetic.
  • We demonstrate a new approach for directly measuring the ultrafast energy transfer between elec- trons and magnons, enabling us to track spin dynamics in an antiferromagnet (AFM). In multiferroic HoMnO3, optical photoexcitation creates hot electrons, after which changes in the spin order are probed with a THz pulse tuned to a magnon resonance. This reveals a photoinduced transparency, which builds up over several picoseconds as the spins heat up due to energy transfer from hot elec- trons via phonons. This spin-lattice thermalization time is ?10 times faster than that of typical ferromagnetic (FM) manganites. We qualitatively explain the fundamental differences in spin-lattice thermalization between FM and AFM systems and apply a Boltzmann equation model for treating AFMs. Our work gives new insight into spin-lattice thermalization in AFMs and demonstrates a new approach for directly monitoring the ultrafast dynamics of spin order in these systems.
  • We report electric polarization and magnetization measurements in single crystals of double perovskite Lu2MnCoO6 using pulsed magnetic fields and optical second harmonic generation (SHG) in DC magnetic fields. we observe well-resolved magnetic field-induced changes in the electric polarization in single crystals and thereby resolve the question about whether multiferroic behavior is intrinsic to these materials or an extrinsic feature of polycrystals. We find electric polarization along the crystalline b-axis, that is suppressed by applying a magnetic fields along c-axis and advance a model for the origin of magnetoelectric coupling. We furthermore map the phase diagram using both capacitance and electric polarization to identify regions of ordering and regions of magnetoelectric hysteresis. This compound is a rare example of coupled hysteretic behavior in the magnetic and electric properties. The ferromagnetic-like magnetic hysteresis loop that couples to hysteretic polarization can be attributed not to ordinary ferromagnetic domains, but to the rich physics of magnetic frustration of Ising-like spins in the axial next-nearest neighbor interaction model.
  • We systematically measured the Hall effect in the extremely large magnetoresistance semimetal WTe$_2$. By carefully fitting the Hall resistivity to a two-band model, the temperature dependencies of the carrier density and mobility for both electron- and hole-type carriers were determined. We observed a sudden increase of the hole density below $\sim$160~K, which is likely associated with the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition reported by a previous photoemission study. In addition, a more pronounced reduction in electron density occurs below 50~K, giving rise to comparable electron and hole densities at low temperature. Our observations indicate a possible electronic structure change below 50~K, which might be the direct driving force of the electron-hole ``compensation'' and the extremely large magnetoresistance as well. Numerical simulations imply that this material is unlikely to be a perfectly compensated system.
  • Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to track carrier dynamics in the large magnetoresistance material WTe$_{2}$. Our experiments reveal a fast relaxation process occurring on a sub-picosecond time scale that is caused by electron-phonon thermalization, allowing us to extract the electron-phonon coupling constant. An additional slower relaxation process, occurring on a time scale of $\sim$5-15 picoseconds, is attributed to phonon-assisted electron-hole recombination. As the temperature decreases from 300 K, the timescale governing this process increases due to the reduction of the phonon population. However, below $\sim$50 K, an unusual decrease of the recombination time sets in, most likely due to a change in the electronic structure that has been linked to the large magnetoresistance observed in this material.
  • We present a systematic study of both the temperature and frequency dependence of the optical response in TaAs, a material that has recently been realized to host the Weyl semimetal state. Our study reveals that the optical conductivity of TaAs features a narrow Drude response alongside a conspicuous linear dependence on frequency. The width of the Drude peak decreases upon cooling, following a $T^{2}$ temperature dependence which is expected for Weyl semimetals. Two linear components with distinct slopes dominate the 5-K optical conductivity. A comparison between our experimental results and theoretical calculations suggests that the linear conductivity below $\sim$230~cm$^{-1}$ is a clear signature of the Weyl points lying in very close proximity to the Fermi energy.
  • Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials possess spontaneous electric and magnetic order, respectively, which can be switched by the corresponding applied electric and magnetic fields. Multiferroics combine these properties in a single material, providing an avenue for controlling electric polarization with a magnetic field and magnetism with an electric field. These materials have been intensively studied in recent years, both for their fundamental scientific interest as well as their potential applications in a broad range of magnetoelectric devices [1, 2, 3, 4]. However, the microscopic origins of magnetism and ferroelectricity are quite different, and the mechanisms producing strong coupling between them are not always well understood. Hence, gaining a deeper understanding of magnetoelectric coupling in these materials is the key to their rational design. Here, we use ultrafast optical spectroscopy to show that quantum charge fluctuations can govern the interplay between electric polarization and magnetic ordering in the charge-ordered multiferroic LuFe2O4.