• We analyze the 11.2 {\mu}m unidentified infrared band (UIR) spectrum from NGC 7027 and identify a small fullerene (C24) as a plausible carrier. The blurring effects of lifetime and vibrational anharmonicity broadening obscure the narrower, intrinsic spectral profiles of the UIR band carriers. We use a spectral deconvolution algorithm to remove the blurring, in order to retrieve the intrinsic profile of the UIR band. The shape of the intrinsic profile, a sharp blue peak and an extended red tail, suggests that the UIR band originates from a molecular vibration-rotation band with a blue band head. The fractional area of the band-head feature indicates a spheroidal molecule, implying a non-polar molecule and precluding rotational emission. Its rotational temperature should be well approximated by that measured for non-polar molecular hydrogen, ~825 K for NGC 7027. Using this temperature, and the inferred spherical symmetry, we perform a spectral fit to the intrinsic profile that results in a rotational constant implying C24 as the carrier. We show that the spectroscopic parameters derived for NGC 7027 are consistent with the 11.2 {\mu}m UIR bands observed for other objects. We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the frequencies and infrared intensities of C24. The DFT results are used to predict a spectral energy distribution (SED) originating from absorption of a 5 eV photon, and characterized by an effective vibrational temperature of 930 K. The C24 SED is consistent with the entire UIR spectrum and is the dominant contributor to the 11.2 and 12.7 {\mu}m bands.
  • HD 50138 is a B[e] star surrounded by a large amount of circumstellar gas and dust. Its spectrum shows characteristics which may indicate either a pre- or a post-main-sequence system. Mapping the kinematics of the gas in the inner few au of the system contributes to a better understanding of its physical nature. We present the first high spatial and spectral resolution interferometric observations of the Br-gamma line of HD~50138, obtained with VLTI/AMBER. The line emission originates from a region more compact (up to 3 au) than the continuum-emitting region. Blue- and red-shifted emission originates from the two different hemispheres of an elongated structure perpendicular to the polarization angle. The velocity of the emitting medium decreases radially. An overall offset along the NW direction between the line- and continuum-emitting regions is observed. We compare the data with a geometric model of a thin Keplerian disk and a spherical halo on top of a Gaussian continuum. Most of the data are well reproduced by this model, except for the variability, the global offset and the visibility at the systemic velocity. The evolutionary state of the system is discussed; most diagnostics are ambiguous and may point either to a post-main-sequence or a pre-main-sequence nature.
  • The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis gained notoriety in 2002 when it brightened nine magnitudes in a series of three outbursts and then rapidly evolved into an extremely cool supergiant. We present optical, near-IR, and mid-IR spectroscopic and photometric observations of V838 Monocerotis obtained between 2008 and 2012 at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m, NASA IRTF 3m, and Gemini South 8m telescopes. We contemporaneously analyze the optical & IR spectroscopic properties of V838 Monocerotis to arrive at a revised spectral type L3 supergiant and effective temperature Teff~2000--2200 K. Because there are no existing optical observational data for L supergiants in the optical, we speculate that V838 Monocerotis may represent the prototype for L supergiants in this wavelength regime. We find a low level of Halpha emission present in the system, consistent with interaction between V838 Monocerotis and its B3V binary; however, we cannot rule out a stellar collision as the genesis event, which could result in the observed Halpha activity. Based upon a two-component blackbody fit to all wavelengths of our data, we conclude that, as of 2009, a shell of ejecta surrounded V838 Monocerotis at a radius of R=263+/-10 AU with a temperature of T=285+/-2 K. This result is consistent with IR interferometric observations from the same era and predictions from the Lynch et al. model of the expanding system, which provides a simple framework for understanding this complicated system.
  • Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate-mass pre-main sequence stars surrounded by circumstellar dust disks. Some are observed to produce jets, whose appearance as a sequence of shock fronts (knots) suggests a past episodic outflow variability. This "jet fossil record" can be used to reconstruct the outflow history. We present the first optical to near-infrared (NIR) VLT/X-shooter spectra of the jet from the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. We determine physical conditions in the knots, as well as their kinematic "launch epochs". Knots are formed simultaneously on either side of the disk, with a regular interval of ~16 yr. The velocity dispersion versus jet velocity and the energy input are comparable in both lobes. However, the mass loss rate, velocity, and shock conditions are asymmetric. We find Mjet/Macc ~ 0.01-0.1, consistent with magneto-centrifugal jet launching models. No evidence for dust is found in the high-velocity jet, suggesting it is launched within the sublimation radius (<0.5 au). The jet inclination measured from proper motions and radial velocities confirms it is perpendicular to the disk. A tentative relation is found between the structure of the jet and the photometric variability of the source. Episodes of NIR brightening were previously detected and attributed to a dusty disk wind. We report for the first time significant optical fadings lasting from a few days up to a year, coinciding with the NIR brightenings. These are likely caused by dust lifted high above the disk plane; this supports the disk wind scenario. The disk wind is launched at a larger radius than the high-velocity atomic jet, although their outflow variability may have a common origin. No significant relation between outflow and accretion variability could be established. Our findings confirm that this source undergoes periodic ejection events, which may be coupled with dust ejections above the disk plane.
