• Context. The scattering polarization signal observed in the photospheric Sr i 4607 {\AA} line is expected to vary at granular spatial scales. This variation can be due to changes in the magnetic field intensity and orientation (Hanle effect), but also to spatial and temporal variations in the plasma properties. Measuring the spatial variation of such polarization signal would allow us to study the properties of the magnetic fields at subgranular scales, but observations are challenging since both high spatial resolution and high spectropolarimetric sensitivity are required. Aims. We aim to provide observational evidence of the polarization peak spatial variations, and to analyze the correlation they might have with granulation. Methods. Observations conjugating high spatial resolution and high spectropolarimetric precision were performed with the Zurich IMaging POLarimeter, ZIMPOL, at the GREGOR solar telescope, taking advantage of the adaptive optics system and the newly installed image derotator. Results. Spatial variations of the scattering polarization in the Sr i 4607 {\AA} line are clearly observed. The spatial scale of these variations is comparable with the granular size. Small correlations between the polarization signal amplitude and the continuum intensity indicate that the polarization is higher at the center of granules than in the intergranular lanes.
  • We present observations of the known edge-on debris disk around HIP 79977 (HD 146897, F star in Upper Sco, 123 pc), taken with the ZIMPOL differential polarimeter of the SPHERE instrument in the Very Broad Band filter ($\lambda_c=735$ nm, $\Delta\lambda=290$ nm) with a spatial resolution of about 25 mas. We measure the polarization flux along and perpendicular to the disk spine of the highly inclined disk for projected separations between 0.2" (25 AU) and 1.6" (200 AU) and investigate the diagnostic potential of such data with model simulations. The polarized flux contrast ratio for the disk is $F_{pol}/F_\ast= (5.5 \pm 0.9) 10^{-4}$. The surface brightness reaches a maximum of 16.2 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ at a separation of $0.2"-0.5"$ along the disk spine with a maximum surface brightness contrast of 7.64 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. The polarized flux has a minimum near the star $<0.2"$ because no or only little polarization is produced by forward or backward scattering in the disk section lying in front of or behind the star. The data are modeled as a circular dust belt with an inclination $i=85(\pm 1.5)^\circ$ and a radius between $r_0$ = 60 AU and 90 AU. The radial density dependence is described by $(r/r_0)^{\alpha}$ with a steep power law index $\alpha=5$ inside $r_0$ and a more shallow index $\alpha=-2.5$ outside $r_0$. The scattering asymmetry factor lies between $g$ = 0.2 and 0.6 adopting a scattering angle-dependence for the fractional polarization as for Rayleigh scattering. Our data are qualitatively very similar to the case of AU Mic and they confirm that edge-on debris disks have a polarization minimum at a position near the star and a maximum near the projected separation of the main debris belt. The comparison of the polarized flux contrast ratio $F_{pol}/F_{\ast}$ with the fractional infrared excess provides strong constraints on the scattering albedo of the dust.
  • July 5, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    The SHINE program is a large high-contrast near-infrared survey of 600 young, nearby stars. It is aimed at searching for and characterizing new planetary systems using VLT/SPHERE's unprecedented high-contrast and high-angular resolution imaging capabilities. It also intends at placing statistical constraints on the occurrence and orbital properties of the giant planet population at large orbits as a function of the stellar host mass and age to test planet formation theories. We use the IRDIS dual-band imager and the IFS integral field spectrograph of SPHERE to acquire high-constrast coronagraphic differential near-infrared images and spectra of the young A2 star HIP65426. It is a member of the ~17 Myr old Lower Centaurus-Crux association. At a separation of 830 mas (92 au projected) from the star, we detect a faint red companion. Multi-epoch observations confirm that it shares common proper motion with HIP65426. Spectro-photometric measurements extracted with IFS and IRDIS between 0.95 and 2.2um indicate a warm, dusty atmosphere characteristic of young low surface-gravity L5-L7 dwarfs. Hot-start evolutionary models predict a luminosity consistent with a 6-12 MJup, Teff=1300-1600 K and R=1.5 RJup giant planet. Finally, the comparison with Exo-REM and PHOENIX BT-Settl synthetic atmosphere models gives consistent effective temperatures but with slightly higher surface gravity solutions of log(g)=4.0-5.0 with smaller radii (1.0-1.3 RJup). Given its physical and spectral properties, HIP65426b occupies a rather unique placement in terms of age, mass and spectral-type among the currently known imaged planets. It represents a particularly interesting case to study the presence of clouds as a function of particle size, composition, and location in the atmosphere, to search for signatures of non-equilibrium chemistry, and finally to test the theory of planet formation and evolution.
