• This report describes the 2014 study by the Science Definition Team (SDT) of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission. It is a space observatory that will address the most compelling scientific problems in dark energy, exoplanets and general astrophysics using a 2.4-m telescope with a wide-field infrared instrument and an optical coronagraph. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey recommended a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope as its top priority for a new large space mission. As conceived by the decadal survey, WFIRST would carry out a dark energy science program, a microlensing program to determine the demographics of exoplanets, and a general observing program utilizing its ultra wide field. In October 2012, NASA chartered a Science Definition Team (SDT) to produce, in collaboration with the WFIRST Study Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL, a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for an implementation of WFIRST using one of the 2.4-m, Hubble-quality telescope assemblies recently made available to NASA. This DRM builds on the work of the earlier WFIRST SDT, reported by Green et al. (2012) and the previous WFIRST-2.4 DRM, reported by Spergel et. (2013). The 2.4-m primary mirror enables a mission with greater sensitivity and higher angular resolution than the 1.3-m and 1.1-m designs considered previously, increasing both the science return of the primary surveys and the capabilities of WFIRST as a Guest Observer facility. The addition of an on-axis coronagraphic instrument to the baseline design enables imaging and spectroscopic studies of planets around nearby stars.
  • In this report, we present a wide variety of ways in which information from multiple probes of dark energy may be combined to obtain additional information not accessible when they are considered separately. Fundamentally, because all major probes are affected by the underlying distribution of matter in the regions studied, there exist covariances between them that can provide information on cosmology. Combining multiple probes allows for more accurate (less contaminated by systematics) and more precise (since there is cosmological information encoded in cross-correlation statistics) measurements of dark energy. The potential of cross-correlation methods is only beginning to be realized. By bringing in information from other wavelengths, the capabilities of the existing probes of dark energy can be enhanced and systematic effects can be mitigated further. We present a mixture of work in progress and suggestions for future scientific efforts. Given the scope of future dark energy experiments, the greatest gains may only be realized with more coordination and cooperation between multiple project teams; we recommend that this interchange should begin sooner, rather than later, to maximize scientific gains.
  • The past three decades have seen prodigious advances in astronomy and astrophysics. Beginning with the exploration of our solar system and continuing through the pioneering Explorers and Great Observatories of today, NASA missions have made essential contributions to these advances. This roadmap presents a science-driven 30-year vision for the future of NASA Astrophysics that builds on these achievements to address some of our most ancient and fundamental questions: Are we alone? How did we get here? How does the universe work? The search for the answers constitutes the Enduring Quests of this roadmap. Building on the priorities identified in New Worlds, New Horizons, we envision future science investigations laid out in three Eras, with each representing roughly ten years of mission development in a given field. The immediate Near-Term Era covers ongoing NASA-led activities and planned missions. This will be followed by the missions of the Formative Era, which will build on the preceding technological developments and scientific discoveries, with remarkable capabilities that will enable breakthroughs across the landscape of astrophysics. These will then lay the foundations for the Daring Visions of the Visionary Era: missions and explorations that will take us deep into unchartered scientific and technological terrain. The roadmap outlined herein will require the vision and wherewithal to undertake highly ambitious programs over the next 30 years. The discoveries that emerge will inspire generations of citizen scientists young and old, and inspire all of humanity for decades to come.
  • The American Physical Society's Division of Particles and Fields initiated a long-term planning exercise over 2012-13, with the goal of developing the community's long term aspirations. The sub-group "Dark Energy and CMB" prepared a series of papers explaining and highlighting the physics that will be studied with large galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background experiments. This paper summarizes the findings of the other papers, all of which have been submitted jointly to the arXiv.
  • The Astro2010 Decadal Survey recommended a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as its top priority for a new large space mission. As conceived by the decadal survey, WFIRST would carry out a dark energy science program, a microlensing program to determine the demographics of exoplanets, and a general observing program utilizing its ultra wide field. In October 2012, NASA chartered a Science Definition Team (SDT) to produce, in collaboration with the WFIRST Project Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL, a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for an implementation of WFIRST using one of the 2.4-m, Hubble-quality mirror assemblies recently made available to NASA. This DRM builds on the work of the earlier WFIRST SDT, reported by Green et al. (2012). The 2.4-m primary mirror enables a mission with greater sensitivity and higher angular resolution than the 1.3-m and 1.1-m designs considered previously, increasing both the science return of the primary surveys and the capabilities of WFIRST as a Guest Observer facility. The option of adding an on-axis, coronagraphic instrument would enable imaging and spectroscopic studies of planets around nearby stars. This document presents the final report of the SDT.
  • The Astro2010 Decadal Survey recommended a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as its top priority for a new large space mission. The report of the WFIRST-AFTA Science Definition Team (SDT) presents a Design Reference Mission for WFIRST that employs one of the 2.4-m, Hubble-quality mirror assemblies recently made available to NASA. The 2.4-m primary mirror enables a mission with greater sensitivity and higher angular resolution than the smaller aperture designs previously considered for WFIRST, increasing both the science return of the primary surveys and the capabilities of WFIRST as a Guest Observer facility. The option of adding an on-axis, coronagraphic instrument would enable imaging and spectroscopic studies of planets around nearby stars. This short article, produced as a companion to the SDT report, summarizes the key points of the WFIRST-2.4 DRM. It highlights the remarkable opportunity that the 2.4-m telescope affords for advances in many fields of astrophysics and cosmology, including dark energy, the demographics and characterization of exoplanets, the evolution of galaxies and quasars, and the stellar populations of the Milky Way and its neighbors.
