• We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at $\approx 4$ hr after the $\gamma$-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and, at late times, showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at $>10 $ GHz, to attempt identifying reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward-shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broad-band data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter ($A_*$), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well sampled light curves) to unambiguously identify the potential contribution of the reverse shock.
  • We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 square degrees surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the VLA confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200-inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z=0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt gamma-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ~10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step towards overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.
  • Only a few cases of type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta have been discovered and studied. Here we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of a Type Ic SN, PTF12gzk. The radio emission rapidly declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (~0.3c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ~10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the VLA (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), that are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions, as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.
  • We report the discovery by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) of the transient source PTF11agg, which is distinguished by three primary characteristics: (1) bright, rapidly fading optical transient emission; (2) a faint, blue quiescent optical counterpart; and (3) an associated year-long, scintillating radio transient. We argue that these observed properties are inconsistent with any known class of Galactic transients, and instead suggest a cosmological origin. The detection of incoherent radio emission at such distances implies a large emitting region, from which we infer the presence of relativistic ejecta. The observed properties are all consistent with the population of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), marking the first time such an outburst has been discovered in the distant universe independent of a high-energy trigger. We searched for possible high-energy counterparts to PTF11agg, but found no evidence for associated prompt emission. We therefore consider three possible scenarios to account for a GRB-like afterglow without a high-energy counterpart: an "untriggered" GRB (lack of satellite coverage), an "orphan" afterglow (viewing-angle effects), and a "dirty fireball" (suppressed high-energy emission). The observed optical and radio light curves appear inconsistent with even the most basic predictions for off-axis afterglow models. The simplest explanation, then, is that PTF11agg is a normal, on-axis long-duration GRB for which the associated high-energy emission was simply missed. However, we have calculated the likelihood of such a serendipitous discovery by PTF and find that it is quite small (~ 2.6%). While not definitive, we nonetheless speculate that PTF11agg may represent a new, more common (> 4 times the on-axis GRB rate at 90% confidence) class of relativistic outbursts lacking associated high-energy emission.
  • Many decades of observations of active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries have shown that relativistic jets are ubiquitous when compact objects accrete. One could therefore anticipate the launch of a jet after a star is disrupted and accreted by a massive black hole. This birth of a relativistic jet may have been observed recently in two stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs), which were discovered in gamma-rays by Swift. Yet no transient radio emission has been detected from the tens of TDF candidates that were discovered at optical to soft X-ray frequencies. Because the sample that was followed-up at radio frequencies is small, the non-detections can be explained by Doppler boosting, which reduces the jet flux for off-axis observers. And since the existing follow-up observation are mostly within ~10 months of the discovery, the non-detections can also be due to a delay of the radio emission with respect to the time of disruption. To test the conjecture that all TDFs launch jets, we obtained 5 GHz follow-up observations with the Jansky VLA of seven known TDFs. To avoid missing delayed jet emission, our observations probe 1-8 years since the estimated time of disruption. None of the sources are detected, with very deep upper limits at the 10 micro Jansky level. These observations rule out the hypothesis that these TDFs launched jets similar to radio-loud quasars. We also constrain the possibility that the flares hosted a jet identical to Sw 1644+57, the first and best-sampled relativistic TDF. We thus obtain evidence for a dichotomy in the stellar tidal disruption population, implying that the jet launching mechanism is sensitive to the parameters of the disruption.
  • Only a handful of supernovae (SNe) have been studied in multi-wavelength from radio to X-rays, starting a few days after explosion. The early detection and classification of the nearby type IIb SN2011dh/PTF11eon in M51 provides a unique opportunity to conduct such observations. We present detailed data obtained at the youngest phase ever of a core-collapse supernova (days 3 to 12 after explosion) in the radio, millimeter and X-rays; when combined with optical data, this allows us to explore the early evolution of the SN blast wave and its surroundings. Our analysis shows that the expanding supernova shockwave does not exhibit equipartition (e_e/e_B ~ 1000), and is expanding into circumstellar material that is consistent with a density profile falling like R^-2. Within modeling uncertainties we find an average velocity of the fast parts of the ejecta of 15,000 +/- 1800 km/s, contrary to previous analysis. This velocity places SN 2011dh in an intermediate blast-wave regime between the previously defined compact and extended SN IIb subtypes. Our results highlight the importance of early (~ 1 day) high-frequency observations of future events. Moreover, we show the importance of combined radio/X-ray observations for determining the microphysics ratio e_e/e_B.
