• We study the surface brightness profiles of disc galaxies in the 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) and K_s-band images from the Near Infrared S0-Sa galaxy Survey (NIRS0S). We particularly connect properties of single exponential (type I), downbending double exponential (type II), and upbending double exponential (type III) disc profile types, to structural components of galaxies by using detailed morphological classifications, and size measurements of rings and lenses. We also study how the local environment of the galaxies affects the profile types by calculating parameters describing the environmental density and the tidal interaction strength. We find that in majority of type II profiles the break radius is connected with structural components such as rings, lenses, and spirals. The exponential disc sections of all three profile types, when considered separately, follow the disc scaling relations. However, the outer discs of type II, and the inner discs of type III, are similar in scalelength to the single exponential discs. Although the different profile types have similar mean environmental parameters, the scalelengths of the type III profiles show a positive correlation with the tidal interaction strength.
  • We study the evolution of spectral early-type galaxies in clusters, groups and the field up to redshift 0.9 using the EDisCS dataset. We measure Re, Ie, and sigma for 154 cluster and 68 field galaxies. We study the evolution of the zero point of the fundamental plane (FP) and confirm results in the literature, but now also for the low cluster velocity dispersion regime. The mass-to-light ratio varies as Delta log M/L_B=(-0.54+-0.01)z=(-1.61+-0.01)log(1+z) in clusters, independent of their velocity dispersion. The evolution is stronger (Delta log M/L_B=(-0.76+-0.01)z=(-2.27+-0.03)log(1+z)) for field galaxies. The FP residuals correlate with galaxy mass and become progressively negative at low masses. The effect is visible at z>=0.7 for cluster galaxies and at z>=0.5 for field galaxies. We investigate the size evolution of our galaxy sample. We find that the half-luminosity radius for a galaxy with a dynamical or stellar mass of 2x10^11 Msol varies as (1+z)^{-1.0+-0.3} for both cluster and field galaxies. At the same time, stellar velocity dispersions grow with redshift, as (1+z)^{0.59+-0.10} at constant dynamical mass, and as (1+z)^{0.34+- 0.14} at constant stellar mass. The measured size evolution reduces to Re (1+z)^{-0.5+- 0.2} and sigma (1+z)^{0.41+-0.08}, at fixed dynamical masses, and Re (1+z)^{-0.68+-0.4} and sigma (1+z)^{0.19+-0.10}, at fixed stellar masses, when the progenitor bias (galaxies that locally are of spectroscopic early-type, but not very old, disappear from the EDisCS high-redshift sample; these galaxies tend to be large in size) is taken into account. Taken together, the variations in size and velocity dispersion imply that the luminosity evolution with redshift derived from the zero point of the FP is somewhat milder than that derived without taking these variations into account.
  • We present and describe the astro-photometric catalog of more than 800,000 sources found in the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). HTTP is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury program designed to image the entire 30 Doradus region down to the sub-solar (~0.5 solar masses) mass regime using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). We observed 30 Doradus in the near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F555W, F658N, F775W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) wavelengths. The stellar photometry was measured using point-spread function (PSF) fitting across all the bands simultaneously. The relative astrometric accuracy of the catalog is 0.4 mas. The astro-photometric catalog, results from artificial star experiments and the mosaics for all the filters are available for download. Color-magnitude diagrams are presented showing the spatial distributions and ages of stars within 30 Dor as well as in the surrounding fields. HTTP provides the first rich and statistically significant sample of intermediate and low mass pre-main sequence candidates and allows us to trace how star formation has been developing through the region. The depth and high spatial resolution of our analysis highlight the dual role of stellar feedback in quenching and triggering star formation on the giant HII region scale. Our results are consistent with stellar sub-clustering in a partially filled gaseous nebula that is offset towards our side of the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • The mid-infrared is an optimal window to trace stellar mass in nearby galaxies and the 3.6$\mu m$ IRAC band has been exploited to this effect, but such mass estimates can be biased by dust emission. We present our pipeline to reveal the old stellar flux at 3.6$\mu m$ and obtain stellar mass maps for more than 1600 galaxies available from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S$^{4}$G). This survey consists of images in two infrared bands (3.6 and 4.5$\mu m$), and we use the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) method presented in Meidt et al. (2012) to separate the dominant light from old stars and the dust emission that can significantly contribute to the observed 3.6$\mu m$ flux. We exclude from our ICA analysis galaxies with low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N < 10) and those with original [3.6]-[4.5] colors compatible with an old stellar population, indicative of little dust emission (mostly early Hubble types, which can directly provide good mass maps). For the remaining 1251 galaxies to which ICA was successfully applied, we find that as much as 10-30% of the total light at 3.6$\mu m$ typically originates from dust, and locally it can reach even higher values. This contamination fraction shows a correlation with specific star formation rates, confirming that the dust emission that we detect is related to star formation. Additionally, we have used our large sample of mass estimates to calibrate a relationship of effective mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) as a function of observed [3.6]-[4.5] color: $\log(M/L)=-0.339 (\pm 0.057) \times ([3.6]-[4.5]) -0.336 (\pm 0.002)$. Our final pipeline products have been made public through IRSA, providing the astronomical community with an unprecedentedly large set of stellar mass maps ready to use for scientific applications.
