• During pilot observations of the Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Galaxy Evolution (VESTIGE), a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey of the Virgo cluster carried out with MegaCam at the CFHT, we have observed the spiral galaxy NGC 4254 (M99). Deep Halpha+[NII] narrow-band and GALEX UV images revealed the presence of 60 compact (70-500 pc radius) star forming regions up to ~ 20 kpc outside the optical disc of the galaxy. These regions are located along a tail of HI gas stripped from the disc of the galaxy after a rapid gravitational encounter with another Virgo cluster member that simulations indicate occurred 280-750 Myr ago. We have combined the VESTIGE data with multifrequency data from the UV to the far-infrared to characterise the stellar populations of these regions and study the star formation process in an extreme environment such as the tails of stripped gas embedded in the hot intracluster medium. The colour, spectral energy distribution (SED), and linear size consistently indicate that these regions are coeval and have been formed after a single burst of star formation that occurred ~< 100 Myr ago. These regions might become free floating objects within the cluster potential well, and be the local analogues of compact sources produced after the interaction of gas-rich systems that occurred during the early formation of clusters.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • Hi-GAL is a large-scale survey of the Galactic plane, performed with Herschel in five infrared continuum bands between 70 and 500 $\mu$m. We present a band-merged catalogue of spatially matched sources and their properties derived from fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and heliocentric distances, based on the photometric catalogs presented in Molinari et al. (2016a), covering the portion of Galactic plane $-71.0^{\circ}< \ell < 67.0^{\circ}$. The band-merged catalogue contains 100922 sources with a regular SED, 24584 of which show a 70 $\mu$m counterpart and are thus considered proto-stellar, while the remainder are considered starless. Thanks to this huge number of sources, we are able to carry out a preliminary analysis of early stages of star formation, identifying the conditions that characterise different evolutionary phases on a statistically significant basis. We calculate surface densities to investigate the gravitational stability of clumps and their potential to form massive stars. We also explore evolutionary status metrics such as the dust temperature, luminosity and bolometric temperature, finding that these are higher in proto-stellar sources compared to pre-stellar ones. The surface density of sources follows an increasing trend as they evolve from pre-stellar to proto-stellar, but then it is found to decrease again in the majority of the most evolved clumps. Finally, we study the physical parameters of sources with respect to Galactic longitude and the association with spiral arms, finding only minor or no differences between the average evolutionary status of sources in the fourth and first Galactic quadrants, or between "on-arm" and "inter-arm" positions.
  • We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of star-forming objects located in the vicinities of 1 360 bubble structures throughout the Galactic Plane and their local environments. The compilation of ~70 000 star-forming sources, found in the proximity of the ionized (Hii) regions and detected in both Hi-GAL and GLIMPSE surveys, provided a broad overview of the different evolutionary stages of star-formation in bubbles, from prestellar objects to more evolved young stellar objects (YSOs). Surface density maps of star-forming objects clearly reveal an evolutionary trend where more evolved star-forming objects are found spatially located near the center, while younger star-forming objects are found at the edge of the bubbles. We derived dynamic ages for a subsample of 182 Hii regions for which kinematic distances and radio continuum flux measurements were available. We detect ~80% more star-forming sources per unit area in the direction of bubbles than in the surrounding fields. We estimate ~10% clump formation efficiency (CFE) of Hi-GAL clumps in bubbles, twice the CFE in fields not affected by feedback. We find higher CFE of protostellar clumps in younger bubbles, whose density of the bubble shells is higher. We argue that the formation rate from prestellar to protostellar phase is probably higher during the early stages of the bubble expansion. Evaluation of the fragmentation time inside the shell of bubbles advocates the preexistence of clumps in the medium before the bubble, as supported by numerical simulations. Approximately 23% of the Hi-GAL clumps are found located in the direction of a bubble, with 15% for prestellar clumps and 41% for protostellar clumps. We argue that the high fraction of protostellar clumps may be due to the acceleration of the star-formation process cause by the feedback of the (Hii) bubbles.