  • One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases that the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. We present polarimetric differential imaging in $H$ band obtained with Subaru/HiCIAO of one such system, MWC 480. The HiCIAO data were obtained at a historic minimum of the NIR excess. The disk is detected in scattered light from 0\farcs2-1\farcs0 (27.4-137AU). Together with the marginal detection of the disk from 1998 February 24 by HST/NICMOS, our data constrain the opening half angle for the disk to lie between 1.3$\leq\theta\leq 2.2^\circ$. When compared with similar measures in CO for the gas disk from the literature, the dust disk subtends only $\sim$30% of the gas disk scale height (H/R$\sim$0.03). Such a dust disk is a factor of 5-7 flatter than transitional disks, which have structural signatures that giant planets have formed.
  • Supernova (SN) 2008ax in NGC 4490 was discovered within hours after shock breakout, presenting the rare opportunity to study a core-collapse SN beginning with the initial envelope-cooling phase immediately following shock breakout. We present an extensive sequence of optical and near-infrared spectra, as well as three epochs of optical spectropolarimetry. Our initial spectra, taken two days after shock breakout, are dominated by hydrogen Balmer lines at high velocity. However, by maximum light, He I lines dominated the optical and near-infrared spectra, which closely resembled those of normal Type Ib supernovae (SNe Ib) such as SN 1999ex. This spectroscopic transition defines Type IIb supernovae, but the strong similarity of SN 2008ax to normal SNe Ib beginning near maximum light, including an absorption feature near 6270A due to H-alpha at high velocities, suggests that many objects classified as SNe Ib in the literature may have ejected similar amounts of hydrogen as SN 2008ax, roughly a few x 0.01 M_sun. Early-time spectropolarimetry (6 and 9 days after shock breakout) revealed strong line polarization modulations of 3.4% across H-alpha, indicating the presence of large asphericities in the outer ejecta. The continuum shares a common polarization angle with the hydrogen, helium, and oxygen lines, while the calcium and iron absorptions are oriented at different angles. This is clear evidence of deviations from axisymmetry even in the outer ejecta. Intrinsic continuum polarization of 0.64% only nine days after shock breakout shows that the outer layers of the ejecta were quite aspherical. A single epoch of late-time spectropolarimetry, as well as the shapes of the nebular line profiles, demonstrate that asphericities extended from the outermost layers all the way down to the center of this SN. [Abridged]
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the "peculiar variable" DZ Cru, identified by Rushton et al. (2008, MNRAS, 386, 289) as a classical nova. A dust shell, on which are superimposed a number of features, is prominent in the 5-35micron range some 4 years after eruption. We suggest that the dust in DZ Cru is primarily hydrogenated amorphous carbon in which aliphatic bands currently predominate, and which may either become predominantly aromatic as the dust is photo-processed by ultraviolet radiation from the stellar remnant, or more likely completely destroyed.
  • We present near infrared spectroscopy of the recurrent nova RS Oph obtained on several occasions after its latest outburst in 2006 February. The 1-5 mircon spectra are dominated by the red giant, but the H I, He I, and coronal lines present during the eruption are present in all our observations. From the fits of the computed infrared spectral energy distributions to the observed fluxes we find T_eff=4200+/-200,K for the red giant. The first overtone CO bands at 2.3 micron, formed in the atmosphere of the red giant, are variable. The spectra clearly exhibit an infrared excess due to dust emission longward of 5 micron; we estimate an effective temperature for the emitting dust shell of 500K, and find that the dust emission is also variable, being beyond the limit of detection in 2007. Most likely, the secondary star in RS Oph is intrinsically variable.