  • The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will give us an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the transient sky at radio wavelengths. In this paper we present VAST, an ASKAP survey for Variables and Slow Transients. VAST will exploit the wide-field survey capabilities of ASKAP to enable the discovery and investigation of variable and transient phenomena from the local to the cosmological, including flare stars, intermittent pulsars, X-ray binaries, magnetars, extreme scattering events, interstellar scintillation, radio supernovae and orphan afterglows of gamma ray bursts. In addition, it will allow us to probe unexplored regions of parameter space where new classes of transient sources may be detected. In this paper we review the known radio transient and variable populations and the current results from blind radio surveys. We outline a comprehensive program based on a multi-tiered survey strategy to characterise the radio transient sky through detection and monitoring of transient and variable sources on the ASKAP imaging timescales of five seconds and greater. We also present an analysis of the expected source populations that we will be able to detect with VAST.
  • We report the discovery by the Swift hard X-ray monitor of the transient source Swift J2058.4+0516 (Sw J2058+05). Our multi-wavelength follow-up campaign uncovered a long-lived (duration >~ months), luminous X-ray (L_X,iso ~ 3 x 10^47 erg s^-1) and radio (nu L_nu,iso ~ 10^42 erg s^-1) counterpart. The associated optical emission, however, from which we measure a redshift of 1.1853, is relatively faint, and this is not due to a large amount of dust extinction in the host galaxy. Based on numerous similarities with the recently discovered GRB 110328A / Swift J164449.3+573451 (Sw J1644+57), we suggest that Sw J2058+05 may be the second member of a new class of relativistic outbursts resulting from the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole. If so, the relative rarity of these sources (compared with the expected rate of tidal disruptions) implies that either these outflows are extremely narrowly collimated (theta < 1 degree), or only a small fraction of tidal disruptions generate relativistic ejecta. Analogous to the case of long-duration gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae, we speculate that rapid spin of the black hole may be a necessary condition to generate the relativistic component. Alternatively, if powered by gas accretion (i.e., an active galactic nucleus [AGN]), Sw J2058+05 would seem to represent a new mode of variability in these sources, as the observed properties appear largely inconsistent with known classes of AGNs capable of generating relativistic jets (blazars, narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies).
  • From the first two seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory, we identify three peculiar transients (PTF09dav, PTF10iuv, PTF11bij) with five distinguishing characteristics: peak luminosity in the gap between novae and supernovae (M_R = 15.5 to -16.5), rapid photometric evolution (rise-time ~12--15 days), large photospheric velocities (~6000 to 11000 km/s), early spectroscopic evolution into nebular phase (~1 to 3 months) and peculiar nebular spectra dominated by Calcium. We also culled the extensive decade-long Lick Observatory Supernova Search database and identified an additional member of this group, SN 2007ke. Our choice of photometric and spectroscopic properties was motivated by SN 2005E (Perets et al. 2010). To our surprise, as in the case of SN 2005E, all four members of this group are also clearly offset from the bulk of their host galaxy. Given the well-sampled early and late-time light curves, we derive ejecta masses in the range of 0.4--0.7 Msun. Spectroscopically, we find that there may be a diversity in the photospheric phase, but the commonality is in the unusual nebular spectra. Our extensive follow-up observations rule out standard thermonuclear and standard core-collapse explosions for this class of "Calcium-rich gap" transients. If the progenitor is a white dwarf, we are likely seeing a detonation of the white dwarf core and perhaps, even shockfront interaction with a previously ejected nova shell. In the less likely scenario of a massive star progenitor, a very non-standard channel specific to a low-metallicity environment needs to be invoked (e.g., ejecta fallback leading to black hole formation). Detection (or lack thereof) of a faint underlying host (dwarf galaxy, cluster) will provide a crucial and decisive diagnostic to choose between these alternatives.
