• Results are presented for [CII] 158 micron line fluxes observed with the Herschel PACS instrument in 112 sources with both starburst and AGN classifications, of which 102 sources have confident detections. Results are compared with mid-infrared spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrometer and with L(IR) from IRAS fluxes; AGN/starburst classifications are determined from equivalent width of the 6.2 micron PAH feature. It is found that the [CII] line flux correlates closely with the flux of the 11.3 micron PAH feature independent of AGN/starburst classification, log [f([CII] 158 micron)/f(11.3 micron PAH)] = -0.22 +- 0.25. It is concluded that [CII] line flux measures the photodissociation region associated with starbursts in the same fashion as the PAH feature. A calibration of star formation rate for the starburst component in any source having [CII] is derived comparing [CII] luminosity L([CII]) to L(IR) with the result that log SFR = log L([CII)]) - 7.08 +- 0.3, for SFR in solar masses per year and L([CII]) in solar luminosities. The decreasing ratio of L([CII]) to L(IR) in more luminous sources (the "[CII] deficit") is shown to be a consequence of the dominant contribution to L(IR) arising from a luminous AGN component because the sources with largest L(IR) and smallest L([CII])/L(IR) are AGN.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of 22 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z~2 with extremely red R-[24] colors (called dust-obscured galaxies, or DOGs) which have a local maximum in their spectral energy distribution (SED) at rest-frame 1.6um associated with stellar emission. These sources, which we call "bump DOGs", have star-formation rates of 400-4000 Msun/yr and have redshifts derived from mid-IR spectra which show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission --- a sign of vigorous on-going star-formation. Using a uniform morphological analysis, we look for quantifiable differences between bump DOGs, power-law DOGs (Spitzer-selected ULIRGs with mid-IR SEDs dominated by a power-law and spectral features that are more typical of obscured active galactic nuclei than starbursts), sub-millimeter selected galaxies (SMGs), and other less-reddened ULIRGs from the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey (XFLS). Bump DOGs are larger than power-law DOGs (median Petrosian radius of 8.4 +/- 2.7 kpc vs. 5.5 +/- 2.3 kpc) and exhibit more diffuse and irregular morphologies (median M_20 of -1.08 +/- 0.05 vs. -1.48 +/- 0.05). These trends are qualitatively consistent with expectations from simulations of major mergers in which merging systems during the peak star-formation rate period evolve from M_20 = -1.0 to M_20 = -1.7. Less obscured ULIRGs (i.e., non-DOGs) tend to have more regular, centrally peaked, single-object morphologies rather than diffuse and irregular morphologies. This distinction in morphologies may imply that less obscured ULIRGs sample the merger near the end of the peak star-formation rate period. Alternatively, it may indicate that the intense star-formation in these less-obscured ULIRGs is not the result of a recent major merger.
  • We present high spatial resolution optical and near-infrared imaging obtained using the ACS, WFPC2 and NICMOS cameras aboard the Hubble Space Telescope of 31 24um--bright z~2 Dust Obscured Galaxies (DOGs) identified in the Bootes Field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Although this subset of DOGs have mid-IR spectral energy distributions dominated by a power-law component suggestive of an AGN, all but one of the galaxies are spatially extended and not dominated by an unresolved component at rest-frame UV or optical wavelengths. The observed V-H and I-H colors of the extended components are 0.2-3 magnitudes redder than normal star-forming galaxies. All but 1 have axial ratios >0.3, making it unlikely that DOGs are composed of an edge-on star-forming disk. We model the spatially extended component of the surface brightness distributions of the DOGs with a Sersic profile and find effective radii of 1-6 kpc. This sample of DOGs is smaller than most sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs), but larger than quiescent high-redshift galaxies. Non-parametric measures (Gini and M20) of DOG morphologies suggest that these galaxies are more dynamically relaxed than local ULIRGs. We estimate lower limits to the stellar masses of DOGs based on the rest-frame optical photometry and find that these range from ~10^(9-11) M_sun. If major mergers are the progenitors of DOGs, then these observations suggest that DOGs may represent a post-merger evolutionary stage.
