• We use a combination of BVJHK and Spitzer [3.6], [5.8] and [8.0] photometry to determine IR excesses for a sample of 58 LMC and 46 SMC O stars. This sample is ideal for determining IR excesses because the very small line of sight reddening minimizes uncertainties due to extinction corrections. We use the core-halo model developed by Lamers & Waters (1984a) to translate the excesses into mass loss rates and demonstrate that the results of this simple model agree with the more sophisticated CMFGEN models to within a factor of 2. Taken at face value, the derived mass loss rates are larger than those predicted by Vink et al. (2001), and the magnitude of the disagreement increases with decreasing luminosity. However, the IR excesses need not imply large mass loss rates. Instead, we argue that they probably indicate that the outer atmospheres of O stars contain complex structures and that their winds are launched with much smaller velocity gradients than normally assumed. If this is the case, it could affect the theoretical and observational interpretations of the "weak wind" problem, where classical mass loss indicators suggest that the mass loss rates of lower luminosity O stars are far less than expected.
  • We analyze 10 UV time series for 5 stars which fulfill specific sampling and spectral criteria to constrain the origin of large-scale wind structure in O stars. We argue that excited state lines must arise close to the stellar surface and are an excellent diagnostic complement to resonance lines which, due to radiative transfer effects, rarely show variability at low velocity. Consequently, we splice dynamic spectra of the excited state line, N IV1718, at low velocity to those of 1393 component of the Si IV 1400 doublet at high velocity in order to examine the temporal evolution of wind line features. These spliced time series reveal that nearly all of the features observed in the time series originate at or very near the stellar surface. Further, we positively identify the observational signature of equatorial co-rotating interaction regions in two of the five stars and possibly two others. In addition, we see no evidence for features originating further out in the wind. We use our results to consolidate the fact that the features seen in dynamic spectra must be huge, in order to remain in the line of sight for days, persisting to very large velocity and that the photospheric footprint of the features must also be quite large, ~ 15 - 20% of the stellar diameter.
  • We analyze a 162 ks HETG Chandra observation of the O7.5 III(n)((f)) star xi Per, together with contemporaneous H alpha observations. The X-ray spectrum of this star is similar to other single O stars, and not pathological in any way. Its UV wind lines are known to display cyclical time variability, with a period of 2.086 days, which is thought to be associated with co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs). We examine the Chandra and H alpha data for variability on this time scale. We find that the X-rays vary by about 15% over the course of the observations and that this variability is out of phase with variable absorption on the blue wing of the H alpha profiles (assumed to be a surrogate for the UV absorption associated with CIRs). While not conclusive, both sets of data are consistent with models where the CIRs are either a source of X-rays or modulate them.
  • The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope in May, 2009 as part of Servicing Mission 4 to provide high sensitivity, medium and low resolution spectroscopy at far- and near-ultraviolet wavelengths (FUV, NUV). COS is the most sensitive FUV/NUV spectrograph flown to date, spanning the wavelength range from 900{\AA} to 3200{\AA} with peak effective area approaching 3000 cm^2. This paper describes instrument design, the results of the Servicing Mission Orbital Verification (SMOV), and the ongoing performance monitoring program.
  • We present the first ultraviolet (UV) and multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of 30 Dor 016, a massive O2-type star on the periphery of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The UV data were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Servicing Mission Observatory Verification program after Servicing Mission 4, and reveal #016 to have one of the fastest stellar winds known. From analysis of the CIV 1548-51 doublet we find a terminal velocity, v_infty=3450 +/- 50km/s. Optical spectroscopy is from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey, from which we rule out a massive companion (with 2d<P<1yr) to a confidence of 98%. The radial velocity of #016 is offset from the systemic value by -85km/s, suggesting that the star has traveled the 120pc from the core of 30 Doradus as a runaway, ejected via dynamical interactions.
  • We present the results of optical wavelength observations of the unusual SMC eclipsing binary system HD 5980 obtained in 1999 and 2004--2005. Radial velocity curves for the erupting LBV/WR object (star A) and its close WR-like companion (star B) are obtained by deblending the variable emission-line profiles of N IV and N V lines under the simplistic assumption that these lines originate primarily in the winds of star A and star B. The derived masses M_A=58--79 Mo and M_B=51--67 Mo, are more consistent with the stars' location near the top of the HRD than previous estimates. The presence of a wind-wind interaction region is inferred from the orbital phase-dependent behavior of He I P Cygni absorption components. The emission-line intensities continued with the declining trend previously seen in UV spectra. The behavior of the photospheric absorption lines is consistent with the results of Schweickhardt (2002) who concludes that the third object in the combined spectrum, star C, is also a binary system with P(starC)~96.5 days, e=0.83. The data used in this paper will be made publicly available for further analysis.