  • To constrain models of high-mass star formation, the Herschel/HOBYS KP aims at discovering massive dense cores (MDCs) able to host the high-mass analogs of low-mass prestellar cores, which have been searched for over the past decade. We here focus on NGC6334, one of the best-studied HOBYS molecular cloud complexes. We used Herschel PACS and SPIRE 70-500mu images of the NGC6334 complex complemented with (sub)millimeter and mid-infrared data. We built a complete procedure to extract ~0.1 pc dense cores with the getsources software, which simultaneously measures their far-infrared to millimeter fluxes. We carefully estimated the temperatures and masses of these dense cores from their SEDs. A cross-correlation with high-mass star formation signposts suggests a mass threshold of 75Msun for MDCs in NGC6334. MDCs have temperatures of 9.5-40K, masses of 75-1000Msun, and densities of 10^5-10^8cm-3. Their mid-IR emission is used to separate 6 IR-bright and 10 IR-quiet protostellar MDCs while their 70mu emission strength, with respect to fitted SEDs, helps identify 16 starless MDC candidates. The ability of the latter to host high-mass prestellar cores is investigated here and remains questionable. An increase in mass and density from the starless to the IR-quiet and IR-bright phases suggests that the protostars and MDCs simultaneously grow in mass. The statistical lifetimes of the high-mass prestellar and protostellar core phases, estimated to be 1-7x10^4yr and at most 3x10^5yr respectively, suggest a dynamical scenario of high-mass star formation. The present study provides good mass estimates for a statistically significant sample, covering the earliest phases of high-mass star formation. High-mass prestellar cores may not exist in NGC6334, favoring a scenario presented here, which simultaneously forms clouds and high-mass protostars.
  • Infra-Red(IR) astronomical databases, namely, IRAS, 2MASS, WISE, and Spitzer, are used to analyze photometric data of 126 carbon stars whose spectra are visible in the First Byurakan Survey low-resolution spectral plates. Among these, six new objects, recently confirmed on the digitized FBS plates, are included. For three of them, moderate-resolution CCD optical spectra are also presented. In this work several IR color-color diagrams are studied. Early and late-type C stars are separated in the JHK Near-Infra-Red(NIR) color-color plots, as well as in the WISE W3-W4 versus W1-W2 diagram. Late N-type Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are redder in W1-W2, while early-types(CH and R giants) are redder in W3-W4 as expected. Objects with W2-W3 > 1.0 mag. show double-peaked spectral energy distribution, indicating the existence of the circumstellar envelopes around them. 26 N-type stars have IRAS Point Source Catalog(PSC) associations. For FBS 1812+455 IRAS Low-Resolution Spectra in the wavelength range 7.7 - 22.6micron and Spitzer Space Telescope Spectra in the range 5 - 38micro are presented clearly showing absorption features of C2H2(acetylene) molecule at 7.5 and 13.7micron , and the SiC(silicone carbide) emission at 11.3micron. The mass-loss rates for eight Mira-type variables are derived from the K-[12] color and from the pulsation periods. The reddest object among the targets is N-type C star FBS 2213+421, which belong to the group of the cold post-AGB R Coronae Borealis(R CrB) variables.
  • The origin and life-cycle of molecular clouds are still poorly constrained, despite their importance for understanding the evolution of the interstellar medium. We have carried out a systematic, homogeneous, spectroscopic survey of the inner Galactic plane, in order to complement the many continuum Galactic surveys available with crucial distance and gas-kinematic information. Our aim is to combine this data set with recent infrared to sub-millimetre surveys at similar angular resolutions. The SEDIGISM survey covers 78 deg^2 of the inner Galaxy (-60 deg < l < +18 deg, |b| < 0.5 deg) in the J=2-1 rotational transition of 13CO. This isotopologue of CO is less abundant than 12CO by factors up to 100. Therefore, its emission has low to moderate optical depths, and higher critical density, making it an ideal tracer of the cold, dense interstellar medium. The data have been observed with the SHFI single-pixel instrument at APEX. The observational setup covers the 13CO(2-1) and C18O(2-1) lines, plus several transitions from other molecules. The observations have been completed. Data reduction is in progress, and the final data products will be made available in the near future. Here we give a detailed description of the survey and the dedicated data reduction pipeline. Preliminary results based on a science demonstration field covering -20 deg < l < -18.5 deg are presented. Analysis of the 13CO(2-1) data in this field reveals compact clumps, diffuse clouds, and filamentary structures at a range of heliocentric distances. By combining our data with data in the (1-0) transition of CO isotopologues from the ThrUMMS survey, we are able to compute a 3D realization of the excitation temperature and optical depth in the interstellar medium. Ultimately, this survey will provide a detailed, global view of the inner Galactic interstellar medium at an unprecedented angular resolution of ~30".