  • We have observed the protoplanetary disk of the well-known young Herbig star HD 142527 using ZIMPOL Polarimetric Differential Imaging with the VBB (Very Broad Band, ~600-900nm) filter. We obtained two datasets in May 2015 and March 2016. Our data allow us to explore dust scattering around the star down to a radius of ~0.025" (~4au). The well-known outer disk is clearly detected, at higher resolution than before, and shows previously unknown sub-structures, including spirals going inwards into the cavity. Close to the star, dust scattering is detected at high signal-to-noise ratio, but it is unclear whether the signal represents the inner disk, which has been linked to the two prominent local minima in the scattering of the outer disk, interpreted as shadows. An interpretation of an inclined inner disk combined with a dust halo is compatible with both our and previous observations, but other arrangements of the dust cannot be ruled out. Dust scattering is also present within the large gap between ~30 and ~140au. The comparison of the two datasets suggests rapid evolution of the inner regions of the disk, potentially driven by the interaction with the close-in M-dwarf companion, around which no polarimetric signal is detected.
  • R Aqr is a symbiotic binary system consisting of a mira variable, a hot companion with a spectacular jet outflow, and an extended emission line nebula. We have used R Aqr as test target for the visual camera subsystem ZIMPOL, which is part of the new extreme adaptive optics (AO) instrument SPHERE at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We compare our observations with data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and illustrate the complementarity of the two instruments. We determine from the Halpha emission the position, size, geometric structure, and line fluxes of the jet source and the clouds in the innermost region (<2") of R Aqr and determine Halpha emissivities mean density, mass, recombination time scale, and other cloud parameters. Our data resolve for the first time the R Aqr binary and we measure for the jet source a relative position 46+/-1 mas West of the mira. The central jet source is the strongest Halpha component. North east and south west from the central source there are many clouds with very diverse structures. We see in the SW a string of bright clouds arranged in a zig-zag pattern and, further out, more extended bubbles. In the N and NE we see a bright, very elongated filamentary structure and faint perpendicular "wisps" further out. Some jet clouds are also detected in the ZIMPOL [OI] and He I filters, as well as in the HST line filters for Halpha, [OIII], [NII], and [OI]. We determine jet cloud parameters and find a very well defined anti-correlation between cloud density and distance to the central binary. Future Halpha observations will provide the orientation of the orbital plane of the binary and allow detailed hydrodynamical investigations of this jet outflow and its interaction with the wind of the red giant companion.
  • The protoplanetary disk around the F-type star HD 135344B (SAO 206462) is in a transition stage and shows many intriguing structures both in scattered light and thermal (sub-)millimeter emission which are possibly related to planet formation processes. We study the morphology and surface brightness of the disk in scattered light to gain insight into the innermost disk regions, the formation of protoplanets, planet-disk interactions traced in the surface and midplane layers, and the dust grain properties of the disk surface. We have carried out high-contrast polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) observations with VLT/SPHERE and obtained polarized scattered light images with ZIMPOL in R- and I-band and with IRDIS in Y- and J-band. The scattered light images reveal with unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity the spiral arms as well as the 25 au cavity of the disk. Multiple shadow features are discovered on the outer disk with one shadow only being present during the second observation epoch. A positive surface brightness gradient is observed in the stellar irradiation corrected images in southwest direction possibly due to an azimuthally asymmetric perturbation of the temperature and/or surface density by the passing spiral arms. The disk integrated polarized flux, normalized to the stellar flux, shows a positive trend towards longer wavelengths which we attribute to large aggregate dust grains in the disk surface. Part of the the non-azimuthal polarization signal in the Uphi image of the J-band observation could be the result of multiple scattering in the disk. The detected shadow features and their possible variability have the potential to provide insight into the structure of and processes occurring in the innermost disk regions.
  • Understanding the diversity of planets requires to study the morphology and the physical conditions in the protoplanetary disks in which they form. We observed and spatially resolved the disk around the ~10 Myr old protoplanetary disk HD 100453 in polarized scattered light with SPHERE/VLT at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, reaching an angular resolution of ~0.02", and an inner working angle of ~0.09". We detect polarized scattered light up to ~0.42" (~48 au) and detect a cavity, a rim with azimuthal brightness variations at an inclination of 38 degrees, two shadows and two symmetric spiral arms. The spiral arms originate near the location of the shadows, close to the semi major axis. We detect a faint spiral-like feature in the SW that can be interpreted as the scattering surface of the bottom side of the disk, if the disk is tidally truncated by the M-dwarf companion currently seen at a projected distance of ~119 au. We construct a radiative transfer model that accounts for the main characteristics of the features with an inner and outer disk misaligned by ~72 degrees. The azimuthal brightness variations along the rim are well reproduced with the scattering phase function of the model. While spirals can be triggered by the tidal interaction with the companion, the close proximity of the spirals to the shadows suggests that the shadows could also play a role. The change in stellar illumination along the rim, induces an azimuthal variation of the scale height that can contribute to the brightness variations. Dark regions in polarized images of transition disks are now detected in a handful of disks and often interpreted as shadows due to a misaligned inner disk. The origin of such a misalignment in HD 100453, and of the spirals, is unclear, and might be due to a yet-undetected massive companion inside the cavity, and on an inclined orbit.