  • We identify some of the most HI massive and fastest rotating disk galaxies in the local universe with the aim of probing the processes that drive the formation of these extreme disk galaxies. By combining data from the Cosmic Flows project, which has consistently reanalyzed archival galaxy HI profiles, and 3.6$\mu$m photometry obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, with which we can measure stellar mass, we use the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relationship to explore whether these massive galaxies are distinct. We discuss several results, but the most striking is the systematic offset of the HI-massive sample above the BTF. These galaxies have both more gas and more stars in their disks than the typical disk galaxy of similar rotational velocity. The "condensed" baryon fraction, $f_C$, the fraction of the baryons in a dark matter halo that settle either as cold gas or stars into the disk, is twice as high in the HI-massive sample than typical, and almost reaches the universal baryon fraction in some cases, suggesting that the most extreme of these galaxies have little in the way of a hot baryonic component or cold baryons distributed well outside the disk. In contrast, the star formation efficiency, measured as the ratio of the mass in stars to that in both stars and gas, shows no difference between the HI-massive sample and the typical disk galaxies. We conclude that the star formation efficiency is driven by an internal, self-regulating process, while $f_C$ is affected by external factors. We also found that the most massive HI detected galaxies are located preferentially in filaments. We present the first evidence of an environmental effect on galaxy evolution using a dynamical definition of a filament.
  • The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S4G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs (1959) morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S4G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of "stellar structures" seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.
  • We present Spitzer/IRAC observations of nine $z'$-band dropouts highly magnified (2<mu<12) by the Bullet Cluster. We combine archival imaging with our Exploratory program (SURFS UP), which results in a total integration time of ~30 hr per IRAC band. We detect (>3sigma) in both IRAC bands the brightest of these high-redshift galaxies, with [3.6]=23.80+-0.28 mag, [4.5]=23.78+-0.25 mag, and (H-[3.6])=1.17+-0.32 mag. The remaining eight galaxies are undetected to [3.6]~26.4 mag and [4.5]~26.0 mag with stellar masses of ~5x10^7 M_sol. The detected galaxy has an estimated magnification of mu=12+-4, which implies this galaxy has an ultraviolet luminosity of L_1500~0.3 L*_{z=7} --- the lowest luminosity individual source detected in IRAC at z>7. By modeling the broadband photometry, we estimate the galaxy has an intrinsic star-formation rate of SFR~1.3 M_sol/yr and stellar mass of M~2x10^9 M_sol, which gives a specific star-formation rate of sSFR~0.7 Gyr^-1. If this galaxy had sustained this star-formation rate since z~20, it could have formed the observed stellar mass (to within a factor of ~2), we also discuss alternate star-formation histories and argue the exponentially-increasing model is unlikely. Finally, based on the intrinsic star-formation rate, we estimate this galaxy has a likely [C II] flux of <f_[C II]> = 10^{-17} erg/s/cm2.