  • The expansion of HII regions can trigger the formation of stars. An overdensity of young stellar objects (YSOs) is observed at the edges of HII regions but the mechanisms that give rise to this phenomenon are not clearly identified. Moreover, it is difficult to establish a causal link between HII-region expansion and the star formation observed at the edges of these regions. A clear age gradient observed in the spatial distribution of young sources in the surrounding might be a strong argument in favor of triggering. We have observed the Galactic HII region RCW120 with herschel PACS and SPIRE photometers at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500$\mu$m. We produced temperature and H$_2$ column density maps and use the getsources algorithm to detect compact sources and measure their fluxes at herschel wavelengths. We have complemented these fluxes with existing infrared data. Fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with a modified blackbody model, we derived their envelope dust temperature and envelope mass. We computed their bolometric luminosities and discuss their evolutionary stages. The herschel data, with their unique sampling of the far infrared domain, have allowed us to characterize the properties of compact sources observed towards RCW120 for the first time. We have also been able to determine the envelope temperature, envelope mass and evolutionary stage of these sources. Using these properties we have shown that the density of the condensations that host star formation is a key parameter of the star-formation history, irrespective of their projected distance to the ionizing stars.
  • We present the physical and evolutionary properties of prestellar and protostellar clumps in the Herschel Infrared GALactic plane survey (Hi-GAL) in two large areas centered in the Galactic plane and covering the tips of the long Galactic bar at the intersection with the spiral arms. The areas fall in the longitude ranges 19 < l < 33 and 340 < l < 350, while latitude is -1 < b < 1. Newly formed high mass stars and prestellar objects are identified and their properties derived and compared. A study is also presented on five giant molecular complexes at the further edge of the bar. The star-formation rate was estimated from the quantity of proto-stars expected to form during the collapse of massive turbulent clumps into star clusters. This new method was developed by applying a Monte Carlo procedure to an evolutionary model of turbulent cores and takes into account the wide multiplicity of sources produced during the collapse. The star-formation rate density values at the tips are 1.2 +- 0.3 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2 and 1.5+-0.3 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2 in the first and fourth quadrant, respectively. The same values estimated on the entire field of view, that is including the tips of the bar and background and foreground regions, are 0.9+-0.2 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2 and 0.8+-0.2 10-3 Msol/yr/kpc2. The conversion efficiency is approximately 0.8% in the first quadrant and 0.5% in the fourth quadrant, and does not show a significant difference in proximity of the bar. The star forming regions identified through CO contours at the further edge of the bar show star-formation rate densities larger than the surrounding regions but their conversion efficiencies are comparable. Our results suggest that the star-formation activity at the bar is due to a large amount of dust and molecular material rather than being due to a triggering process.
  • Herschel observations of nearby molecular clouds suggest that interstellar filaments and prestellar cores represent two fundamental steps in the star formation process. The observations support a picture of low-mass star formation according to which ~ 0.1 pc-wide filaments form first in the cold interstellar medium, probably as a result of large-scale compression of interstellar matter by supersonic turbulent flows, and then prestellar cores arise from gravitational fragmentation of the densest filaments. Whether this scenario also applies to regions of high-mass star formation is an open question, in part because Herschel data cannot resolve the inner width of filaments in the nearest regions of massive star formation. We used the bolometer camera ArTeMiS on the APEX telescope to map the central part of the NGC6334 complex at a factor of > 3 higher resolution than Herschel at 350 microns. Combining ArTeMiS data with Herschel data allowed us to study the structure of the main filament of the complex with a resolution of 8" or < 0.07 pc at d ~ 1.7 kpc. Our study confirms that this filament is a very dense, massive linear structure with a line mass ranging from ~ 500 Msun/pc to ~ 2000 Msun/pc over nearly 10 pc. It also demonstrates that its inner width remains as narrow as W ~ 0.15 +- 0.05 pc all along the filament length, within a factor of < 2 of the characteristic 0.1 pc value found with Herschel for lower-mass filaments in the Gould Belt. While it is not completely clear whether the NGC 6334 filament will form massive stars or not in the future, it is two to three orders of magnitude denser than the majority of filaments observed in Gould Belt clouds, and yet has a very similar inner width. This points to a common physical mechanism for setting the filament width and suggests that some important structural properties of nearby clouds also hold in high-mass star forming regions.