  • We present the results of high-resolution optical spectroscopy, low-resolution near-IR spectroscopy and near-infrared speckle interferometry of the massive young stellar object candidate V645 Cyg, acquired to refine its fundamental parameters and the properties of its circumstellar envelope. Speckle interferometry in the $H$- and $K$-bands and an optical spectrum in the range 5200--6680 \AA with a spectral resolving power of $R$ = 60 000 were obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Another optical spectrum in the range 4300--10500 \AA with $R$ = 79 000 was obtained at the 3.6-m CFHT. Low-resolution spectra in the ranges 0.46--1.4 $\mu$m and 1.4--2.5 $\mu$m with $R \sim$ 800 and $\sim$ 700, respectively, were obtained at the 3-m Shane telescope of the Lick Observatory. Using a novel kinematical method based on the non-linear modeling of the neutral hydrogen density profile in the direction toward the object, we propose a distance of $D = 4.2\pm$0.2 kpc. We also suggest a revised estimate of the star's effective temperature, T$_{\rm eff} \sim$25 000 K. We resolved the object in both $H$- and $K$-bands. We conclude that V645 Cyg is a young, massive, main-sequence star, which recently emerged from its cocoon and has already experienced its protostellar accretion stage. The presence of accretion is not necessary to account for the high observed luminosity of (2--6)$\times 10^4$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. The receding part of a strong, mostly uniform outflow with a terminal velocity of $\sim$800 km s$^{-1}$ is only blocked from view far from the star, where forbidden lines form.
  • Infrared photometry and spectroscopy covering a time span of a quarter century are presented for HD 31648 (MWC 480) and HD 163296 (MWC 275). Both are isolated Herbig Ae stars that exhibit signs of active accretion, including driving bipolar flows with embedded Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. HD 163296 was found to be relatively quiescent photometrically in its inner disk region, with the exception of a major increase in emitted flux in a broad wavelength region centered near 3 microns in 2002. In contrast, HD 31648 has exhibited sporadic changes in the entire 3-13 micron region throughout this span of time. In both stars the changes in the 1-5 micron flux indicate structural changes in the region of the disk near the dust sublimation zone, possibly causing its distance from the star to vary with time. Repeated thermal cycling through this region will result in the preferential survival of large grains, and an increase in the degree of crystallinity. The variability observed in these objects has important consequences for the interpretation of other types of observations. For example, source variability will compromise models based on interferometry measurements unless the interferometry observations are accompanied by nearly-simultaneous photometric data.
  • We present further Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, obtained over the period 208-430 days after the 2006 eruption. The later Spitzer IRS data show that the line emission and free-free continuum emission reported earlier is declining, revealing incontrovertible evidence for the presence of silicate emission features at 9.7 and 18microns. We conclude that the silicate dust survives the hard radiation impulse and shock blast wave from the eruption. The existence of the extant dust may have significant implications for understanding the propagation of shocks through the red giant wind and likely wind geometry.
  • We present infrared spectroscopy of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, obtained 11.81, 20.75 and 55.71 days following its 2006 eruption. The spectra are dominated by hydrogen recombination lines, together with HeI, OI and OII lines; the electron temperature of ~10^4 K implied by the recombination spectrum suggests that we are seeing primarily the wind of the red giant, ionized by the ultraviolet flash when RS Oph erupted. However, strong coronal emission lines (i.e. emission from fine structure transitions in ions having high ionization potential) are present in the last spectrum. These imply a temperature of 930000K for the coronal gas; this is in line with x-ray observations of the 2006 eruption. The emission line widths decrease with time in a way that is consistent with the shock model for the x-ray emission.
  • We report 8- to 13-micron spectral observations of Neptune and Uranus from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility spanning more than a decade. The spectroscopic data indicate a steady increase in Neptune's mean atmospheric 12-micron ethane emission from 1985 to 2003, followed by a slight decrease in 2004. The simplest explanation for the intensity variation is an increase in stratospheric effective temperature from 155 +/- 3 K in 1985 to 176 +/- 3 K in 2003 (an average rate of 1.2 K/year), and subsequent decrease to 165 +/- 3 K in 2004. We also detected variation of the overall spectral structure of the ethane band, specifically an apparent absorption structure in the central portion of the band; this structure arises from coarse spectral sampling coupled with a non-uniform response function within the detector elements. We also report a probable direct detection of ethane emission on Uranus. The deduced peak mole fraction is approximately an order of magnitude higher than previous upper limits for Uranus. The model fit suggests an effective temperature of 114 +/- 3 K for the globally-averaged stratosphere of Uranus, which is consistent with recent measurements indicative of seasonal variation.
  • We present 0.35 to 2.5 micron spectra of the south and northwest filaments in the reflection nebula NGC 7023. These spectra were used to test the theory of Seahra & Duley that carbon nanoparticles are responsible for Extended Red Emission (ERE). Our spectra fail to show their predicted second emission band at 1.0 micron even though both filaments exhibit strong emission in the familiar 0.7 micron ERE band. The northwest filament spectrum does show one, and possibly two, new dust emission features in the near-infrared. We clearly detect a strong emission band at 1.5 micron which we tentatively attribute to beta-FeSi_2 grains. We tentatively detect a weaker emission band at 1.15 micron which coincides with the location expected for transitions from the conduction band to mid-gap defect states of silicon nanoparticles. This is added evidence that silicon nanoparticles are responsible for ERE as they already can explain the observed behavior of the main visible ERE band.