  • We report on--off pointed MAMBO observations at 1.2 mm of 61 Spitzer-selected star-forming galaxies from the SWIRE survey. The sources are selected on the basis of bright 24um fluxes (f_24um>0.4mJy) and of stellar dominated near-infrared spectral energy distributions in order to favor z~2 starburst galaxies. The average 1.2mm flux for the whole sample is 1.5+/-0.2 mJy. Our analysis focuses on 29 sources in the Lockman Hole field where the average 1.2mm flux (1.9+/-0.3 mJy) is higher than in other fields (1.1+/-0.2 mJy). The analysis of the sources multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions indicates that they are starburst galaxies with far-infrared luminosities ~10^12-10^13.3 Lsun, and stellar masses of ~0.2-6 x10^11 M_sun. Compared to sub-millimeter selected galaxies (SMGs), the SWIRE-MAMBO sources are among those with the largest 24um/millimeter flux ratios. The origin of such large ratios is investigated by comparing the average mid-infrared spectra and the stacked far-infrared spectral energy distributions of the SWIRE-MAMBO sources and of SMGs. The mid-infrared spectra exhibit strong PAH features, and a warm dust continuum. The warm dust continuum contributes to ~34% of the mid-infrared emission, and is likely associated with an AGN component. This constribution is consistent with what is found in SMGs. The large 24um/1.2mm flux ratios are thus not due to AGN emission, but rather to enhanced PAH emission compared to SMGs. The analysis of the stacked far-infrared fluxes yields warmer dust temperatures than typically observed in SMGs. Our selection favors warm ultra-luminous infrared sources at high-z, a class of objects that is rarely found in SMG samples. Our sample is the largest Spitzer-selected sample detected at millimeter wavelengths currently available.
  • The spectral energy distributions and infrared (IR) spectra of a sample of obscured AGNs selected in the mid-IR are modeled with recent clumpy torus models to investigate the nature of the sources, the properties of the obscuring matter, and dependencies on luminosity. The sample contains 21 obscured AGNs at z=1.3-3 discovered in the largest Spitzer surveys (SWIRE, NDWFS, & FLS) by means of their extremely red IR to optical colors. All sources show the 9.7micron silicate feature in absorption and have extreme mid-IR luminosities (L(6micron)~10^46 erg/s). The IR SEDs and spectra of 12 sources are well reproduced with a simple torus model, while the remaining 9 sources require foreground extinction from a cold dust component to reproduce both the depth of the silicate feature and the near-IR emission from hot dust. The best-fit torus models show a broad range of inclinations, with no preference for the edge-on torus expected in obscured AGNs. Based on the unobscured QSO mid-IR luminosity function, and on a color-selected sample of obscured and unobscured IR sources, we estimate the surface densities of obscured and unobscured QSOs at L(6micron)>10^12 Lsun, and z=1.3-3.0 to be about 17-22 deg^-2, and 11.7 deg^-2, respectively. Overall we find that ~35-41% of luminous QSOs are unobscured, 37-40% are obscured by the torus, and 23-25% are obscured by a cold absorber detached from the torus. These fractions constrain the torus half opening angle to be ~67 deg. This value is significantly larger than found for FIR selected samples of AGN at lower luminosity (~46 deg), supporting the receding torus scenario. A far-IR component is observed in 8 objects. The estimated far-IR luminosities associated with this component all exceed 3.3x10^12 Lsun, implying SFRs of 600-3000 Msun/yr. (Abridged)
  • Spectra have been obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope for 20 sources in the Lockman Hole field of the SWIRE survey. The sample is divided between sources with indicators of an obscured AGN, based primarily on X-ray detections of optically-faint sources, and sources with indicators of a starburst, based on optical and near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) which show a luminosity peak from stellar photospheric emission. Ten of the 11 AGN sources have IRS spectra which show silicate absorption or are power laws; only one AGN source shows PAH emission features. All 9 of the sources showing starburst SEDs in the near-infrared show PAH emission features in the IRS spectra. Redshifts are determined from the IRS spectra for all 9 starbursts (1.0 < z < 1.9) and 8 of the 11 AGN (0.6 < z < 2.5). Classification as AGN because of an X-ray detection, the classification as AGN or starburst derived from the photometric SED, and the IRS spectroscopic classification as AGN (silicate absorption) or starburst (PAH emission) are all consistent in 18 of 20 sources. The surface density for starbursts which are most luminous in the mid-infrared is less than that for the most luminous AGN within the redshift interval 1.7 < z < 1.9. This result implies that mid-infrared source counts at high redshift are dominated by AGN for f(24micron) > 1.0 mJy.
  • We determine the contribution of AGN to the mid-IR emission of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) at z>0.6 by measuring the mid-IR dust continuum slope of 20,039 mid-IR sources. The 24 micron sources are selected from a Spitzer/MIPS survey of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bo\"otes field and have corresponding 8 micron data from the IRAC Shallow Survey. There is a clear bimodal distribution in the 24 micron to 8 micron flux ratio. The X-ray detected sources fall within the peak corresponding to a flat spectrum in nufnu, implying that it is populated by AGN-dominated LIRGs, whereas the peak corresponding to a higher 24 micron to 8 micron flux ratio is likely due to LIRGs whose infrared emission is powered by starbursts. The 24 micron emission is increasingly dominated by AGN at higher 24 micron flux densities (f_24): the AGN fraction of the z>0.6 sources increases from ~9% at f_24 ~ 0.35 mJy to 74+/-20% at f_24 ~ 3 mJy in good agreement with model predictions. Deep 24 micron, small area surveys, like GOODS, will be strongly dominated by starburst galaxies. AGN are responsible for ~ 3-7% of the total 24 micron background.