  • (Abridged) We present the first public release of high-quality data products (DR1) from Hi-GAL, the {\em Herschel} infrared Galactic Plane Survey. Hi-GAL is the keystone of a suite of continuum Galactic Plane surveys from the near-IR to the radio, and covers five wavebands at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron, encompassing the peak of the spectral energy distribution of cold dust for 8 < T < 50K. This first Hi-GAL data release covers the inner Milky Way in the longitude range 68{\deg} > l > -70{\deg} in a |b|<1{\deg} latitude strip. Photometric maps have been produced with the ROMAGAL pipeline, that optimally capitalizes on the excellent sensitivity and stability of the bolometer arrays of the {\em Herschel} PACS and SPIRE photometric cameras, to deliver images of exquisite quality and dynamical range, absolutely calibrated with {\em Planck} and {\em IRAS}, and recovering extended emission at all wavelengths and all spatial scales. The compact source catalogues have been generated with the CuTEx algorithm, specifically developed to optimize source detection and extraction in the extreme conditions of intense and spatially varying background that are found in the Galactic Plane in the thermal infrared. Hi-GAL DR1 images will be accessible via a dedicated web-based image cutout service. The DR1 Compact Source Catalogues are delivered as single-band photometric lists containing, in addition to source position, peak and integrated flux and source sizes, a variety of parameters useful to assess the quality and reliability of the extracted sources, caveats and hints to help this assessment are provided. Flux completeness limits in all bands are determined from extensive synthetic source experiments and depend on the specific line of sight along the Galactic Plane. Hi-GAL DR1 catalogues contain 123210, 308509, 280685, 160972 and 85460 compact sources in the five bands, respectively.
  • The surroundings of HII regions can have a profound influence on their development, morphology, and evolution. This paper explores the effect of the environment on H II regions in the MonR2 molecular cloud. We aim to investigate the density structure of envelopes surrounding HII regions and to determine their collapse and ionisation expansion ages. The Mon R2 molecular cloud is an ideal target since it hosts an H II region association. Column density and temperature images derived from Herschel data were used together to model the structure of HII bubbles and their surrounding envelopes. The resulting observational constraints were used to follow the development of the Mon R2 ionised regions with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. The four hot bubbles associated with H II regions are surrounded by dense, cold, and neutral gas envelopes. The radial density profiles are reminiscent of those of low-mass protostellar envelopes. The inner parts of envelopes of all four HII regions could be free-falling because they display shallow density profiles. As for their outer parts, the two compact HII regions show a density profile, which is typical of the equilibrium structure of an isothermal sphere. In contrast, the central UCHii region shows a steeper outer profile, that could be interpreted as material being forced to collapse. The size of the heated bubbles, the spectral type of the irradiating stars, and the mean initial neutral gas density are used to estimate the ionisation expansion time, texp, 0.1Myr,for the dense UCHII and compact HII regions and 0.35 Myr for the extended HII region. The envelope transition radii between the shallow and steeper density profiles are used to estimate the time elapsed since the formation of the first proto stellar embryo, Tinf : 1Myr, for the ultra-compact, 1.5 / 3Myr for the compact, and greater than 6Myr for the extended HII regions.
