• The intriguing role of nematicity in iron-based superconductors, defined as broken rotational symmetry below a characteristic temperature, is an intensely investigated contemporary subject. Nematicity is closely connected to the structural transition, however, it is highly doubtful that the lattice degree of freedom is responsible for its formation, given the accumulating evidence for the observed large anisotropy. Here we combine molecular beam epitaxy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy together to study the nematicity in multilayer FeSe films on SrTiO3. Our results demonstrate direct connection between electronic anisotropy in momentum space and standing waves in real space at atomic scale. The lifting of orbital degeneracy of dxz/dyz bands gives rise to a pair of Dirac cone structures near the zone corner, which causes energy-independent unidirectional interference fringes, observed in real space as standing waves by scattering electrons off C2 domain walls and Se-defects. On the other hand, the formation of C2 nematic domain walls unexpectedly shows no correlation with lattice strain pattern, which is induced by the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate. Our results establish a clean case that the nematicity is driven by electronic rather than lattice degrees of freedom in FeSe films.
  • We have investigated the superconducting gap of optimally doped Ba(Fe$_{0.65}$Ru$_{0.35}$)$_2$As$_2$ by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (APRES) using bulk-sensitive 7 eV laser and synchrotron radiation. It was found that the gap is isotropic in the $k_x$-$k_y$ plane both on the electron and hole Fermi surfaces (FSs). The gap magnitudes of two resolved hole FSs show similar $k_z$ dependences and decrease as $k_z$ approaches $\sim$ 2$\pi$/$c$ (i.e., around the Z point) unlike the other Fe-based superconductors reported so far, where the superconducting gap of only one hole FS shows a strong $k_z$ dependence. This unique gap structure can be understood in the scenario that the $d_{z^2}$ orbital character is mixed into both hole FSs due to the finite spin-orbit coupling between almost degenerate FSs and is reproduced by calculations within the random phase approximation including the spin-orbit coupling.
  • An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several non-magnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Here, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.
  • We report a combined study of the spin resonances and superconducting gaps for underdoped ($T_c=19$ K), optimally doped ($T_c=25$ K), and overdoped ($T_c=19$ K) Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$)$_2$As$_2$ single crystals with inelastic neutron scattering and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find a quasi two dimensional spin resonance whose energy scales with the superconducting gap in all three compounds. In addition, anisotropic low energy spin excitation enhancements in the superconducting state have been deduced and characterized for the under and optimally doped compounds. Our data suggest that the quasi two dimensional spin resonance is a spin exciton that corresponds to the spin singlet-triplet excitations of the itinerant electrons. However, the intensity enhancements of the anisotropic spin excitations are dominated by the out-of-plane spin excitations of the ordered moments due to the suppression of damping in the superconducting state. Hence we offer a new interpretation of the double energy scales differing from previous interpretations based on anisotropic superconducting energy gaps, and systematically explain the doping-dependent trend across the phase diagram.
  • Fermi surface topology and pairing symmetry are two pivotal characteristics of a superconductor. Superconductivity in one monolayer (1ML) FeSe thin film has attracted great interest recently due to its intriguing interfacial properties and possibly high superconducting transition temperature (Tc) over 77 K. Here, we report high-resolution measurements of the Fermi surface and superconducting gaps in 1ML FeSe using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Two ellipse-like electron pockets are clearly resolved overlapping with each other at the Brillouin zone corner. The superconducting gap is nodeless but moderately anisotropic, which put strong constraints on determining the pairing symmetry. The gap maxima locate along the major axis of ellipse, which cannot be explained by a single d-wave, extended s-wave, or s$\pm$ gap function. Four gap minima are observed at the intersection of electron pockets suggesting the existence of either a sign change or orbital-dependent pairing in 1ML FeSe.
