• Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are old neutron stars that spin hundreds of times per second and appear to pulsate as their emission beams cross our line of sight. To date, radio pulsations have been detected from all rotation-powered MSPs. In an attempt to discover radio-quiet gamma-ray MSPs, we used the aggregated power from the computers of tens of thousands of volunteers participating in the Einstein@Home distributed computing project to search for pulsations from unidentified gamma-ray sources in Fermi Large Area Telescope data. This survey discovered two isolated MSPs, one of which is the only known rotation-powered MSP to remain undetected in radio observations. These gamma-ray MSPs were discovered in completely blind searches without prior constraints from other observations, raising hopes for detecting MSPs from a predicted Galactic bulge population.
  • We report the discovery of two transiting planetary systems: a super dense, sub-Jupiter mass planet WASP-86b (\mpl\ = 0.82 $\pm$ 0.06 \mj, \rpl\ = 0.63 $\pm$ 0.01 \rj), and a bloated, Saturn-like planet WASP-102b (\mpl\ = 0.62 $\pm$ 0.04 \mj, \rpl\=1.27 $\pm$ 0.03 \rj). They orbit their host star every $\sim$5.03, and $\sim$2.71 days, respectively. The planet hosting WASP-86 is a F7 star (\teff\ = 6330$\pm$110 K, \feh\ = $+$0.23 $\pm$ 0.14 dex, and age $\sim$0.8--1~Gyr), WASP-102 is a G0 star (\teff\ = 5940$\pm$140 K, \feh\ = $-$0.09$\pm$ 0.19 dex, and age $\sim$1~Gyr). These two systems highlight the diversity of planetary radii over similar masses for giant planets with masses between Saturn and Jupiter. WASP-102b shows a larger than model-predicted radius, indicating that the planet is receiving a strong incident flux which contributes to the inflation of its radius. On the other hand, with a density of $\rho_{pl}$ = 3.24$\pm$~0.3~$\rho_{jup}$, WASP-86b is the densest gas giant planet among planets with masses in the range 0.05 $<M$_{pl}$<$ 2.0 \mj. With a stellar mass of 1.34 M$_{\odot}$ and \feh = $+$0.23 dex, WASP-86 could host additional massive and dense planets given that its protoplanetary disc is expected to also have been enriched with heavy elements. In order to match WASP-86b's density, an extrapolation of theoretical models predicts a planet composition of more than 80\% in heavy elements (whether confined in a core or mixed in the envelope). This fraction corresponds to a core mass of approximately 210\me\ for WASP-86b's mass of \mpl$\sim$260\,\me. Only planets with masses larger than about 2\mj\ have larger densities than that of WASP-86b, making it exceptional in its mass range.
  • We have constructed an asymmetric matter-wave beam splitter and a ring potential on an atom chip with Bose-Einstein condensates using radio-frequency dressing. By applying rf-field parallel to the quantization axis in the vicinity of the static trap minima added to perpendicular rf-fields, versatile controllability on the potentials is realized. Asymmetry of the rf-induced double well is manipulated without discernible displacement of the each well along horizontal and vertical direction. Formation of an isotropic ring potential on an atom chip is achieved by compensating the gradient due to gravity and inhomogeneous coupling strength. In addition, position and rotation velocity of a BEC along the ring geometry are controlled by the relative phase and the frequency difference between the rf-fields, respectively.
  • We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422-6138, J1522-5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the range $6\times10^{34}$ - $10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$. They are located in the Galactic plane and have rotation rates of less than 10 Hz, among which the 2.1 Hz spin frequency of PSR J0554+3107 is the slowest of any known gamma-ray pulsar. For two of the new pulsars, we find supernova remnants coincident on the sky and discuss the plausibility of such associations. Deep radio follow-up observations found no pulsations, suggesting that all four pulsars are radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. These discoveries, the first gamma-ray pulsars found by volunteer computing, motivate continued blind pulsar searches of the many other unidentified LAT gamma-ray sources.
  • The production of molecules in a chemical reaction network is modelled as a Poisson process with a Markov-modulated arrival rate and an exponential decay rate. We analyze the distributional properties of $M$, the number of molecules, under specific time-scaling; the background process is sped up by $N^{\alpha}$, the arrival rates are scaled by $N$, for $N$ large. A functional central limit theorem is derived for $M$, which after centering and scaling, converges to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. A dichotomy depending on $\alpha$ is observed. For $\alpha\leq1$ the parameters of the limiting process contain the deviation matrix associated with the background process.
  • We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of approximately 17000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop/s. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, of which 18 were isolated pulsars, and six were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (approximately 420 pc/cc). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.
  • Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein@Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but can not prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least ~ 100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.
