• The spectral distribution $f(\omega)$ of a stationary time series $\{Y_t\}_{t\in\mathbb{Z}}$ can be used to investigate whether or not periodic structures are present in $\{Y_t\}_{t\in\mathbb{Z}}$, but $f(\omega)$ has some limitations due to its dependence on the autocovariances $\gamma(h)$. For example, $f(\omega)$ can not distinguish white i.i.d. noise from GARCH-type models (whose terms are dependent, but uncorrelated), which implies that $f(\omega)$ can be an inadequate tool when $\{Y_t\}_{t\in\mathbb{Z}}$ contains asymmetries and nonlinear dependencies. Asymmetries between the upper and lower tails of a time series can be investigated by means of the local Gaussian autocorrelations $\gamma_{v}(h)$ introduced in Tj{\o}stheim and Hufthammer (2013), and these local measures of dependence can be used to construct the local Gaussian spectral density $f_{v}(\omega)$ that is presented in this paper. A key feature of $f_{v}(\omega)$ is that it coincides with $f(\omega)$ for Gaussian time series, which implies that $f_{v}(\omega)$ can be used to detect non-Gaussian traits in the time series under investigation. In particular, if $f(\omega)$ is flat, then peaks and troughs of $f_{v}(\omega)$ can indicate nonlinear traits, which potentially might discover local periodic phenomena that goes undetected in an ordinary spectral analysis.
  • Spectrum analysis can detect frequency related structures in a time series $\{Y_t\}_{t\in\mathbb{Z}}$, but may in general be an inadequate tool if asymmetries or other nonlinear phenomena are present. This limitation is a consequence of the way the spectrum is based on the second order moments (auto and cross-covariances), and alternative approaches to spectrum analysis have thus been investigated based on other measures of dependence. One such approach was developed for univariate time series in Jordanger and Tj{\o}stheim (2017), where it was seen that a local Gaussian auto-spectrum $f_{v}(\omega)$, based on the local Gaussian autocorrelations $\rho_v(\omega)$ from Tj{\o}stheim and Hufthammer (2013), could detect local structures in time series that looked like white noise when investigated by the ordinary auto-spectrum $f(\omega)$. The local Gaussian approach in this paper is extended to a local Gaussian cross-spectrum $f_{kl:v}(\omega)$ for multivariate time series. The local cross-spectrum $f_{kl:v}(\omega)$ has the desirable property that it coincides with the ordinary cross-spectrum $f_{kl}(\omega)$ for Gaussian time series, which implies that $f_{kl:v}(\omega)$ can be used to detect non-Gaussian traits in the time series under investigation. In particular: If the ordinary spectrum is flat, then peaks and troughs of the local Gaussian spectrum can indicate nonlinear traits, which potentially might discover local periodic phenomena that goes undetected in an ordinary spectral analysis.
  • We are studying the problems of modeling and inference for multivariate count time series data with Poisson marginals. The focus is on linear and log-linear models. For studying the properties of such processes we develop a novel conceptual framework which is based on copulas. However, our approach does not impose the copula on a vector of counts; instead the joint distribution is determined by imposing a copula function on a vector of associated continuous random variables. This specific construction avoids conceptual difficulties resulting from the joint distribution of discrete random variables yet it keeps the properties of the Poisson process marginally. We employ Markov chain theory and the notion of weak dependence to study ergodicity and stationarity of the models we consider. We obtain easily verifiable conditions for both linear and log-linear models under both theoretical frameworks. Suitable estimating equations are suggested for estimating unknown model parameters. The large sample properties of the resulting estimators are studied in detail. The work concludes with some simulations and a real data example.
  • Let $\textbf{X} = (X_1,\ldots, X_p)$ be a stochastic vector having joint density function $f_{\textbf{X}}(x)$ with partitions $\textbf{X}_1 = (X_1,\ldots, X_k)$ and $\textbf{X}_2 = (X_{k+1},\ldots, X_p)$. A new method for estimating the conditional density function of $\textbf{X}_1$ given $\textbf{X}_2$ is presented. It is based on locally Gaussian approximations, but simplified in order to tackle the curse of dimensionality in multivariate applications, where both response and explanatory variables can be vectors. We compare our method to some available competitors, and the error of approximation is shown to be small in a series of examples using real and simulated data, and the estimator is shown to be particularly robust against noise caused by independent variables. We also present examples of practical applications of our conditional density estimator in the analysis of time series. Typical values for $k$ in our examples are 1 and 2, and we include simulation experiments with values of $p$ up to 6. Large sample theory is established under a strong mixing condition.