  • The 6.4 day classical Cepheid AW Per is a spectroscopic binary with a period of 40 years. Analyzing the centroids of HST/STIS spectra obtained in November 2001, we have determined the angular separation of the binary system. Although we currently have spatially resolved data for a single epoch in the orbit, the success of our approach opens the possibility of determining the inclination, sini, for the system if the measurements are repeated at additional epochs. Since the system is potentially a double lined spectroscopic binary, the combination of spectroscopic orbits for both components and the visual orbit would give the distance to the system and the masses of its components, thereby providing a direct measurement of a Cepheid mass.
  • We review the effects of clumping on the profiles of resonance doublets. By allowing the ratio of the doublet oscillator strenghts to be a free parameter, we demonstrate that doublet profiles contain more information than is normally utilized. In clumped (or porous) winds, this ratio can lies between unity and the ratio of the f-values, and can change as a function of velocity and time, depending on the fraction of the stellar disk that is covered by material moving at a particular velocity at a given moment. Using these insights, we present the results of SEI modeling of a sample of B supergiants, zeta Pup and a time series for a star whose terminal velocity is low enough to make the components of its Si IV 1400 doublet independent. These results are interpreted within the framework of the Oskinova et al. (2007) model, and demonstrate how the doublet profiles can be used to extract infromation about wind structure.
  • We study the IR-through-UV interstellar extinction curves towards 328 Galactic B and late-O stars. We use a new technique which employs stellar atmosphere models in lieu of unreddened "standard" stars. This technique is capable of virtually eliminating spectral mismatch errors in the curves. It also allows a quantitative assessment of the errors and enables a rigorous testing of the significance of relationships between various curve parameters, regardless of whether their uncertainties are correlated. Analysis of the curves gives the following results: (1) In accord with our previous findings, the central position of the 2175 A extinction bump is mildly variable, its width is highly variable, and the two variations are unrelated. (2) Strong correlations are found among some extinction properties within the UV region, and within the IR region. (3) With the exception of a few curves with extreme (i.e., large) values of R(V), the UV and IR portions of Galactic extinction curves are not correlated with each other. (4) The large sightline-to-sightline variation seen in our sample implies that any average Galactic extinction curve will always reflect the biases of its parent sample. (5) The use of an average curve to deredden a spectral energy distribution (SED) will result in significant errors, and a realistic error budget for the dereddened SED must include the observed variance of Galactic curves. While the observed large sightline-to-sightline variations, and the lack of correlation among the various features of the curves, make it difficult to meaningfully characterize average extinction properties, they demonstrate that extinction curves respond sensitively to local conditions. Thus, each curve contains potentially unique information about the grains along its sightline.
  • The winds of stars with very specific temperatures and luminosities are ideal for determining the magnitude and nature of mass loss in OB stars. I identify these stars and analyze their wind lines. The results are discussed within the context of recent findings which appear to indicate that the mass-loss rates of OB stars may as much as an order of magnitude less than commonly accepted values.
  • Building upon a previous analysis of P V wind lines in LMC O stars, we analyze the P V wind lines in a sample of Galactic O stars which have empirical mass loss rates determined from either their radio fluxes or H alpha profiles. Since the wind analysis provides a measure of \dot{M}q where q is the ionization fraction of the ion, we determine q(P V) observationally. In spite of model predictions that q should be about 1 for mid-O stars, we find q(P V) is less than 0.15 throughout the O stars. We discuss the origin of this discrepancy.
  • We have used the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) to conduct a snap-shot survey of O VI variability in the winds of 66 OB-type stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. These time series consist of two or three observations separated by intervals ranging from a few days to several months. Although these time series provide the bare minimum of information required to detect variations, this survey demonstrates that the O VI doublet in the winds of OB-type stars is variable on various scales both in time and velocity. For spectral types from O3 to B1, 64% vary in time. At spectral types later than B1, no wind variability is observed. This fraction represents a lower limit on the true incidence of variability in the O VI wind lines, which is very common and probably ubiquitous. The observed variations extend over several hundreds of km/s of the wind profile and can be strong. The width over which the wind O VI profile varies is only weakly correlated with the terminal velocity (\vinf), but a significant correlation (close to a 1:1 relationship) is derived between the maximum velocity of the variation and \vinf. High velocity O VI wind absorption features (possibly related to the discrete absorption components seen in other wind lines) are also observed in 46% of the cases for spectral types from O3 to B0.5. These features are variable, but the nature of their propagation cannot be determined from this survey. If X-rays can produce sufficient O VI by Auger ionization of O VI, and the X-rays originate from strong shocks in the wind, this study suggests that stronger shocks occur more frequently near \vinf, causing an enhancement of O VI near \vinf.