  • We present a systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the substitution-dependence of the electronic structure of Rb$_{0.8}$Fe$_{2}$(Se$_{1-z}$S$_z$)$_2$ (z = 0, 0.5, 1), where superconductivity is continuously suppressed into a metallic phase. Going from the non-superconducting Rb$_{0.8}$Fe$_{2}$(Se$_{1-z}$S$_z$)$_2$ to superconducting Rb$_{0.8}$Fe$_{2}$Se$_2$, we observe little change of the Fermi surface topology, but a reduction of the overall bandwidth by a factor of 2 as well as an increase of the orbital-dependent renormalization in the $d_{xy}$ orbital. Hence for these heavily electron-doped iron chalcogenides, we have identified electron correlation as explicitly manifested in the quasiparticle bandwidth to be the important tuning parameter for superconductivity, and that moderate correlation is essential to achieving high $T_C$.
  • Superconductivity originates from pairing of electrons. Pairing channel on Fermi surface and pairing glue are thus two pivotal issues for understanding a superconductor. Recently, high-temperature superconductivity over 40 K was found in electron-doped FeSe superconductors including K$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$, Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$OHFeSe, and 1 monolayer FeSe thin film. However, their pairing mechanism remains controversial. Here, we studied the systematic evolution of electronic structure in potassium-coated FeSe single crystal. The doping level is controlled precisely by in situ evaporating potassium onto the sample surface. We found that the superconductivity emerges when the inter-pocket scattering between two electron pockets is turned on by a Lifshitz transition of Fermi surface. The nematic order suppresses remarkably at the same doping and strong nematic fluctuation remains in a wide doping range of the phase diagram. Our results suggest an underlying correlation among superconductivity, inter-pocket scattering, and nematic fluctuation in electron-doped FeSe superconductors.
  • Single unit cell films of iron selenide (1UC FeSe) grown on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates have recently shown superconducting energy gaps opening at temperatures close to the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K), a record for iron-based superconductors. Towards understanding why Cooper pairs form at such high temperatures, a primary question to address is the role, if any, of the STO substrate. Here, we report high resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results which reveal an unexpected and unique characteristic of the 1UC FeSe/STO system: shake-off bands suggesting the presence of bosonic modes, most likely oxygen optical phonons in STO, which couple to the FeSe electrons with only small momentum transfer. Such coupling has the unusual benefit of helping superconductivity in most channels, including those mediated by spin fluctuations. Our calculations suggest such coupling is responsible for raising the superconducting gap opening temperature in 1UC FeSe/STO. This discovery suggests a pathway to engineer high temperature superconductors.
  • Negative compressibility is a sign of thermodynamic instability of open or non-equilibrium systems. In quantum materials consisting of multiple mutually coupled subsystems, the compressibility of one subsystem can be negative if it is countered by positive compressibility of the others. Manifestations of this effect have so far been limited to low-dimensional dilute electron systems. Here we present evidence from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) for negative electronic compressibility (NEC) in the quasi-three-dimensional (3D) spin-orbit correlated metal (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7. Increased electron filling accompanies an anomalous decrease of the chemical potential, as indicated by the overall movement of the deep valence bands. Such anomaly, suggestive of NEC, is shown to be primarily driven by the lowering in energy of the conduction band as the correlated bandgap reduces. Our finding points to a distinct pathway towards an uncharted territory of NEC featuring bulk correlated metals with unique potential for applications in low-power nanoelectronics and novel metamaterials.
  • We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected "Fermi arcs", reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr2IrO4. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.
  • Nematic state, where the system is translationally invariant but breaks the rotational symmetry, has drawn great attentions recently due to experimental observations of such a state in both cuprates and iron-based superconductors. The mechanism of nematicity that is likely tied to the pairing mechanism of high-Tc, however, still remains controversial. Here, we studied the electronic structure of multilayer FeSe film by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We found that the FeSe film enters the nematic state around 125 K, while the electronic signature of long range magnetic order has not been observed down to 20K indicating the non-magnetic origin of the nematicity. The band reconstruction in the nematic state is characterized by the splitting of the dxz and dyz bands. More intriguingly, such energy splitting is strong momentum dependent with the largest band splitting of ~80meV at the zone corner. The simple on-site ferro-orbital ordering is insufficient to reproduce the nontrivial momentum dependence of the band reconstruction. Instead, our results suggest that the nearest-neighbor hopping of dxz and dyz is highly anisotropic in the nematic state, the origin of which holds the key in understanding the nematicity in iron-based superconductors.