  • We examine the response of a dense colloidal suspension to a local force applied by a small magnetic bead. For small forces, we find a linear relationship between the force and the displacement, suggesting the medium is elastic, even though our colloidal samples macroscopically behave as fluids. We interpret this as a measure of the strength of colloidal caging, reflecting the proximity of the samples' volume fractions to the colloidal glass transition. The strain field of the colloidal particles surrounding the magnetic probe appears similar to that of an isotropic homogeneous elastic medium. When the applied force is removed, the strain relaxes as a stretched exponential in time. We introduce a model that suggests this behavior is due to the diffusive relaxation of strain in the colloidal sample.
  • We use a combination of charge writing and scanning gate microscopy to map and modify the local charge neutrality point of graphene field-effect devices. We give a demonstration of the technique by writing remote charge in a thin dielectric layer over the graphene-metal interface and detecting the resulting shift in local charge neutrality point. We perform electrostatic simulations to characterize the gating effect of a realistic scanning probe tip on a graphene bilayer and find a good agreement with the experimental results.
  • Single-electron circuits of the future, consisting of a network of quantum dots, will require a mechanism to transport electrons from one functional part to another. For example, in a quantum computer[1] decoherence and circuit complexity can be reduced by separating qubit manipulation from measurement and by providing some means to transport electrons from one to the other.[2] Tunnelling between neighbouring dots has been demonstrated[3, 4] with great control, and the manipulation of electrons in single and double-dot systems is advancing rapidly.[5-8] For distances greater than a few hundred nanometres neither free propagation nor tunnelling are viable whilst maintaining confinement of single electrons. Here we show how a single electron may be captured in a surface acoustic wave minimum and transferred from one quantum dot to a second unoccupied dot along a long empty channel. The transfer direction may be reversed and the same electron moved back and forth over sixty times without error, a cumulative distance of 0.25 mm. Such on-chip transfer extends communication between quantum dots to a range that may allow the integration of discrete quantum information-processing components and devices.
  • An investigation is made of multi-hump and periodic solutions of the semi-classical coupled equations describing laser radiation copropagating with a Bose-Einstein condensate. Solutions reminiscent of optical vector solitons have been found and have been used to gain understanding of the dynamics observed in the numerical simulations, in particular to shed light on the phenomenon of jet emission from a condensate interacting with a laser.
  • We report the discovery of the 20.7 ms binary pulsar J1952+2630, made using the distributed computing project Einstein@Home in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Follow-up observations with the Arecibo telescope confirm the binary nature of the system. We obtain a circular orbital solution with an orbital period of 9.4 hr, a projected orbital radius of 2.8 lt-s, and a mass function of f = 0.15 solar masses by analysis of spin period measurements. No evidence of orbital eccentricity is apparent; we set a 2-sigma upper limit e < 1.7e-3. The orbital parameters suggest a massive white dwarf companion with a minimum mass of 0.95 solar masses, assuming a pulsar mass of 1.4 solar masses. Most likely, this pulsar belongs to the rare class of intermediate mass binary pulsars. Future timing observations will aim to determine the parameters of this system further, measure relativistic effects, and elucidate the nature of the companion star.
  • We use the charged tip of a low temperature scanning probe microscope to perturb the transport through a graphene nanoconstriction. Maps of the conductance as a function of tip position display concentric halos, and by following the expansion of the halos with back-gate voltage we are able to identify an elongated domain over the nanoconstriction where they originate. Amplitude modulations of the transmission resonances are correlated with the gradient of the tip-induced potential and we analyze this in terms of modified coupling between localized states.
  • Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.
  • Observation of the interplay between interacting energy levels of two spin species is limited by the difficulties in continuously tracking energy levels, and thus leaves spin transport in quantum wires still not well understood. We present a dc conductance feature in the non-equilibrium transport regime, a direct indication that the first one-dimensional subband is filled mostly by one spin species only. How this anomalous spin population changes with magnetic field and source-drain bias is directly measured. We show the source-drain bias changes spin polarisation in semiconductor nanowires, providing a fully electrical method for the creation and manipulation of spin polarization as well as spin-polarized currents.
  • Using standard microfabrication techniques it is now possible to construct devices, which appear to reliably manipulate electrons one at a time. These devices have potential use as building blocks in quantum computing devices, or as a standard of electrical current derived only from a frequency and the fundamental charge. To date the error rate in semiconductor 'tuneable-barrier' pump devices, those which show most promise for high frequency operation, have not been tested in detail. We present high accuracy measurements of the current from an etched GaAs quantum dot pump, operated at zero source-drain bias voltage with a single AC-modulated gate driving the pump cycle. By comparison with a reference current derived from primary standards, we show that the electron transfer accuracy is better than 15 parts per million. High-resolution studies of the dependence of the pump current on the quantum dot tuning parameters also reveal possible deviations from a model used to describe the pumping cycle.
  • State readout is a key requirement for a quantum computer. For semiconductor-based qubit devices it is usually accomplished using a separate mesoscopic electrometer. Here we demonstrate a simple detection scheme in which a radio-frequency resonant circuit coupled to a semiconductor double quantum dot is used to probe its charge and spin states. These results demonstrate a new non-invasive technique for measuring charge and spin states in quantum dot systems without requiring a separate mesoscopic detector.