  • We use a Sobolev with Exact Integration model to analyze the winds lines of 25 LMC O stars. The data include FUSE profiles of C III, N III, S IV, P V, S VI, and O VI and IUE or HST data for Si IV, C IV, and N V. Several of the FUSE lines are unsaturated, so meaningful optical depths (equivalently, mass loss rate times ionization fractions), as a function of wind velocity can be determined. Ratios of these quantities give the relative ionization as a function of velocity and demonstrate that, except for O VI in all stars and S VI in the later stars, the wind ionization shifts toward lower stages at higher velocity. Because O VI and S VI do not behave like the other ions, they must be produced by a different mechanism. Using mass-loss rates determined from the Vink et al. relationships, we derive mean ionization fractions. Because these are all less than one, the derived mass loss rates cannot be too small. However, the ion fractions for P V (expected to be dominant in some winds), never exceed 0.20. This implies that either the calculated mass loss rates or the assumed P abundances are too large, or the winds are strongly clumped. We examine correlations between the mean ion fractions and stellar parameters, and find two significant relationships. First, as expected, the mean ionization fraction of lower ions decreases with increasing temperature. Second, the mean ionization fraction of S VI in the latest stars and O VI in all stars increases with terminal velocity, re-affirming Cassinelli and Olson's conjecture that O VI is produced non-radiatively. Finally, we discuss peculiar aspects of three stars, BI 272, BI 208, and Sk-67 166.
  • We have determined the distance to a second eclipsing binary system (EB) in the Large Magellanic Cloud, HV982 (~B1 IV-V + ~B1 IV-V). The measurement of the distance -- among other properties of the system -- is based on optical photometry and spectroscopy and space-based UV/optical spectrophotometry. The analysis combines the ``classical'' EB study of light and radial velocity curves, which yields the stellar masses and radii, with a new analysis of the observed energy distribution, which yields the effective temperature, metallicity, and reddening of the system plus the distance ``attenuation factor'', essentially (radius/distance)^2. Combining the results gives the distance to HV982, which is 50.2 +/- 1.2 kpc. This distance determination consists of a detailed study of well-understood objects (B stars) in a well-understood evolutionary phase (core H burning), and is free of the biases and uncertainties that plague various other techniques. After correcting for the location of HV982, we find an implied distance to the optical center of the LMC's bar of d(LMC) = 50.7 +/- 1.2 kpc. This result differs by nearly 5 kpc from our earlier result for the EB HV2274, which implies a bar distance of 45.9 kpc. These results may reflect either marginally compatible measures of a unique LMC distance or, alternatively, suggest a significant depth to the stellar distribution in the LMC. Some evidence for this latter hypothesis is discussed.
  • Launch of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) has been followed by an extensive period of calibration and characterization as part of the preparation for normal satellite operations. Major tasks carried out during this period include initial coalignment, focusing and characterization of the four instrument channels, and a preliminary measurement of the resolution and throughput performance of the instrument. We describe the results from this test program, and present preliminary estimates of the on-orbit performance of the FUSE satellite based on a combination of this data and prelaunch laboratory measurements.
  • We present Far Ultraviolet Explorer (FUSE) spectra for three Magellanic Cloud O stars (Sk 80, Sk -67 05 and Sk -67 111) with repeated observations. The data demonstrate the capabilities of FUSE to perform time-resolved spectroscopy on extragalactic stars. The wavelength coverage of FUSE provides access to resonance lines due to less abundant species, such as sulfur, which are unsaturated in O supergiants. This allows us to examine wind variability at all velocities in resonance lines for stars with higher mass loss rates than can be studied at longer (lambda > 1150 A) wavelengths. The FUSE wavelength range also includes resonance lines from ions which bracket the expected dominant ionization stage of the wind. Our observations span 1-4 months with several densely sampled intervals of 10 hours or more. These observations reveal wind variability in all of the program stars and distinctive differences in the ionization structure and time scales of the variability. Sk -67 111 demonstrates significant wind variability on a time scale less than 10 hours and the coolest O star (Sk -67 05) exhibits the largest variations in O VI.