  • Constraints on the mass distribution in high-redshift clusters of galaxies are not currently very strong. We aim to constrain the mass profile, M(r), and dynamical status of the $z \sim 0.8$ LCDCS 0504 cluster of galaxies characterized by prominent giant gravitational arcs near its center. Our analysis is based on deep X-ray, optical, and infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopy. We model the mass distribution of the cluster with three different mass density profiles, whose parameters are constrained by the strong lensing features of the inner cluster region, by the X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium, and by the kinematics of 71 cluster members. We obtain consistent M(r) determinations from three methods (dispersion-kurtosis, caustics and MAMPOSSt), out to the cluster virial radius and beyond. The mass profile inferred by the strong lensing analysis in the central cluster region is slightly above, but still consistent with, the kinematics estimate. On the other hand, the X-ray based M(r) is significantly below both the kinematics and strong lensing estimates. Theoretical predictions from $\Lambda$CDM cosmology for the concentration--mass relation are in agreement with our observational results, when taking into account the uncertainties in both the observational and theoretical estimates. There appears to be a central deficit in the intra-cluster gas mass fraction compared to nearby clusters. Despite the relaxed appearance of this cluster, the determinations of its mass profile by different probes show substantial discrepancies, the origin of which remains to be determined. The extension of a similar dynamical analysis to other clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey will allow to shed light on the possible systematics that affect the determination of mass profiles of high-z clusters, possibly related to our incomplete understanding of intracluster baryon physics.
  • We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in September 2012 until November 2013. This data was collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous CSM produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow H-alpha flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of H-alpha persists with SN-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN Impostor events. At late times we find that SN 2009ip continues to decline slowly, at <0.01 magnitudes per day, with small fluctuations in slope similar to Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) or SN impostors, but no further LBV-like activity. The late time spectrum features broad calcium lines similar to both late time SNe and SN Impostors. In general, we find that the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009ip is more similar to SNe IIn than either continued eruptions of an LBV star or SN Impostors. In this context, we discuss the implications for episodic mass loss during the late stages of massive star evolution.
  • We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift. The percentage of mass included in substructures was found to be roughly constant with redshift with values of 5-15%, in agreement both with the general CDM framework and with the results of numerical simulations. Galaxies in substructures show the same general behaviour as regular cluster galaxies; however, in substructures, there is a deficiency of both late type and old stellar population galaxies. Late type galaxies with recent bursts of star formation seem to be missing in the substructures close to the bottom of the host cluster potential well. However, our sample would need to be increased to allow a more robust analysis.
  • The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) is an ongoing panchromatic imaging survey of stellar populations in the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud that reaches into the sub-solar mass regime (< 0.5 Mo). HTTP utilizes the capability of HST to operate the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in parallel to study this remarkable region in the near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared spectral regions, including narrow band H$\alpha$ images. The combination of all these bands provides a unique multi-band view. The resulting maps of the stellar content of the Tarantula Nebula within its main body provide the basis for investigations of star formation in an environment resembling the extreme conditions found in starburst galaxies and in the early Universe. Access to detailed properties of individual stars allows us to begin to reconstruct the evolution of the stellar skeleton of the Tarantula Nebula over space and time with parcsec-scale resolution. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products from this survey and present preliminary results obtained from the analysis of the initial set of near-infrared observations.
  • We present deep wide-field photometry of three recently discovered faint Milky Way satellites: Leo V, Pisces II, and Canes Venatici II. Our main goals are to study the structure and star formation history of these dwarfs; we also search for signs of tidal disturbance. The three satellites have similar half-light radii ($\sim 60-90$ pc) but a wide range of ellipticities. Both Leo V and CVn II show hints of stream-like overdensities at large radii. An analysis of the satellite color-magnitude diagrams shows that all three objects are old ($>$ 10 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] $\sim -2$), though neither the models nor the data have sufficient precision to assess when the satellites formed with respect to cosmic reionization. The lack of an observed younger stellar population ($\la 10$ Gyr) possibly sets them apart from the other satellites at Galactocentric distances $\ga 150$ kpc. We present a new compilation of structural data for all Milky Way satellite galaxies and use it to compare the properties of classical dwarfs to the ultra-faints. The ellipticity distribution of the two groups is consistent at the $\sim$2-$\sigma$ level. However, the faintest satellites tend to be more aligned toward the Galactic center, and those satellites with the highest ellipticity ($\ga 0.4$) have orientations ($\Delta \theta_{GC}$) in the range $20^{\circ} \lesssim \Delta \theta_{GC} \lesssim 40^{\circ}$. This latter observation is in rough agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf galaxies that have lost a significant fraction of their dark matter halos and are being tidally stripped.