  • [Abridged] Context. The young systems PZ Tel and HD 1160, hosting known low-mass companions, were observed during the commissioning of the new planet finder SPHERE with several imaging and spectroscopic modes. Aims. We aim to refine the physical properties and architecture of both systems. Methods. We use SPHERE commissioning data and REM observations, as well as literature and unpublished data from VLT/SINFONI, VLT/NaCo, Gemini/NICI, and Keck/NIRC2. Results. We derive new photometry and confirm the nearly daily photometric variability of PZ Tel A. Using literature data spanning 38 yr, we show that the star also exhibits a long-term variability trend. The 0.63-3.8 mic SED of PZ Tel B allows us to revise its properties: spectral type M7+/-1, Teff=2700+/-100 K, log(g)<4.5 dex, log(L/L_Sun)=-2.51+/-0.10 dex, and mass 38-72 MJ. The 1-3.8 mic SED of HD 1160 B suggests a massive brown dwarf or a low-mass star with spectral type M5.5-7.0, Teff=3000+/-100 K, [M/H]=-0.5-0.0 dex, log(L/L_Sun)=-2.81+/-0.10 dex, and mass 39-168 MJ. We confirm the deceleration and high eccentricity (e>0.66) of PZ Tel B. For e<0.9, the inclination, longitude of the ascending node, and time of periastron passage are well constrained. The system is seen close to an edge-on geometry. We reject other brown dwarf candidates outside 0.25" for both systems, and massive giant planets (>4 MJ) outside 0.5" for the PZ Tel system. We also show that K1-K2 color can be used with YJH low-resolution spectra to identify young L-type companions, provided high photometric accuracy (<0.05 mag) is achieved. Conclusions. SPHERE opens new horizons in the study of young brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets thanks to high-contrast imaging capabilities at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, as well as high signal-to-noise spectroscopy in the near-infrared from low (R~30-50) to medium resolutions (R~350).
  • We present ground-based limb polarization measurements of Jupiter and Saturn consisting of full disk imaging polarimetry for the wavelength 7300 A and spatially resolved (long slit) spectropolarimetry covering the wavelength range 5200 to 9350 A. For the polar region of Jupiter we find for wl=6000 A a very strong radial polarization with a seeing corrected maximum of about +11.5% in the South and +10.0% in the North. Our model calculations demonstrate that the high limb polarization can be explained by strongly polarizing (p~1.0), high albedo (omega~0.98) haze particles with a scattering asymmetry parameter of g~0.6 as expected for aggregate particles. The deduced particle parameters are distinctively different when compared to lower latitude regions. The spectropolarimetry of Jupiter shows a decrease in the polar limb polarization towards longer wavelengths and a significantly enhanced polarization in strong methane bands when compared to the adjacent continuum. For lower latitudes the fractional polarization is small, negative, and it depends only little on wavelength except for the strong CH4-band at 8870 A. The South pole of Saturn shows a lower polarization (p~1.0-1.5%) than the poles of Jupiter. The spectropolarimetric signal for Saturn decrease rapidly with wavelength and shows no significant enhancements in the fractional polarization in the absorption bands. These properties can be explained by a vertically extended stratospheric haze region composed of small particles <100nm. In addition we find a previously not observed strong polarization feature (p=1.5-2.0%) near the equator of Saturn. The origin of this polarization signal is unclear but it could be related to a seasonal effect.
  • The history of the IRSOL observatory is closely related to Second Solar Spectrum observations. Already in 1963 Brueckner observed scattering polarization in the CaI 4227A line. In 1996 the Hanle effect in the quiet chromosphere was measured for the first time in Locarno using the same spectral line. Since 1998 the ZIMPOL system, a polarimeter allowing unprecedented polarimetric precision, has been installed at IRSOL and been constantly upgraded to state-of-the-art technologies thanks to the close collaboration with the Institute of Astronomy in Zurich. It allows to measure the faint signatures of various scattering polarization effects. A brief historical summary of observations related to polarization at IRSOL is given.
  • We report the first spectropolarimetric observations and modeling of CaH transitions in sunspots. We have detected strong polarization signals in many CaH lines from the A-X system, and we provide the first successful fit to the observed Stokes profiles using the previously developed theory of the Paschen-Back effect in arbitrary electronic states of diatomic molecules and polarized radiative transfer in molecular lines in stellar atmospheres. We analyze the CaH Stokes profiles together with quasi-simultaneous observations in TiO bands and conclude that CaH provides a valuable diagnostic of magnetic fields in sunspots, starspots, cool stars, and brown dwarfs.