  • Using the 16$\mu$m peakup imager on the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on Spitzer, we present a serendipitous survey of 0.0392 deg$^{2}$ within the area of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey in Bootes. Combining our results with the available Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24$\mu$m survey of this area, we produce a catalog of 150 16$\mu$m sources brighter than 0.18 mJy (3$\sigma$) for which we derive measures or limits on the 16/24$\mu$m colors. Such colors are especially useful in determining redshifts for sources whose mid infrared spectra contain strong emission or absorption features that characterize these colors as a function of redshift. We find that the 9.7$\mu$m silicate absorption feature in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) results in sources brighter at 16$\mu$m than at 24$\mu$m at z $\sim$ 1--1.8 by at least 20%. With a threshold flux ratio of 1.2, restricting our analysis to $>5\sigma$ detections at 16$\mu$m, and using a $3\sigma$ limit on 24$\mu$m non-detections, the number of silicate-absorbed ULIRG candidates is 36. This defines a strong upper limit of $\sim$920 sources deg$^{-2}$, on the population of silicate-absorbed ULIRGs at z $\sim$ 1--1.8. This source count is about half of the total number of sources predicted at z $\sim$ 1--2 by various phenomenological models. We note that the high 16/24$\mu$m colors measured cannot be reproduced by any of the mid-IR spectral energy distributions assumed by these models, which points to the strong limitations currently affecting our phenomenological and theoretical understanding of infrared galaxy evolution.
  • We report the discovery of a very large, spatially extended Ly alpha -emitting nebula at z=2.656 associated with a luminous mid-infrared source. The bright mid-infrared source (F(24um)=0.86 mJy) was first detected in observations made using the Spitzer Space Telescope. Existing broad-band imaging data from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey revealed the mid-infrared source to be associated with a diffuse, spatially extended, optical counterpart in the Bw band. Spectroscopy and further imaging of this target reveals that the optical source is an almost purely line-emitting nebula with little, if any, detectable diffuse continuum emission. The Lya nebula has a luminosity of L[Lya] ~ 1.7e44 erg/s and an extent of at least 20 arcsec (160 kpc). Its central ~8 arcsec shows an ordered, monotonic velocity profile; interpreted as rotation, this region encloses a mass M = 6e12 Msun. Several sources lie within the nebula. The central region of the nebula shows narrow (~365 km/s) emission lines of CIV and HeII. The mid-infrared source is a compact object lying within the nebula, but offset from the center by a projected distance of ~2.5 arcsec (20 kpc), and likely to be an enshrouded AGN. A young star-forming galaxy lies near the northern end of the nebula. We suggest that the nebula is a site of recent multiple galaxy and AGN formation, with the spatial distribution of galaxies within the nebula perhaps tracking the formation history of the system.
  • We have surveyed a field covering 9.0 degrees^2 within the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey region in Bootes with the Multiband Imaging Photometer on the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) to a limiting 24 um flux density of 0.3 mJy. Thirty one sources from this survey with F(24um) > 0.75 mJy which are optically very faint (R > 24.5 mag) have been observed with the low-resolution modules of the Infrared Spectrograph on SST. Redshifts derived primarily from strong silicate absorption features are reported here for 17 of these sources; 10 of these are optically invisible (R > 26 mag), with no counterpart in B_W, R, or I. The observed redshifts for 16 sources are 1.7 < z < 2.8. These represent a newly discovered population of highly obscured sources at high redshift with extreme infrared to optical ratios. Using IRS spectra of local galaxies as templates, we find that a majority of the sources have mid-infrared spectral shapes most similar to ultraluminous infrared galaxies powered primarily by AGN. Assuming the same templates also apply at longer wavelengths, bolometric luminosities exceed 10^13 L(solar).
  • We present observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 7714 with the Infrared Spectrograph IRS on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra yield a wealth of ionic and molecular features that allow a detailed characterization of its properties. NGC 7714 has an HII region-like spectrum with strong PAH emission features. We find no evidence for an obscured active galactic nucleus, and with [NeIII]/[NeII]~0.73, NGC7714 lies near the upper end of normal-metallicity starburst galaxies. With very little slicate absorption and a temperature of the hottest dust component of 340K, NGC 7714 is the perfect template for a young, unobscured starburst