  • We analyze deep g' and r' band data of 97 galaxy clusters imaged with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope. We compute the number of luminous (giant) and faint (dwarf) galaxies using criteria based on the definitions of de Lucia et al. (2007). Due to excellent image quality and uniformity of the data and analysis, we probe the giant-to-dwarf ratio (GDR) out to z ~ 0.55. With X-ray temperature (Tx) information for the majority of our clusters, we constrain, for the first time, the Tx-corrected giant and dwarf evolution separately. Our measurements support an evolving GDR over the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.55. We show that modifying the (g'-r'), m_r' and K-correction used to define dwarf and giant selection do not alter the conclusion regarding the presence of evolution. We parameterize the GDR evolution using a linear function of redshift (GDR = alpha * z + beta) with a best fit slope of alpha = 0.88 +/- 0.15 and normalization beta = 0.44 +/- 0.03. Contrary to claims of a large intrinsic scatter, we find that the GDR data can be fully accounted for using observational errors alone. Consistently, we find no evidence for a correlation between GDR and cluster mass (via Tx or weak lensing). Lastly, the data suggest that the evolution of the GDR at z < 0.2 is driven primarily by dry merging of the massive giant galaxies, which when considered with previous results at higher redshift, suggests a change in the dominant mechanism that mediates the GDR.
  • We present 7 spectroscopically confirmed Type II cluster supernovae (SNeII) discovered in the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey, a supernova survey targeting 57 low redshift 0.05 < z < 0.15 galaxy clusters with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find the rate of Type II supernovae within the virial radius of these galaxy clusters to be 0.026 (+0.085 -0.018 stat; +0.003 -0.001 sys) SNe per century per 1e10 solar masses. Surprisingly, one SNII is in a red sequence host galaxy that shows no clear evidence of recent star formation. This is unambiguous evidence in support of ongoing, low-level star formation in at least some cluster elliptical galaxies, and illustrates that galaxies that appear to be quiescent cannot be assumed to host only Type Ia SNe. Based on this single SNII we make the first measurement of the SNII rate in red sequence galaxies, and find it to be 0.007 (+0.014 -0.007 stat; +0.009 -0.001 sys) SNe per century per 1e10 solar masses. We also make the first derivation of cluster specific star formation rates (sSFR) from cluster SNII rates. We find that for all galaxy types, sSFR is 5.1 (+15.8 -3.1 stat; +0.9 -0.9 sys) solar masses per year per 1e12 solar masses, and for red sequence galaxies only, it is 2.0 (+4.2 -0.9 stat; +0.4 -0.4 sys) solar masses per year per 1e12 solar masses. These values agree with SFRs measured from infrared and ultraviolet photometry, and H-alpha emission from optical spectroscopy. Additionally, we use the SFR derived from our SNII rate to show that although a small fraction of cluster Type Ia SNe may originate in the young stellar population and experience a short delay time, these results do not preclude the use of cluster SNIa rates to derive the late-time delay time distribution for SNeIa.
  • We detect ionized gas characteristics indicative of winds in three disk-dominated galaxies that are members of a super-group at z=0.37 that will merge to form a Coma-mass cluster. All three galaxies are IR-luminous (L_IR > 4 x 10^{10} L_sun, SFR >8 M_sun per year) and lie outside the X-ray cores of the galaxy groups. We find that the most IR-luminous galaxy has strong blue and redshifted emission lines with velocities of ~ +/-200 km/s and a third, blueshifted (~ 900 km/s) component. This galaxy's line-widths (Hb, [OIII]5007, [NII], Ha) correspond to velocities of 100-1000 km/s. We detect extraplanar gas in two of three galaxies with SFR > 8 M_sun per year whose orientations are approximately edge-on and which have IFU spaxels off the stellar disk. IFU maps reveal that the extraplanar gas extends to r_h ~ 10 kpc; [NII] and Ha line-widths correspond to velocities of ~200-400 km/s in the disk and decrease to ~50-150 km/s above the disk. Multi-wavelength observations indicate that the emission is dominated by star formation. Including the most IR-luminous galaxy we find that 18% of supergroup members with SFR > 8 M_sun per year show ionized gas characteristics indicative of outflows. This is a lower limit as showing that gas is outflowing in the remaining, moderately inclined, galaxies requires a non-trivial decoupling of contributions to the emission lines from rotational and turbulent motion. Ionized gas mass loss in these winds is ~0.1 M_sun per year for each galaxy, although the winds are likely to entrain significantly larger amounts of mass in neutral and molecular gas.