  • We have used scanning gate microscopy to explore the local conductivity of a current-annealed graphene flake. A map of the local neutrality point (NP) after annealing at low current density exhibits micron-sized inhomogeneities. Broadening of the local e-h transition is also correlated with the inhomogeneity of the NP. Annealing at higher current density reduces the NP inhomogeneity, but we still observe some asymmetry in the e-h conduction. We attribute this to a hole doped domain close to one of the metal contacts combined with underlying striations in the local NP.
  • Two quantized charge pumps are operated in parallel. The total current generated is shown to be far more accurate than the current produced with just one pump operating at a higher frequency. With the application of a perpendicular magnetic field the accuracy of quantization is shown to be $< $20 ppm for a current of $108.9 $pA. The scheme for parallel pumping presented in this work has applications in quantum information processing, the generation of single photons in pairs and bunches, neural networking and the development of a quantum standard for electrical current. All these applications will benefit greatly from the increase in output current without the characteristic decrease in accuracy as a result of high-frequency operation.
  • We study electron transport in quasi-one-dimensional wires at relatively weak electrostatic confinements, where the Coulomb interaction distorts the ground state, leading to the bifurcation of the electronic system into two rows. Evidence of finite coupling between the rows, resulting in bonding and antibonding states, is observed. At high dc source-drain bias, a structure is observed at 0.5(2e^2/h) due to parallel double-row transport, along with a structure at 0.25(2e^2/h), providing further evidence of coupling between the two rows.
  • We have studied interactions between two capacitively coupled GaAs/AlGaAs few-electron double quantum dots. Each double quantum dot defines a tunable two-level system, or qubit, in which a single excess electron occupies either the ground state of one dot or the other. Applying microwave radiation we resonantly drive transitions between states and non-invasively measure occupancy changes using proximal quantum point contact charge detectors. The level structure of the interacting two-qubit system is probed by driving it at a fixed microwave frequency whilst varying the energy detuning of both double dots. We observe additional resonant transitions consistent with a simple coupled two-qubit Hamiltonian model.
  • We study the low-temperature transport properties of 1D quantum wires as the confinement strength V_conf and the carrier density n_1D are varied using a combination of split gates and a top gate in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. At intermediate V_conf and n_1D, we observe a jump in conductance to 4e^2/h, suggesting a double wire. On further reducing n_1D, plateau at 2e^2/h returns. Our results show beginnings of the formation of an electron lattice in an interacting quasi-1D quantum wire. In the presence of an in-plane magnetic field, mixing of spin-aligned levels of the two wires gives rise to more complex states.
  • We present experimental results of high frequency quantized charge pumping through a quantum dot formed by the electric field arising from applied voltages in a GaAs/AlGaAs system in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field B. Clear changes are observed in the quantized current plateaus as a function of applied magnetic field. We report on the robustness in the length of the quantized plateaus and improvements in the quantization as a result of the applied B field.
  • We report the discovery of a 7.3 Mjup exoplanet WASP-14b, one of the most massive transiting exoplanets observed to date. The planet orbits the tenth-magnitude F5V star USNO-B1 11118-0262485 with a period of 2.243752 days and orbital eccentricity e = 0.09. A simultaneous fit of the transit light curve and radial velocity measurements yields a planetary mass of 7.3+/-0.5 Mjup and a radius of 1.28+/-0.08 Rjup. This leads to a mean density of about 4.6 g/cm^3 making it densest transiting exoplanets yet found at an orbital period less than 3 days. We estimate this system to be at a distance of 160+/-20 pc. Spectral analysis of the host star reveals a temperature of 6475+/-100 K, log g = 4.07 cm/s^2 and vsin i = 4.9+/-1.0 km/s, and also a high lithium abundance, log N(Li} = 2.84+/-0.05. The stellar density, effective temperature and rotation rate suggest an age for the system of about 0.5-1.0 Gyr.
  • We report the discovery of a sub-Jupiter mass exoplanet transiting a magnitude V=11.7 host star 1SWASP J030928.54+304024.7. A simultaneous fit to the transit photometry and radial-velocity measurements yield a planet mass M_p=0.53+-0.07M_J, radius R_p=0.91^{+0.06}_{-0.03}R_J and an orbital period of 3.722465^{+0.000006}_{-0.000008} days. The host star is of spectral type K3V, with a spectral analysis yielding an effective temperature of 4800+-100K and log g=4.45+-0.2. It is amongst the smallest, least massive and lowest luminosity stars known to harbour a transiting exoplanet. WASP-11b is the third least strongly irradiated transiting exoplanet discovered to date, experiencing an incident flux F_p=1.9x10^8 erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} and having an equilibrium temperature T_eq=960+-70K.