  • The isovalent-substituted iron-pnictide superconductor SrFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$ ($x$=0.35) has a slightly higher optimum critical temperature than the similar system BaFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$, and its parent compound SrFe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ has a much higher N\'eel temperature than BaFe$_{2}$As$_{2}$. We have studied the band structure and the Fermi surfaces of optimally-doped SrFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$ by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Three holelike Fermi surfaces (FSs) around (0,0) and two electronlike FSs around ($\pi$,$\pi$) have been observed as in the case of BaFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$. Measurements with different photon energies have revealed that one of the hole FSs is more strongly warped along the $k_{z}$ direction than the corresponding one in BaFe(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$, while the electron FSs are almost cylindrical unlike corrugated ones in BaFe(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$. Comparison of the ARPES data with first-principles band-structure calculation revealed that the quasiparticle mass renormalization factors are different not only between bands of different orbital character but also between the hole and electron FSs of the same orbital character. By examining nesting conditions between the hole and electron FSs, we conclude that magnetic interactions between FeAs layers rather than FS nesting play an important role in stabilizing the antiferromagnetic order. The insensitivity of superconductivity to the FS nesting can be explained if only the $d_{xy}$ and/or $d_{xz/yz}$ orbitals are active in inducing superconductivity or if FS nesting is not important for superconductivity.
  • An intriguing aspect of unconventional superconductivity is that it always appears in the vicinity of other competing phases, whose suppression brings the full emergence of superconductivity. In the iron-pnictides, these competing phases are marked by a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural transition and a collinear spin-density-wave (SDW) transition. There has been macroscopic evidence for competition between these phases and superconductivity as the magnitude of both the orthorhombicity and magnetic moment are suppressed in the superconducting state. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on detwinned underdoped $Ba_{1-x}K_xFe_2As_2$, we observe a coexistence of both the SDW gap and superconducting gap in the same electronic structure. Furthermore, our data reveal that following the onset of superconductivity, the SDW gap decreases in magnitude and shifts in a direction consistent with a reduction of the orbital anisotropy. This observation provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the dynamic competition between superconductivity and both SDW and electronic nematic orders in these materials.
  • The electronic structure of BaTi2As2O, a parent compound of the newly discovered titanium-based oxypnictide superconductors, is studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic structure shows multi-orbital nature and possible three-dimensional character. An anomalous temperature-dependent spectral weight redistribution and broad lineshape indicate the incoherent nature of the spectral function. At the density-wave-like transition temperature around 200 K, a partial gap opens at the Fermi patches. These findings suggest that BaTi2As2O is likely a charge density wave material in the strong interaction regime.
  • We have studied the electronic structure of Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Mn$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ ($x$=0.08), which fails to become a superconductor in spite of the formal hole doping like Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$, by photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). With decreasing temperature, a transition from the paramagnetic phase to the antiferromagnetic phase was clearly observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. XAS results indicated that the substituted Mn atoms form a strongly hybridized ground state. Resonance-photoemission spectra at the Mn $L_{3}$ edge revealed that the Mn 3d partial density of states is distributed over a wide energy range of 2-13 eV below the Fermi level ($E_F$), with little contribution around $E_F$. This indicates that the dopant Mn 3$d$ states are localized in spite of the strong Mn 3d-As $4p$ hybridization and split into the occupied and unoccupied parts due to the on-site Coulomb and exchange interaction. The absence of superconductivity in Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Mn$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ can thus be ascribed both to the absence of carrier doping in the FeAs plane, and to the strong stabilizaiton of the antiferromagnetic order by the Mn impurities.
  • We investigate the order parameter dynamics of the stripe-ordered nickelate, La$_{1.75}$Sr$_{0.25}$NiO$_4$, using time-resolved resonant X-ray diffraction. In spite of distinct spin and charge energy scales, the two order parameters' amplitude dynamics are found to be linked together due to strong coupling. Additionally, the vector nature of the spin sector introduces a longer re-orientation time scale which is absent in the charge sector. These findings demonstrate that the correlation linking the symmetry-broken states does not unbind during the non-equilibrium process, and the time scales are not necessarily associated with the characteristic energy scales of individual degrees of freedom.
