• Optical solitons-stable waves balancing delicately between nonlinearities and dispersive effects-have advanced the field of ultrafast optics and dynamics, with contributions spanning supercontinuum generation and soliton fission, to optical event horizon, Hawking radiation, and optical rogue waves, amongst others. Here we investigate picojoule soliton dynamics in silicon slow-light photonic-bandgap waveguides under the influence of Drude-modeled free-carrier induced nonlinear effects. Using real-time and single shot amplified dispersive Fourier transform spectroscopy simultaneously with high-fidelity cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating at femtojoule sensitivity and femtosecond resolution, we examine the soliton stability limits, the soliton dynamics including free-carrier quartic slow-light scaling and acceleration, and the Drude electron-hole-plasma induced perturbations on Cherenkov radiation and modulation instability. Our real-time single shot and time-averaged cross-correlation measurements are matched with our detailed theoretical modeling, examining the reduced group velocity free-carrier kinetics on solitons at picojoule.
  • Optical frequency comb (OFC) technology has been the cornerstone for scientific breakthroughs such as precision frequency metrology, redefinition of time, extreme light-matter interaction, and attosecond sciences. While the current mode-locked laser-based OFC has had great success in extending the scientific frontier, its use in real-world applications beyond the laboratory setting remains an unsolved challenge. Microresonator-based OFCs, or Kerr frequency comb, have recently emerged as a candidate solution to the challenge because of their preferable size, weight, and power consumption (SWaP). On the other hand, the current phase stabilization technology requires either external optical references or power-demanding nonlinear processes, overturning the SWaP benefit of Kerr frequency combs. Introducing a new concept in phase control, here we report an internally phase stabilized Kerr frequency comb without the need of any optical references or nonlinear processes. We describe the comb generation analytically with the theory of cavity induced modulation instability, and demonstrate for the first time that the optical frequency can be stabilized by control of two internally accessible parameters: an intrinsic comb offset and the comb spacing. Both parameters are phase locked to microwave references, with 55 mrad and 20 mrad residual phase noises, and the resulting comb-to-comb frequency uncertainty is 0.08 Hz or less. Out-of-loop measurements confirm good coherence and stability across the comb, with measured optical frequency fractional instabilities of 5x10^-11/sqrt(t). The new phase stabilization method preserves the Kerr frequency comb's key advantages and potential for chip-scale electronic and photonic integration.
  • High-Q microresonator has been suggested a promising platform for optical frequency comb generation, via dissipative soliton formation. To achieve a higher Q and obtain the necessary anomalous dispersion, $Si_3N_4$ microresonators made of multi-mode waveguides were previously implemented. However, coupling between different transverse mode families in the multi-mode waveguides results in periodic disruption of dispersion and quality factor, introducing perturbation to dissipative soliton formation and amplitude modulation to the corresponding spectrum. Careful choice of pump wavelength to avoid the mode crossing region is thus critical in conventional $Si_3N_4$ microresonators. Here, we report a novel design of $Si_3N_4$ microresonator such that single mode operation, high quality factor, and anomalous dispersion are attained simultaneously. The microresonator is consisted of uniform single mode waveguides in the semi-circle region, to eliminate bending induced mode coupling, and adiabatically tapered waveguides in the straight region, to avoid excitation of higher order modes. The intrinsic Q of the microresonator reaches $1.36 \times 10^6$ while the GVD remains to be anomalous at $-50 fs^2/mm$. We demonstrate, with this novel microresonator, broadband phase-locked Kerr frequency combs with flat and smooth spectra can be generated by pumping at any resonances in the optical C-band.
  • Optical frequency combs, coherent light sources that connect optical frequencies with microwave oscillations, have become the enabling tool for precision spectroscopy, optical clockwork and attosecond physics over the past decades. Current benchmark systems are self-referenced femtosecond mode-locked lasers, but four-wave-mixing in high-Q resonators have emerged as alternative platforms. Here we report the generation and full stabilization of CMOS-compatible optical frequency combs. The spiral microcomb's two degrees-of-freedom, one of the comb line and the native 18 GHz comb spacing, are first simultaneously phase-locked to known optical and microwave references. Second, with pump power control, active comb spacing stabilization improves the long-term stability by six orders-of-magnitude, reaching an instrument-limited 3.6 mHz/sqrt(t) residual instability. Third, referencing thirty-three of the nitride frequency comb lines against a fiber comb, we demonstrate the comb tooth-to-tooth frequency relative inaccuracy down to 53 mHz and 2.8x10-16, heralding unprecedented chip-scale applications in precision spectroscopy, coherent communications, and astronomical spectrography.
  • Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that simultaneously provide pristine frequency spacings for precision metrology and the fundamental basis for ultrafast and attosecond sciences. Recently, nonlinear parametric conversion in high-Q microresonators has been suggested as an alternative platform for optical frequency combs, though almost all in 100 GHz frequencies or more. Here we report a low-phase-noise on-chip Kerr frequency comb with mode spacing compatible with high-speed silicon optoelectronics. The waveguide cross-section of the silicon nitride spiral resonator is designed to possess small and flattened group velocity dispersion, so that the Kerr frequency comb contains a record-high number of 3,600 phase-locked comb lines. We study the single-sideband phase noise as well as the long-term frequency stability and report the lowest phase noise floor achieved to date with -130 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset for the 18 GHz Kerr comb oscillator, along with feedback stabilization to achieve frequency Allan deviations of 7x10-11 in 1 s. The reported system is a promising compact platform for achieving self-referenced Kerr frequency combs and also for high-capacity coherent communication architectures.
  • We describe the generation of stable mode-locked pulse trains from on-chip normal dispersion microresonators. The excitation of hyper-parametric oscillation is facilitated by the local dispersion disruptions induced by mode interactions. The system is then driven from hyper-parametric oscillation to the mode-locked state with over 200 nm spectral width by controlled pump power and detuning. With the continuous-wave driven nonlinearity, the pulses sit on a pedestal, akin to a cavity soliton. We identify the importance of pump detuning and wavelength-dependent quality factors in stabilizing and shaping the pulse structure, to achieve a single pulse inside the cavity. We examine the mode locking dynamics by numerically solving the master equation and provide analytic solutions under appropriate approximations.
  • High-quality frequency references are the cornerstones in position, navigation and timing applications of both scientific and commercial domains. Optomechanical oscillators, with direct coupling to continuous-wave light and non-material-limited f Q product, are long regarded as a potential platform for frequency reference in radio-frequency-photonic architectures. However, one major challenge is the compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication processes while maintaining optomechanical high quality performance. Here we demonstrate the monolithic integration of photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators and on-chip high speed Ge detectors based on the silicon CMOS platform. With the generation of both high harmonics (up to 59th order) and subharmonics (down to 1/4), our chipset provides multiple frequency tones for applications in both frequency multipliers and dividers. The phase noise is measured down to -125 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at ~ 400 {\mu}W dropped-in powers, one of the lowest noise optomechanical oscillators to date and in room-temperature and atmospheric non-vacuum operating conditions. These characteristics enable optomechanical oscillators as a frequency reference platform for radio-frequency-photonic information processing.