  • We present Rc-band surface photometry for 170 of the 203 galaxies in GHASP, Gassendi H-Alpha survey of SPirals, a sample of late-type galaxies for which high-resolution Fabry-Perot H{\alpha} maps have previously been obtained. Our data set is constructed by new Rc-band observations taken at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), supplemented with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archival data, obtained with the purpose of deriving homogeneous photometric profiles and parameters. Our results include Rc-band surface brightness profiles for 170 galaxies and $ugriz$ profiles for 108 of these objects. We catalogue several parameters of general interest for further reference, such as total magnitude, effective radius and isophotal parameters -- magnitude, position angle, ellipticity and inclination. We also perform a structural decomposition of the surface brightness profiles using a multi-component method in order to separate disks from bulges and bars, and to observe the main scaling relations involving luminosities, sizes and maximum velocities. We determine the Rc-band Tully Fisher relation using maximum velocities derived solely from H$\alpha$ rotation curves for a sample of 80 galaxies, resulting in a slope of $-8.1 \pm 0.5$, zero point of $-3.0 \pm 1.0$ and an estimated intrinsic scatter of $0.28 \pm 0.07$. We note that, different from the TF-relation in the near-infrared derived for the same sample, no change in the slope of the relation is seen at the low-mass end (for galaxies with $V_{max} < 125$ km/s). We suggest that this different behaviour of the Tully Fisher relation (with the optical relation being described by a single power-law while the near-infrared by two) may be caused by differences in the stellar mass to light ratio for galaxies with $V_{max} < 125$ km/s.
  • The formation of high mass stars and clusters occurs in giant molecular clouds. Objects in evolved stages of massive star formation such as protostars, hot molecular cores, and ultracompact HII regions have been studied in more detail than earlier, colder objects. With this in mind, the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the whole inner Galactic plane at 870 micron (ATLASGAL) has been carried out to provide a global view of cold dust and star formation at submillimetre wavelengths. To derive kinematic distances to a large sample of ATLASGAL clumps we divided them into groups of sources, which are located close together, mostly within a radius of 2 pc, and have velocities in a similar range with a median velocity dispersion of ~ 1 km/s. Using NH3, N2H+ and CS velocities we calculate near and far kinematic distances to 296 groups of ATLASGAL sources in the first quadrant and 393 groups in the fourth quadrant. We analyse HI self-absorption and HI absorption to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity. We obtain a scale height of ~ 28+/-2 pc and displacement below the Galactic midplane of ~ -7+/-1 pc. Within distances from 2 to 18 kpc ATLASGAL clumps have a broad range of gas masses with a median of 1050 solar masses and a wide distribution of radii with a median of 0.4 pc. Their distribution in galactocentric radii is correlated with spiral arms. Using a statistically significant ATLASGAL sample we derive a power-law exponent of -2.2+/-0.1 of the clump mass function. This is consistent with the slope derived for clusters and with that of the stellar initial mass function. Examining the power-law index for different galactocentric distances and various source samples shows that it is independent of environment and evolutionary phase. Fitting the mass-size relationship by a power law gives a slope of 1.76+/-0.01 for cold sources such as IRDCs and warm clumps associated with HII regions.
  • We investigate the star formation activity in the molecular complex associated with the Galactic HII region Sh2-90, using radio-continuum maps obtained at 1280 MHz and 610 MHz, Herschel Hi-GAL observations at 70 -- 500 microns, and deep near-infrared observation at JHK bands, along with Spitzer observations. Sh2-90 presents a bubble morphology in the mid-IR (size ~ 0.9 pc x 1.6 pc). Radio observations suggest it is an evolved HII region with an electron density ~ 144 cm^-3, emission measure ~ 6.7 x 10^4 cm^-6 pc and a ionized mass ~ 55 Msun. From Hi-GAL observations it is found that the HII region is part of an elongated extended molecular cloud (size ~ 5.6 pc x 9.7 pc, H_2 column density >= 3 x 10^21 cm^-2 and dust temperature 18 -- 27 K) of total mass >= 1 x 10^4 Msun. We identify the ionizing cluster of Sh2-90, the main exciting star being an O8--O9 V star. Five cold dust clumps (mass ~ 8 -- 95 Msun), four mid-IR blobs around B stars, and a compact HII region are found at the edge of the bubble.The velocity information derived from CO (J=3-2) data cubes suggests that most of them are associated with the Sh2-90 region. 129 YSOs are identified (Class I, Class II, and near-IR excess sources). The majority of the YSOs are low mass (<= 3 Msun) sources and they are distributed mostly in the regions of high column density. Four candidate Class 0/I MYSOs have been found; they will possibly evolve to stars of mass >= 15 Msun. We suggest multi-generation star formation is present in the complex. From the evidences of interaction, the time scales involved and the evolutionary status of stellar/protostellar sources, we argue that the star formation at the immediate border/edges of Sh2-90 might have been triggered by the expanding HII region. However, several young sources in this complex are probably formed by some other processes.