  • A detailed phenomenology of low energy excitations is a crucial starting point for microscopic understanding of complex materials such as the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Because of its unique momentum-space discrimination, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is ideally suited for this task in the cuprates where emergent phases, particularly superconductivity and the pseudogap, have anisotropic gap structure in momentum space. We present a comprehensive doping-and-temperature dependence ARPES study of spectral gaps in Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ (Bi-2212), covering much of the superconducting portion of the phase diagram. In the ground state, abrupt changes in near-nodal gap phenomenology give spectroscopic evidence for two potential quantum critical points, p$=$0.19 for the pseudogap phase and p$=$0.076 for another competing phase. Temperature dependence reveals that the pseudogap is not static below T$_c$ and exists p$>$0.19 at higher temperatures. Our data imply a revised phase diagram which reconciles conflicting reports about the endpoint of the pseudogap in the literature, incorporates phase competition between the superconducting gap and pseudogap, and highlights distinct physics at the edge of the superconducting dome.
  • The interplay between superconductivity and the pseudogap is an important aspect of cuprate physics. However, the nature of the pseudogap remains controversial, in part because different experiments have suggested different gap functions. Here we present a photon-energy-dependence angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study on Bi$_{1.5}$Pb$_{0.55}$Sr$_{1.6}$La$_{0.4}$CuO$_{6+\delta}$. We find that antinodal ARPES spectra at low photon energies are dominated by background signals which can lead to a misevaluation of the spectral gap size. Once background is properly accounted for, independent of photon energy, the antinodal spectra robustly show two coexisting features at different energies dominantly attributed to the pseudogap and superconductivity, as well as an overall spectral gap which deviates from a simple d-wave form. These results support the idea that the spectral gap is distorted due to the competition between the pseudogap and superconductivity.
  • Relationship between the superconducting gap and the pseudogap has been the subject of controversies. In order to clarify this issue, we have studied the superconducting gap and pseudogap of the high-Tc superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 (x=0.10, 0.14) by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Through the analysis of the ARPES spectra above and below Tc, we have identified a superconducting coherence peak even in the anti-nodal region on top of the pseudogap of a larger energy scale. The superconducting peak energy nearly follows the pure d-wave form. The d-wave order parameter \Delta_0 [defined by \Delta(k)=\Delta_0(cos(kxa)-cos(kya)) ] for x=0.10 and 0.14 are nearly the same, \Delta_0 ~ 12-14 meV, leading to strong coupling 2\Delta_0/kB Tc ~ 10. The present result indicates that the pseudogap and the superconducting gap are distinct phenomena and can be described by the "two-gap" scenario.
  • The dynamics of an order parameter's amplitude and phase determines the collective behaviour of novel states emerged in complex materials. Time- and momentum-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, by virtue of its ability to measure material properties at atomic and electronic time scales and create excited states not accessible by the conventional means can decouple entangled degrees of freedom by visualizing their corresponding dynamics in the time domain. Here, combining time-resolved femotosecond optical and resonant x-ray diffraction measurements on striped La1.75Sr0.25NiO4, we reveal unforeseen photo-induced phase fluctuations of the charge order parameter. Such fluctuations preserve long-range order without creating topological defects, unlike thermal phase fluctuations near the critical temperature in equilibrium10. Importantly, relaxation of the phase fluctuations are found to be an order of magnitude slower than that of the order parameter's amplitude fluctuations, and thus limit charge order recovery. This discovery of new aspect to phase fluctuation provides more holistic view for the importance of phase in ordering phenomena of quantum matter.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study twinned and detwinned iron pnictide compound NaFeAs. Distinct signatures of electronic reconstruction are observed to occur at the structural (TS) and magnetic (TSDW) transitions. At TS, C4 rotational symmetry is broken in the form of an anisotropic shift of the orthogonal dxz and dyz bands. The magnitude of this orbital anisotropy rapidly develops to near completion upon approaching TSDW, at which temperature band folding occurs via the antiferromagnetic ordering wave vector. Interestingly, the anisotropic band shift onsetting at TS develops in such a way to enhance the nesting conditions in the C2 symmetric state, hence is intimately correlated with the long range collinear AFM order. Furthermore, the similar behaviors of the electronic reconstruction in NaFeAs and Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 suggests that this rapid development of large orbital anisotropy between TS and TSDW is likely a general feature of the electronic nematic phase in the iron pnictides, and the associated orbital fluctuations may play an important role in determining the ground state properties.