  • In December 2010, NASA created a Science Definition Team (SDT) for WFIRST, the Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope, recommended by the Astro 2010 Decadal Survey as the highest priority for a large space mission. The SDT was chartered to work with the WFIRST Project Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL to produce a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for WFIRST. Part of the original charge was to produce an interim design reference mission by mid-2011. That document was delivered to NASA and widely circulated within the astronomical community. In late 2011 the Astrophysics Division augmented its original charge, asking for two design reference missions. The first of these, DRM1, was to be a finalized version of the interim DRM, reducing overall mission costs where possible. The second of these, DRM2, was to identify and eliminate capabilities that overlapped with those of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (henceforth JWST), ESA's Euclid mission, and the NSF's ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (henceforth LSST), and again to reduce overall mission cost, while staying faithful to NWNH. This report presents both DRM1 and DRM2.
  • D. Schlegel, F. Abdalla, T. Abraham, C. Ahn, C. Allende Prieto, J. Annis, E. Aubourg, M. Azzaro, S. Bailey. C. Baltay, C. Baugh, C. Bebek, S. Becerril, M. Blanton, A. Bolton, B. Bromley, R. Cahn, P.-H. Carton, J. L. Cervantes-Cota, Y. Chu, M. Cortes, K. Dawson, A. Dey, M. Dickinson, H. T. Diehl, P. Doel, A. Ealet, J. Edelstein, D. Eppelle, S. Escoffier, A. Evrard, L. Faccioli, C. Frenk, M. Geha, D. Gerdes, P. Gondolo, A. Gonzalez-Arroyo, B. Grossan, T. Heckman, H. Heetderks, S. Ho, K. Honscheid, D. Huterer, O. Ilbert, I. Ivans, P. Jelinsky, Y. Jing, D. Joyce, R. Kennedy, S. Kent, D. Kieda, A. Kim, C. Kim, J.-P. Kneib, X. Kong, A. Kosowsky, K. Krishnan, O. Lahav, M. Lampton, S. LeBohec, V. Le Brun, M. Levi, C. Li, M. Liang, H. Lim, W. Lin, E. Linder, W. Lorenzon, A. de la Macorra, Ch. Magneville, R. Malina, C. Marinoni, V. Martinez, S. Majewski, T. Matheson, R. McCloskey, P. McDonald, T. McKay, J. McMahon, B. Menard, J. Miralda-Escude, M. Modjaz, A. Montero-Dorta, I. Morales, N. Mostek, J. Newman, R. Nichol, P. Nugent, K. Olsen, N. Padmanabhan, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, I. Park, J. Peacock, W. Percival, S. Perlmutter, C. Peroux, P. Petitjean, F. Prada, E. Prieto, J. Prochaska, K. Reil, C. Rockosi, N. Roe, E. Rollinde, A. Roodman, N. Ross, G. Rudnick, V. Ruhlmann-Kleider, J. Sanchez, D. Sawyer, C. Schimd, M. Schubnell, R. Scoccimaro, U. Seljak, H. Seo, E. Sheldon, M. Sholl, R. Shulte-Ladbeck, A. Slosar, D. S. Smith, G. Smoot, W. Springer, A. Stril, A. S. Szalay, C. Tao, G. Tarle, E. Taylor, A. Tilquin, J. Tinker, F. Valdes, J. Wang, T. Wang, B. A. Weaver, D. Weinberg, M. White, M. Wood-Vasey, J. Yang, X. Yang. Ch. Yeche, N. Zakamska, A. Zentner, C. Zhai, P. Zhang
    June 9, 2011 astro-ph.IM
    BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (kmax = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (kmax = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.
  • We combine the constraints from the recent Ly-alpha forest and bias analysis of the SDSS with previous constraints from SDSS galaxy clustering, the latest supernovae, and WMAP . Combining WMAP and the lya we find for the primordial slope n_s=0.98\pm 0.02. We see no evidence of running, dn/d\ln k=-0.003\pm 0.010, a factor of 3 improvement over previous constraints. We also find no evidence of tensors, r<0.36 (95% c.l.). A positive correlation between tensors and primordial slope disfavors chaotic inflation type models with steep slopes: V \propto \phi^4 is outside the 3-sigma contour. For the amplitude we find sigma_8=0.90\pm 0.03 from the lyaf and WMAP alone. We find no evidence of neutrino mass: for the case of 3 massive neutrino families with an inflationary prior, \sum m_{\nu}<0.42eV and the mass of lightest neutrino is m_1<0.13eV at 95% c.l. For the 3 massless + 1 massive neutrino case we find m_{\nu}<0.79eV for the massive neutrino, excluding at 95% c.l. all neutrino mass solutions compatible with the LSND results. We explore dark energy constraints in models with a fairly general time dependence of dark energy equation of state, finding Omega_lambda=0.72\pm 0.02, w(z=0.3)=-0.98^{+0.10}_{-0.12}, the latter changing to w(z=0.3)=-0.92^{+0.09}_{-0.10} if tensors are allowed. We find no evidence for variation of the equation of state with redshift, w(z=1)=-1.03^{+0.21}_{-0.28}. These results rely on the current understanding of the lyaf and other probes, which need to be explored further both observationally and theoretically, but extensive tests reveal no evidence of inconsistency among different data sets used here.