  • Constraints on the mass distribution in high-redshift clusters of galaxies are not currently very strong. We aim to constrain the mass profile, M(r), and dynamical status of the $z \sim 0.8$ LCDCS 0504 cluster of galaxies characterized by prominent giant gravitational arcs near its center. Our analysis is based on deep X-ray, optical, and infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopy. We model the mass distribution of the cluster with three different mass density profiles, whose parameters are constrained by the strong lensing features of the inner cluster region, by the X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium, and by the kinematics of 71 cluster members. We obtain consistent M(r) determinations from three methods (dispersion-kurtosis, caustics and MAMPOSSt), out to the cluster virial radius and beyond. The mass profile inferred by the strong lensing analysis in the central cluster region is slightly above, but still consistent with, the kinematics estimate. On the other hand, the X-ray based M(r) is significantly below both the kinematics and strong lensing estimates. Theoretical predictions from $\Lambda$CDM cosmology for the concentration--mass relation are in agreement with our observational results, when taking into account the uncertainties in both the observational and theoretical estimates. There appears to be a central deficit in the intra-cluster gas mass fraction compared to nearby clusters. Despite the relaxed appearance of this cluster, the determinations of its mass profile by different probes show substantial discrepancies, the origin of which remains to be determined. The extension of a similar dynamical analysis to other clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey will allow to shed light on the possible systematics that affect the determination of mass profiles of high-z clusters, possibly related to our incomplete understanding of intracluster baryon physics.
  • Ionization feedback should impact the probability distribution function (PDF) of the column density around the ionized gas. We aim to quantify this effect and discuss its potential link to the Core and Initial Mass Function (CMF/IMF). We used in a systematic way Herschel column density maps of several regions observed within the HOBYS key program: M16, the Rosette and Vela C molecular cloud, and the RCW 120 H ii region. We fitted the column density PDFs of all clouds with two lognormal distributions, since they present a double-peak or enlarged shape in the PDF. Our interpretation is that the lowest part of the column density distribution describes the turbulent molecular gas while the second peak corresponds to a compression zone induced by the expansion of the ionized gas into the turbulent molecular cloud. The condensations at the edge of the ionized gas have a steep compressed radial profile, sometimes recognizable in the flattening of the power-law tail. This could lead to an unambiguous criterion able to disentangle triggered from pre-existing star formation. In the context of the gravo-turbulent scenario for the origin of the CMF/IMF, the double peaked/enlarged shape of the PDF may impact the formation of objects at both the low-mass and the high-mass end of the CMF/IMF. In particular a broader PDF is required by the gravo-turbulent scenario to fit properly the IMF with a reasonable initial Mach number for the molecular cloud. Since other physical processes (e.g. the equation of state and the variations among the core properties) have already been suggested to broaden the PDF, the relative importance of the different effects remains an open question.
  • We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift. The percentage of mass included in substructures was found to be roughly constant with redshift with values of 5-15%, in agreement both with the general CDM framework and with the results of numerical simulations. Galaxies in substructures show the same general behaviour as regular cluster galaxies; however, in substructures, there is a deficiency of both late type and old stellar population galaxies. Late type galaxies with recent bursts of star formation seem to be missing in the substructures close to the bottom of the host cluster potential well. However, our sample would need to be increased to allow a more robust analysis.