  • In this paper, we study parametric nonlinear regression under the Harris recurrent Markov chain framework. We first consider the nonlinear least squares estimators of the parameters in the homoskedastic case, and establish asymptotic theory for the proposed estimators. Our results show that the convergence rates for the estimators rely not only on the properties of the nonlinear regression function, but also on the number of regenerations for the Harris recurrent Markov chain. Furthermore, we discuss the estimation of the parameter vector in a conditional volatility function, and apply our results to the nonlinear regression with $I(1)$ processes and derive an asymptotic distribution theory which is comparable to that obtained by Park and Phillips [Econometrica 69 (2001) 117-161]. Some numerical studies including simulation and empirical application are provided to examine the finite sample performance of the proposed approaches and results.
  • Estimation mainly for two classes of popular models, single-index and partially linear single-index models, is studied in this paper. Such models feature nonstationarity. Orthogonal series expansion is used to approximate the unknown integrable link functions in the models and a profile approach is used to derive the estimators. The findings include the dual rate of convergence of the estimators for the single-index models and a trio of convergence rates for the partially linear single-index models. A new central limit theorem is established for a plug-in estimator of the unknown link function. Meanwhile, a considerable extension to a class of partially nonlinear single-index models is discussed in Section 4. Monte Carlo simulation verifies these theoretical results. An empirical study furnishes an application of the proposed estimation procedures in practice.
  • This paper considers a class of nonparametric autoregressive models with nonstationarity. We propose a nonparametric kernel test for the conditional mean and then establish an asymptotic distribution of the proposed test. Both the setting and the results differ from earlier work on nonparametric autoregression with stationarity. In addition, we develop a new bootstrap simulation scheme for the selection of a suitable bandwidth parameter involved in the kernel test as well as the choice of a simulated critical value. The finite-sample performance of the proposed test is assessed using one simulated example and one real data example.
  • We propose to approximate the conditional expectation of a spatial random variable given its nearest-neighbour observations by an additive function. The setting is meaningful in practice and requires no unilateral ordering. It is capable of catching nonlinear features in spatial data and exploring local dependence structures. Our approach is different from both Markov field methods and disjunctive kriging. The asymptotic properties of the additive estimators have been established for $\alpha$-mixing spatial processes by extending the theory of the backfitting procedure to the spatial case. This facilitates the confidence intervals for the component functions, although the asymptotic biases have to be estimated via (wild) bootstrap. Simulation results are reported. Applications to real data illustrate that the improvement in describing the data over the auto-normal scheme is significant when nonlinearity or non-Gaussianity is pronounced.
  • We derive an asymptotic theory of nonparametric estimation for a time series regression model $Z_t=f(X_t)+W_t$, where \ensuremath\{X_t\} and \ensuremath\{Z_t\} are observed nonstationary processes and $\{W_t\}$ is an unobserved stationary process. In econometrics, this can be interpreted as a nonlinear cointegration type relationship, but we believe that our results are of wider interest. The class of nonstationary processes allowed for $\{X_t\}$ is a subclass of the class of null recurrent Markov chains. This subclass contains random walk, unit root processes and nonlinear processes. We derive the asymptotics of a nonparametric estimate of f(x) under the assumption that $\{W_t\}$ is a Markov chain satisfying some mixing conditions. The finite-sample properties of $\hat{f}(x)$ are studied by means of simulation experiments.
  • Nonparametric methods have been very popular in the last couple of decades in time series and regression, but no such development has taken place for spatial models. A rather obvious reason for this is the curse of dimensionality. For spatial data on a grid evaluating the conditional mean given its closest neighbors requires a four-dimensional nonparametric regression. In this paper a semiparametric spatial regression approach is proposed to avoid this problem. An estimation procedure based on combining the so-called marginal integration technique with local linear kernel estimation is developed in the semiparametric spatial regression setting. Asymptotic distributions are established under some mild conditions. The same convergence rates as in the one-dimensional regression case are established. An application of the methodology to the classical Mercer and Hall wheat data set is given and indicates that one directional component appears to be nonlinear, which has gone unnoticed in earlier analyses.