  • We measure cosmological parameters using the three-dimensional power spectrum P(k) from over 200,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in combination with WMAP and other data. Our results are consistent with a ``vanilla'' flat adiabatic Lambda-CDM model without tilt (n=1), running tilt, tensor modes or massive neutrinos. Adding SDSS information more than halves the WMAP-only error bars on some parameters, tightening 1 sigma constraints on the Hubble parameter from h~0.74+0.18-0.07 to h~0.70+0.04-0.03, on the matter density from Omega_m~0.25+/-0.10 to Omega_m~0.30+/-0.04 (1 sigma) and on neutrino masses from <11 eV to <0.6 eV (95%). SDSS helps even more when dropping prior assumptions about curvature, neutrinos, tensor modes and the equation of state. Our results are in substantial agreement with the joint analysis of WMAP and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, which is an impressive consistency check with independent redshift survey data and analysis techniques. In this paper, we place particular emphasis on clarifying the physical origin of the constraints, i.e., what we do and do not know when using different data sets and prior assumptions. For instance, dropping the assumption that space is perfectly flat, the WMAP-only constraint on the measured age of the Universe tightens from t0~16.3+2.3-1.8 Gyr to t0~14.1+1.0-0.9 Gyr by adding SDSS and SN Ia data. Including tensors, running tilt, neutrino mass and equation of state in the list of free parameters, many constraints are still quite weak, but future cosmological measurements from SDSS and other sources should allow these to be substantially tightened.
  • This paper discusses a semi-numerical method of investigating the enrichment of the intergalactic medium by galactic winds. We find that most galaxies at z >~ 3 should be driving winds, and that (if these winds are similar to those at low-z) these winds should escape to large distances. Our calculations -- which permit exploration of a large region of model parameter space -- indicate that the wind velocity, the mass of the wind-driving galaxies, the fraction of ambient material entrained, and the available time (between wind launch and the observed redshift) all affect wind propagation significantly; other physical effects can be important but are sub-dominant. We find that under reasonable assumptions, the enrichment by 3 <~ z <~ 6 galaxies could account for the quantity of metals seen in the Ly-alpha forest, though it is presently unclear whether this enrichment is compatible with the intergalactic medium's detailed metal distribution or relative quiescence.
  • We challenge a widely accepted assumption of observational cosmology: that successful reconstruction of observed galaxy density fields from measured galaxy velocity fields (or vice versa), using the methods of gravitational instability theory, implies that the observed large-scale structures and large-scale flows were produced by the action of gravity. This assumption is false, in that there exist non-gravitational theories that pass the reconstruction tests and gravitational theories with certain forms of biased galaxy formation that fail them. Gravitational instability theory predicts specific correlations between large-scale velocity and mass density fields, but the same correlations arise in any model where (a) structures in the galaxy distribution grow from homogeneous initial conditions in a way that satisfies the continuity equation, and (b) the present-day velocity field is irrotational and proportional to the time-averaged velocity field. We demonstrate these assertions using analytical arguments and N-body simulations of gravitational and non-gravitational models. We also show examples of gravitational and non-gravitational models that {\it fail} reconstruction tests because galaxy formation is modulated (``biased'') in a way that violates the continuity equation. We discuss the relation between the value of $\Omega$ inferred from velocity-density comparisons and the true cosmological value.
  • We calculate the cosmological evolution of the 1-point probability distribution function (PDF), using an analytic approximation that combines gravitational perturbation theory with the Edgeworth expansion of the PDF. Our method applies directly to a smoothed mass density field or to the divergence of a smoothed peculiar velocity field, provided that rms fluctuations are small compared to unity on the smoothing scale, and that the primordial fluctuations that seed the growth of structure are Gaussian. We use this `Edgeworth approximation' to compute the evolution of $<\delta|\delta|>$ and $<|delta|>$; these measures are similar to the skewness and kurtosis of the density field, but they are less sensitive to tails of the probability distribution, so they may be more accurately estimated from surveys of limited volume. We compare our analytic calculations to cosmological N-body simulations in order to assess their range of validity. When $\sigma \ll 1$, the numerical simulations and perturbation theory agree precisely, demonstrating that the N-body method can yield accurate results in the regime of weakly non-linear clustering. We show analytically that `biased' galaxy formation preserves the relation $<\delta^3> \propto <\delta^2>^2$ predicted by second-order perturbation theory, provided that the galaxy density is a local function of the underlying mass density.