  • W5-E has been observed with the Herschel-PACS and -SPIRE photometers, at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns. The dust temperature map shows a rather uniform temperature, in the range 17.5-20 K in the dense condensations or filaments, 21-22 K in the photodissociation regions, and 24-31 K in the direction of the ionized regions. The column densities are rather low, everywhere lower than 10^23 cm-2, and of the order of a few 10^21 cm-2 in the PDRs. About 8000 solar masses of neutral material surrounds the ionized region, which is low with respect to the volume of this HII region; we suggest that the exciting stars of the W5-E, W5-W, Sh~201, A and B HII regions formed along a dense filament or sheet rather than inside a more spherical cloud. Fifty point sources have been detected at 100 microns. Most of them are Class 0/I YSOs. The SEDs of their envelopes have been fitted using a modified blackbody model. These envelopes are cold, with a mean temperature of 15.7+-1.8K. Their masses are in the range 1.3-47 solar masses. Eleven of these point sources are candidate Class 0 YSOs. Twelve of these point sources are possibly at the origin of bipolar outflows detected in this region. None of the YSOs contain a massive central object, but a few may form a massive star as they have both a massive envelope and also a high envelope accretion rate. Most of the Class 0/I YSOs are observed in the direction of high column density material, for example in the direction of the massive condensations present at the waist of the bipolar Sh 201 HII region or enclosed by the bright-rimmed cloud BRC14. The overdensity of Class 0/I YSOs on the borders of the HII regions strongly suggests that triggered star formation is at work in this region but, due to insufficient resolution, the exact processes at the origin of the triggering are difficult to determine.
  • In order to characterise the cloud structures responsible for the formation of high-mass stars, we present Herschel observations of the DR21 environment. Maps of the column density and dust temperature unveil the structure of the DR21 ridge and several connected filaments. The ridge has column densities larger than 1e23/cm^2 over a region of 2.3 pc^2. It shows substructured column density profiles and branching into two major filaments in the north. The masses in the studied filaments range between 130 and 1400 Msun whereas the mass in the ridge is 15000 Msun. The accretion of these filaments onto the DR21 ridge, suggested by a previous molecular line study, could provide a continuous mass inflow to the ridge. In contrast to the striations seen in e.g., the Taurus region, these filaments are gravitationally unstable and form cores and protostars. These cores formed in the filaments potentially fall into the ridge. Both inflow and collisions of cores could be important to drive the observed high-mass star formation. The evolutionary gradient of star formation running from DR21 in the south to the northern branching is traced by decreasing dust temperature. This evolution and the ridge structure can be explained by two main filamentary components of the ridge that merged first in the south.
  • Because of their relatively simple morphology, "bubble" HII regions have been instrumental to our understanding of star formation triggered by HII regions. With the far-infrared (FIR) spectral coverage of the Herschel satellite, we can access the wavelengths where these regions emit the majority of their energy through their dust emission. At Herschel wavelengths 70 micron to 500 micron, the emission associated with HII regions is dominated by the cool dust in their photodissociation regions (PDRs). We find average dust temperatures of 26K along the PDRs, with little variation between the HII regions in the sample, while local filaments and infrared dark clouds average 19K and 15K respectively. Higher temperatures lead to higher values of the Jeans mass, which may affect future star formation. The mass of the material in the PDR, collected through the expansion of the HII region, is between ~300 and ~10,000 Solar masses for the HII regions studied here. These masses are in rough agreement with the expected masses swept up during the expansion of the \hii\ regions. Approximately 20% of the total FIR emission is from the direction of the bubble central regions. This suggests that we are detecting emission from the "near-side" and "far-side" PDRs along the line of sight and that bubbles are three-dimensional structures. We find only weak support for a relationship between dust temperature and beta, of a form similar to that caused by noise and calibration uncertainties alone.