  • The Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey (MENeaCS) has discovered twenty-three cluster Type Ia supernovae (SNe) in the 58 X-ray selected galaxy clusters (0.05 < z < 0.15) surveyed. Four of our SN Ia events have no host galaxy on close inspection, and are likely intracluster SNe. Deep image stacks at the location of the candidate intracluster SNe put upper limits on the luminosities of faint hosts, with M_{r} > -13.0 mag and M_{g} > -12.5 mag in all cases. For such limits, the fraction of the cluster luminosity in faint dwarfs below our detection limit is <0.1%, assuming a standard cluster luminosity function. All four events occurred within ~600 kpc of the cluster center (projected), as defined by the position of the brightest cluster galaxy, and are more centrally concentrated than the cluster SN Ia population as a whole. After accounting for several observational biases that make intracluster SNe easier to discover and spectroscopically confirm, we calculate an intracluster stellar mass fraction of 0.16^{+0.13}_{-0.09} (68% CL) for all objects within R_{200}. If we assume that the intracluster stellar population is exclusively old, and the cluster galaxies themselves have a mix of stellar ages, we derive an upper limit on the intracluster stellar mass fraction of <0.47 (84% one-sided CL). When combined with the intragroup SNe results of McGee & Balogh, we confirm the declining intracluster stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass reported by Gonzalez and collaborators. (Abridged)
  • The study of intracluster light can help us to understand the mechanisms taking place in galaxy clusters, and to place constraints on the cluster formation history and physical properties. However, owing to the intrinsic faintness of ICL emission, most searches and detailed studies of ICL have been limited to redshifts z<0.4.We search for ICL in a subsample of ten clusters detected by the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS), at redshifts 0.4<z<0.8, that are also part of our DAFT/FADA Survey. We analyze the ICL by applying the OV WAV package, a wavelet-based technique, to deep HST ACS images in the F814W filter and to V-band VLT/FORS2 images of three clusters. Detection levels are assessed as a function of the diffuse light source surface brightness using simulations. In the F814W filter images, we detect diffuse light sources in all the clusters, with typical sizes of a few tens of kpc (assuming that they are at the cluster redshifts). The ICL detected by stacking the ten F814W images shows an 8sigma detection in the source center extending over a ~50x50kpc2 area, with a total absolute magnitude of -21.6 in the F814W filter, equivalent to about two L* galaxies per cluster. We find a weak correlation between the total F814W absolute magnitude of the ICL and the cluster velocity dispersion and mass. There is no apparent correlation between the cluster mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and the amount of ICL, and no evidence for any preferential orientation in the ICL source distribution. We find no strong variation in the amount of ICL between z=0 and z=0.8. In addition, we find wavelet-detected compact objects (WDCOs) in the three clusters for which data in two bands are available; these objects are probably very faint compact galaxies that in some cases are members of the respective clusters. We have shown that ICL is important in clusters at least up to z=0.8.
  • We present MMT/Megacam imaging of the Leo~IV dwarf galaxy in order to investigate its structure and star formation history, and to search for signs of association with the recently discovered Leo~V satellite. Based on parameterized fits, we find that Leo~IV is round, with $\epsilon < 0.23$ (at the 68\% confidence limit) and a half-light radius of $r_{h} \simeq 130$ pc. Additionally, we perform a thorough search for extended structures in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight. We derive our surface brightness detection limit by implanting fake structures into our catalog with stellar populations identical to that of Leo~IV. We show that we are sensitive to stream-like structures with surface brightness $\mu_{r}\lesssim29.6$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, and at this limit, we find no stellar bridge between Leo IV (out to a radius of $\sim$0.5 kpc) and the recently discovered, nearby satellite Leo V. Using the color magnitude fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Leo~IV is consistent with a single age ($\sim$14 Gyr), single metallicity ($[Fe/H]\sim-2.3$) stellar population, although we can not rule out a significant spread in these value. We derive a luminosity of $M_{V}=-5.5\pm0.3$. Studying both the spatial distribution and frequency of Leo~IV's 'blue plume' stars reveals evidence for a young ($\sim$2 Gyr) stellar population which makes up $\sim$2\% of its stellar mass. This sprinkling of star formation, only detectable in this deep study, highlights the need for further imaging of the new Milky Way satellites along with theoretical work on the expected, detailed properties of these possible 'reionization fossils'.
