• Condensed-matter analogs of the Higgs boson in particle physics allow insights into its behavior in different symmetries and dimensionalities. Evidence for the Higgs mode has been reported in a number of different settings, including ultracold atomic gases, disordered superconductors, and dimerized quantum magnets. However, decay processes of the Higgs mode (which are eminently important in particle physics) have not yet been studied in condensed matter due to the lack of a suitable material system coupled to a direct experimental probe. A quantitative understanding of these processes is particularly important for low-dimensional systems where the Higgs mode decays rapidly and has remained elusive to most experimental probes. Here, we discover and study the Higgs mode in a two-dimensional antiferromagnet using spin-polarized inelastic neutron scattering. Our spin-wave spectra of Ca$_2$RuO$_4$ directly reveal a well-defined, dispersive Higgs mode, which quickly decays into transverse Goldstone modes at the antiferromagnetic ordering wavevector. Through a complete mapping of the transverse modes in the reciprocal space, we uniquely specify the minimal model Hamiltonian and describe the decay process. We thus establish a novel condensed matter platform for research on the dynamics of the Higgs mode.
  • Magnetism in transition-metal compounds (TMCs) has traditionally been associated with spin degrees of freedom, because the orbital magnetic moments are typically largely quenched. On the other hand, magnetic order in 4f- and 5d-electron systems arises from spin and orbital moments that are rigidly tied together by the large intra-atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Using inelastic neutron scattering on the archetypal 4d-electron Mott insulator Ca$_2$RuO$_4$, we report a novel form of excitonic magnetism in the intermediate-strength regime of the SOC. The magnetic order is characterized by ``soft'' magnetic moments with large amplitude fluctuations manifested by an intense, low-energy excitonic mode analogous to the Higgs mode in particle physics. This mode heralds a proximate quantum critical point separating the soft magnetic order driven by the superexchange interaction from a quantum-paramagnetic state driven by the SOC. We further show that this quantum critical point can be tuned by lattice distortions, and hence may be accessible in epitaxial thin-film structures. The unconventional spin-orbital-lattice dynamics in Ca$_2$RuO$_4$ identifies the SOC as a novel source of quantum criticality in TMCs.
  • The transport properties of domain walls in oxygen deficient multiferroic YMnO3 single crystals have been probed using conductive atomic force microscopy and piezoresponse force microscopy. Domain walls exhibit significantly enhanced conductance after being poled in electric fields, possibly induced by oxygen vacancy ordering at domain walls. The electronic conduction can be understood by the Schottky emission and Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling mechanisms. Our results show that the domain wall conductance can be modulated through band structure engineering by manipulating ordered oxygen vacancies in the poling fields.
  • The pseudogap is one of the most pervasive phenomena of high temperature superconductors. It is attributed either to incoherent Cooper pairing setting in above the superconducting transition temperature Tc, or to a hidden order parameter competing with superconductivity. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering from underdoped YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6.6) to show that the dispersion relations of spin excitations in the superconducting and pseudogap states are qualitatively different. Specifically, the extensively studied "hour glass" shape of the magnetic dispersions in the superconducting state is no longer discernible in the pseudogap state and we observe an unusual "vertical" dispersion with pronounced in-plane anisotropy. The differences between superconducting and pseudogap states are thus more profound than generally believed, suggesting a competition between these two states. Whereas the high-energy excitations are common to both states and obey the symmetry of the copper oxide square lattice, the low-energy excitations in the pseudogap state may be indicative of collective fluctuations towards a state with broken orientational symmetry predicted in theoretical work.
  • Raman scattering experiments on Na_{x}CoO_2 yH_2O single crystals show a broad electronic continuum with a pronounced peak around 100 cm-1 and a cutoff at approximately 560 cm-1over a wide range of doping levels. The electronic Raman spectra in superconducting and non-superconducting samples are similar at room temperature, but evolve in markedly different ways with decreasing temperature. For superconducting samples, the low-energy spectral weight is depleted upon cooling below T* sim 150K, indicating a opening of a pseudogap that is not present in non-superconducting materials. Weak additional phonon modes observed below T* suggest that the pseudogap is associated with charge ordering.
  • Na$_x$CoO$_2$, the parent compound of the recently synthesized superconductor Na$_x$CoO$_2$:$y$H$_2$O, exhibits bulk antiferromagnetic order below $\sim20$ K for 0.75 $\leq x \leq$ 0.9. We have performed neutron scattering experiments in which we observed Bragg reflections corresponding to A-type antiferromagnetic order in a Na$_{0.82}$CoO$_2$ single crystal and characterized the corresponding spin-wave dispersions. The spin waves exhibit a strongly energy-dependent linewidth. The in-plane and out-of-plane exchange constants resulting from a fit to a nearest-neighbor Heisenberg model are similar in magnitude, which is unexpected in view of the layered crystal structure of Na$_{x}$CoO$_2$. Possible implications of these observations are discussed.
  • Susceptibility, specific heat, and muon spin rotation measurements on high-quality single crystals of $\rm Na_{0.82}CoO_2$ have revealed bulk antiferromagnetism with N\'{e}el temperature $\rm T_N = 19.8 \pm 0.1$ K and an ordered moment perpendicular to the $\rm CoO_2$ layers. The magnetic order encompasses nearly 100% of the crystal volume. The susceptibility exhibits a broad peak around 30 K, characteristic of two-dimensional antiferromagnetic fluctuations. The in-plane resistivity is metallic at high temperatures and exhibits a minimum at $\rm T_N$.