  • We collected multiband imaging and spectroscopy for two fossil groups (RX J1119.7+2126 and 1RXS J235814.4+150524) and one normal group (NGC 6034). We computed photometric redshifts in the central zones of each group, combining previous data with the SDSS five-band data. For each group we investigated the red sequence (RS) of the color-magnitude relation and computed the luminosity functions, stellar population ages and distributions of the group members. Spectroscopy allowed us to investigate the large-scale surroundings of these groups and the substructure levels in 1RXS J235814.4+150524 and NGC 6034. The large-scale environment of 1RXS J235814.4+150524 is poor, though its galaxy density map shows a clear signature of the surrounding cosmic web. RX J1119.7+2126 appears to be very isolated, while the cosmic environment of NGC 6034 is very rich. At the group scale, 1RXS J235814.4+150524 shows no substructure. Galaxies with recent stellar populations seem preferentially located in the group outskirts. A RS is discernable for all three groups in a color-magnitude diagram. The luminosity functions based on photometric redshift selection and on statistical background subtraction have comparable shapes, and agree with the few points obtained from spectroscopic redshifts. These luminosity functions show the expected dip between first and second brightest galaxies for the fossil groups only. Their shape is also regular and relatively flat at faint magnitudes down to the completeness level for RX J1119.7+2126 and NGC 6034, while there is a clear lack of faint galaxies for 1RXS J235814.4+150524. RX J1119.7+2126 is definitely classified as a fossil group; 1RXS J235814.4+150524 also has properties very close to those of a fossil group, while we confirm that NGC 6034 is a normal group.
  • The study of intracluster light can help us to understand the mechanisms taking place in galaxy clusters, and to place constraints on the cluster formation history and physical properties. However, owing to the intrinsic faintness of ICL emission, most searches and detailed studies of ICL have been limited to redshifts z<0.4.We search for ICL in a subsample of ten clusters detected by the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS), at redshifts 0.4<z<0.8, that are also part of our DAFT/FADA Survey. We analyze the ICL by applying the OV WAV package, a wavelet-based technique, to deep HST ACS images in the F814W filter and to V-band VLT/FORS2 images of three clusters. Detection levels are assessed as a function of the diffuse light source surface brightness using simulations. In the F814W filter images, we detect diffuse light sources in all the clusters, with typical sizes of a few tens of kpc (assuming that they are at the cluster redshifts). The ICL detected by stacking the ten F814W images shows an 8sigma detection in the source center extending over a ~50x50kpc2 area, with a total absolute magnitude of -21.6 in the F814W filter, equivalent to about two L* galaxies per cluster. We find a weak correlation between the total F814W absolute magnitude of the ICL and the cluster velocity dispersion and mass. There is no apparent correlation between the cluster mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and the amount of ICL, and no evidence for any preferential orientation in the ICL source distribution. We find no strong variation in the amount of ICL between z=0 and z=0.8. In addition, we find wavelet-detected compact objects (WDCOs) in the three clusters for which data in two bands are available; these objects are probably very faint compact galaxies that in some cases are members of the respective clusters. We have shown that ICL is important in clusters at least up to z=0.8.
  • We summarize the first results from the Gould Belt survey, obtained toward the Aquila Rift and Polaris Flare regions during the 'science demonstration phase' of Herschel. Our 70-500 micron images taken in parallel mode with the SPIRE and PACS cameras reveal a wealth of filamentary structure, as well as numerous dense cores embedded in the filaments. Between ~ 350 and 500 prestellar cores and ~ 45-60 Class 0 protostars can be identified in the Aquila field, while ~ unbound starless cores and no protostars are observed in the Polaris field. The prestellar core mass function (CMF) derived for the Aquila region bears a strong resemblance to the stellar initial mass function (IMF), already confirming the close connection between the CMF and the IMF with much better statistics than earlier studies. Comparing and contrasting our Herschel results in Aquila and Polaris, we propose an observationally-driven scenario for core formation according to which complex networks of long, thin filaments form first within molecular clouds, and then the densest filaments fragment into a number of prestellar cores via gravitational instability.
  • We present a preliminary analysis of the small-scale structure found in new 70-520 micron continuum maps of the Rosette molecular cloud (RMC), obtained with the SPIRE and PACS instruments of the Herschel Space Observatory. We find 473 clumps within the RMC using a new structure identification algorithm, with sizes up to ~1.0 pc in diameter. A comparison with recent Spitzer maps reveals that 371 clumps are "starless" (without an associated young stellar object), while 102 are "protostellar." Using the respective values of dust temperature, we determine the clumps have masses (M_C) over the range -0.75 <= log (M_C/M_sun) <= 2.50. Linear fits to the high-mass tails of the resulting clump mass spectra (CMS) have slopes that are consistent with those found for high-mass clumps identified in CO emission by other groups.