  • This paper reports the results obtained on the photometric redshifts measurement and accuracy, and cluster tomography in the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) fields. Photometric redshifts were computed using two independent codes (Hyperz and G. Rudnick's code). The accuracy of photometric redshifts was assessed by comparing our estimates with the spectroscopic redshifts of ~1400 galaxies in the 0.3<z<1.0 domain. The accuracy for galaxies fainter than the spectroscopic control sample was estimated using a degraded version of the photometric catalog for the spectroscopic sample. The accuracy of photometric redshifts is typically sigma(Delta z/(1+z)) ~ 0.05+/-0.01, depending on the field, the filter set, and the spectral type of the galaxies. The quality of the photometric redshifts degrades by a factor of two in sigma(Delta z/(1+z)) between the brightest (I~22) and the faintest (I~24-24.5) galaxies in the EDisCS sample. The photometric determination of cluster redshifts in the EDisCS fields using a simple algorithm based on photoz is in excellent agreement with the spectroscopic values (delta(z) ~0.03-0.04 in the high-z sample and ~0.05 in the low-z sample). We also developed a method that uses both photz codes jointly to reject interlopers at magnitudes fainter than the spectroscopic limit. When applied to the spectroscopic sample, this method rejects ~50-90% of all spectroscopically confirmed non-members, while retaining at least 90% of all confirmed members. Photometric redshifts are found to be particularly useful for the identification and study of clusters of galaxies in large surveys. They enable efficient and complete pre-selection of cluster members for spectroscopy, allow accurate determinations of the cluster redshifts, and provide a means of determining cluster membership. (Abridged)
  • We present imaging of the recently discovered Hercules Milky Way satellite and its surrounding regions to study its structure, star formation history and to thoroughly search for signs of disruption. We robustly determine the distance, luminosity, size and morphology of Hercules utilizing a bootstrap approach to characterize our uncertainties. We derive a distance to Hercules of $133 \pm 6$ kpc via a comparison to empirical and theoretical isochrones. As previous studies have found, Hercules is very elongated, with $\epsilon=0.67\pm0.03$ and a half light radius of $r_{h} \simeq 230$ pc. Using the color magnitude fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Hercules is old ($>12$ Gyr) and metal poor ($[Fe/H]\sim-2.0$), with a spread in metallicity, in agreement with previous spectroscopic work. We infer a total absolute magnitude of $M_V=-5.3\pm0.4$. Our innovative search for external Hercules structure both in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight yields some evidence that Hercules is embedded in a larger stream of stars. A clear stellar extension is seen to the Northwest with several additional candidate stellar overdensities along the position angle of Hercules out to $\sim$35' ($\sim$1.3 kpc). While the association of any of the individual stellar overdensities with Hercules is difficult to determine, we do show that the summed color magnitude diagram of all three is consistent with Hercules' stellar population. Finally, we estimate that any change in the distance to Hercules across its face is at most $\sim$6 kpc; and the data are consistent with Hercules being at the same distance throughout.
  • We use deep (~27.5 mag V-band point-source limiting magnitude) V- and U-band LBT imaging to study the outer disk (beyond the optical radius R_25) of the non-interacting, face-on spiral galaxy NGC 3184 (D = 11.1 Mpc; R_25 = 11.1 kpc) and find that this outer disk contains >1000 objects (or marginally-resolved 'knots') resembling star clusters with masses ~10^2 - 10^4 M_sun and ages up to ~1 Gyr. We find statistically significant numbers of these cluster-like knots extending to ~1.4 R_25, with the redder knots outnumbering bluer at the largest radii. We measure clustering among knots and find significant correlation to galactocentric radii of 1.5 R_25 for knot separations <1 kpc. The effective integrated surface brightness of this outer disk cluster population ranges from 30 - 32 mag arcsec^-2 in V. We compare the HI extent to that of the correlated knots and find that the clusters extend at least to the damped Lyman-alpha threshold of HI column density (2e20 cm^-2; 1.62 R_25). The blue knots are correlated with HI spiral structure to 1.5 R_25, while the red knots may be correlated with the outer fringes of the HI disk to 1.7 R_25. These results suggest that outer disks are well-populated, common, and long-lasting features of many nearby disk galaxies.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the stellar population properties (age, metallicity and the alpha-element enhancement [E/Fe]) and morphologies of red-sequence galaxies in 24 clusters and groups from z~0.75 to z~0.45. The dataset, consisting of 215 spectra drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey, constitutes the largest spectroscopic sample at these redshifts for which such an analysis has been conducted. Analysis reveals that the evolution of the stellar population properties of red-sequence galaxies depend on their mass: while the properties of most massive are well described by passive evolution and high-redshift formation, the less massive galaxies require a more extended star formation history. We show that these scenarios reproduce the index-sigma relations as well as the galaxy colours. The two main results of this work are (1) the evolution of the line-strength indices for the red-sequence galaxies can be reproduced if 40% of the galaxies with sigma < 175 km/s entered the red-sequence between z=0.75 to z=0.45, in agreement with the fraction derived in studies of the luminosity functions, and (2) the percentage the red-sequence galaxies exhibiting early-type morphologies (E and S0) decreases by 20% from z=0.75 to z=0.45. This can be understood if the red-sequence gets populated at later times with disc galaxies whose star formation has been quenched. We conclude that the processes quenching star formation do not necessarily produce a simultaneous morphological transformation of the galaxies entering the red-sequence.