  • $J/\Psi$-nuclear bound state energies are calculated for a range of nuclei by solving the Proca (Klein-Gordon) equation. Critical input for the calculations, namely the medium-modified $D$ and $D^*$ meson masses, as well as the nucleon density distributions in nuclei, are obtained from the quark-meson coupling model. The attractive potential originates from the $D$ and $D^*$ meson loops in the $J/\Psi$ self-energy in nuclear medium. It appears that $J/\Psi$-nuclear bound states should produce a clear experimental signature provided that the $J/\Psi$ meson is produced in recoilless kinematics.
  • Knowledge of the gap function is important to understand the pairing mechanism for high-temperature ($T_\mathrm{c}$) superconductivity. However, Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy (FT STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the cuprates have reported contradictory gap functions, with FT-STS results deviating strongly from a canonical $d_{x^2-y^2}$ form. By applying an "octet model" analysis to autocorrelation ARPES, we reveal that a contradiction occurs because the octet model does not consider the effects of matrix elements and the pseudogap. This reaffirms the canonical $d_{x^2-y^2}$ superconducting gap around the node, which can be directly determined from ARPES. Further, our study suggests that the FT-STS reported fluctuating superconductivity around the node at far above $T_\mathrm{c}$ is not necessary to explain the existence of the quasiparticle interference
  • Nematicity, defined as broken rotational symmetry, has recently been observed in competing phases proximate to the superconducting phase in the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Similarly, the new iron-based high temperature superconductors exhibit a tetragonal to orthorhombic structural transition (i.e. a broken C4 symmetry) that either precedes or is coincident with a collinear spin density wave (SDW) transition in undoped parent compounds, and superconductivity arises when both transitions are suppressed via doping. Evidence for strong in-plane anisotropy in the SDW state in this family of compounds has been reported by neutron scattering, scanning tunneling microscopy, and transport measurements. Here we present an angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of detwinned single crystals of a representative family of electron-doped iron-arsenide superconductors, Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 in the underdoped region. The crystals were detwinned via application of in-plane uniaxial stress, enabling measurements of single domain electronic structure in the orthorhombic state. At low temperatures, our results clearly demonstrate an in-plane electronic anisotropy characterized by a large energy splitting of two orthogonal bands with dominant dxz and dyz character, which is consistent with anisotropy observed by other probes. For compositions x>0, for which the structural transition (TS) precedes the magnetic transition (TSDW), an anisotropic splitting is observed to develop above TSDW, indicating that it is specifically associated with TS. For unstressed crystals, the band splitting is observed close to TS, whereas for stressed crystals the splitting is observed to considerably higher temperatures, revealing the presence of a surprisingly large in-plane nematic susceptibility in the electronic structure.
  • The nature of the pseudogap phase of cuprate high-temperature superconductors is a major unsolved problem in condensed matter physics. We studied the commencement of the pseudogap state at temperature T* using three different techniques (angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, polar Kerr effect, and time-resolved reflectivity) on the same optimally-doped Bi2201 crystals. We observed the coincident, abrupt onset at T* of a particle-hole asymmetric antinodal gap in the electronic spectrum, a Kerr rotation in the reflected light polarization, and a change in the ultrafast relaxational dynamics, consistent with a phase transition. Upon further cooling, spectroscopic signatures of superconductivity begin to grow close to the superconducting transition temperature (Tc), entangled in an energy-momentum-dependent fashion with the pre-existing pseudogap features, ushering in a ground state with coexisting orders.