  • We present deep, wide-field g and r photometry of the transition type dwarf galaxy Leo T, obtained with the blue arm of the Large Binocular Telescope. The data confirm the presence of both very young (<1 Gyr) as well as much older (>5 Gyr) stars. We study the structural properties of the old and young stellar populations by preferentially selecting either population based on their color and magnitude. The young population is significantly more concentrated than the old population, with half-light radii of 104+-8 and 148+-16 pc respectively, and their centers are slightly offset. Approximately 10% of the total stellar mass is estimated to be represented by the young stellar population. Comparison of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with theoretical isochrones as well as numerical CMD-fitting suggest that star formation began over 10 Gyr ago and continued in recent times until at least a few hundred Myr ago. The CMD-fitting results are indicative of two distinct star formation bursts, with a quiescent period around 3 Gyr ago, albeit at low significance. The results are consistent with no metallicity evolution and [Fe/H] ~ -1.5 over the entire age of the system. Finally, the data show little if any sign of tidal distortion of Leo T.
  • We have begun a program to search for supernovae and other transients in the fields of galaxy clusters with the 2.3m Bok Telescope on Kitt Peak. We present our automated photometric methods for data reduction, efficiency characterization, and initial spectroscopy. With this program, we aim to ultimately identify $\sim$25-35 cluster SN Ia ($\sim$10 of which will be intracluster, hostless events) and constrain the SN Ia rate associated with old, passive stellar populations. With these measurements we will constrain the relative contribution of hostless and hosted SN Ia to the metal enrichment of the intracluster medium. In the current work, we have identified a central excess of transient events within $1.25 r_{200}$ in our cluster fields after statistically subtracting out the 'background' transient rate taken from an off-cluster CCD chip. Based on the published rate of SN Ia for cluster populations we estimate that $\sim$20 percent of the excess cluster transients are due to cluster SN Ia, a comparable fraction to core collapse (CC) supernovae and the remaining are likely to be active galactic nuclei. Interestingly, we have identified three intracluster SN candidates, all of which lay beyond $R>r_{200}$. These events, if truly associated with the cluster, indicate a large deficit of intracluster (IC) SN at smaller radii, and may be associated with the IC stars of infalling groups or indicate that the intracluster light (ICL) in the cluster outskirts is actively forming stars which contribute CC SN or prompt SN Ia.
  • We describe Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of 10 of the 20 ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) fields. Each ~40 square arcminute field was imaged in the F814W filter with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Camera. Based on these data, we present visual morphological classifications for the ~920 sources per field that are brighter than I_auto=23 mag. We use these classifications to quantify the morphological content of 10 intermediate-redshift (0.5 < z < 0.8) galaxy clusters within the HST survey region. The EDisCS results, combined with previously published data from seven higher redshift clusters, show no statistically significant evidence for evolution in the mean fractions of elliptical, S0, and late-type (Sp+Irr) galaxies in clusters over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.2. In contrast, existing studies of lower redshift clusters have revealed a factor of ~2 increase in the typical S0 fraction between z=0.4 and z=0, accompanied by a commensurate decrease in the Sp+Irr fraction and no evolution in the elliptical fraction. The EDisCS clusters demonstrate that cluster morphological fractions plateau beyond z ~ 0.4. They also exhibit a mild correlation between morphological content and cluster velocity dispersion, highlighting the importance of careful sample selection in evaluating evolution. We discuss these findings in the context of a recently proposed scenario in which the fractions of passive (E,S0) and star-forming (Sp,Irr) galaxies are determined primarily by the growth history of clusters.