  • We present the discovery and characterisation of PTF10iya, a short-lived (dt ~ 10 d, with an optical decay rate of ~ 0.3 mag per d), luminous (M_g ~ -21 mag) transient source found by the Palomar Transient Factory. The ultraviolet/optical spectral energy distribution is reasonably well fit by a blackbody with T ~ 1-2 x 10^4 K and peak bolometric luminosity L_BB ~ 1-5 x 10^44 erg per s (depending on the details of the extinction correction). A comparable amount of energy is radiated in the X-ray band that appears to result from a distinct physical process. The location of PTF10iya is consistent with the nucleus of a star-forming galaxy (z = 0.22405 +/- 0.00006) to within 350 mas (99.7 per cent confidence radius), or a projected distance of less than 1.2 kpc. At first glance, these properties appear reminiscent of the characteristic "big blue bump" seen in the near-ultraviolet spectra of many active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, emission-line diagnostics of the host galaxy, along with a historical light curve extending back to 2007, show no evidence for AGN-like activity. We therefore consider whether the tidal disruption of a star by an otherwise quiescent supermassive black hole may account for our observations. Though with limited temporal information, PTF10iya appears broadly consistent with the predictions for the early "super-Eddington" phase of a solar-type star disrupted by a ~ 10^7 M_sun black hole. Regardless of the precise physical origin of the accreting material, the large luminosity and short duration suggest that otherwise quiescent galaxies can transition extremely rapidly to radiate near the Eddington limit; many such outbursts may have been missed by previous surveys lacking sufficient cadence.
  • We review the class of galactic supernova remnants which show strong interactions with molecular clouds, revealed through shock-excited hydroxyl masers. These remnants are preferentially found among the known GeV and TeV detections of supernova remnants. It has been argued that the masers trace out the sites of hadronic particle acceleration. We discuss what is known about the physical conditions of these shocked regions and we introduce a potential new maser tracer for identifying the sites of cosmic ray acceleration. This review includes a reasonably complete bibliography for researchers new to the topic of shock-excited masers and supernova remnants.
  • We present photometry and spectroscopy of the peculiar TypeII supernova (SN) 2010jp, also named PTF10aaxi. The light curve exhibits a linear decline with a relatively low peak absolute magnitude of only -15.9, and a low radioactive decay luminosity at late times that suggests a nickel mass below 0.003 $M_{\odot}$. Spectra of SN2010jp display an unprecedented triple-peaked H$\alpha$ line profile, showing: (1) a narrow (800 km/s) central component that suggests shock interaction with dense CSM; (2) high-velocity blue and red emission features centered at -12600 and +15400 km/s; and (3) broad wings extending from -22000 to +25000 km/s. These features persist during 100 days after explosion. We propose that this line profile indicates a bipolar jet-driven explosion, with the central component produced by normal SN ejecta and CSM interaction at mid latitudes, while the high-velocity bumps and broad line wings arise in a nonrelativistic bipolar jet. Two variations of the jet interpretation seem plausible: (1) A fast jet mixes 56Ni to high velocities in polar zones of the H-rich envelope, or (2) the reverse shock in the jet produces blue and red bumps in Balmer lines when a jet interacts with dense CSM. Jet-driven SNeII are predicted for collapsars resulting from a wide range of initial masses above 25 $M_{\odot}$ at sub-solar metallicity. This seems consistent with the SN host environment, which is either an extremely low-luminosity dwarf galaxy or very remote parts of an interacting pair of star-forming galaxies. It also seems consistent with the low 56Ni mass that may accompany black hole formation. We speculate that the jet survives to produce observable signatures because the star's H envelope was mostly stripped away by previous eruptive mass loss.
  • We augment the two widest/deepest 1.4 GHz radio surveys: the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST), with the mean epoch in which each source was observed. We use these catalogs to search for unresolved sources which vary between the FIRST and NVSS epochs. We find 43 variable sources (0.1% of the sources) which vary by more than 4 sigma, and we construct the mean structure function of these objects. This enables us to explore radio variability on time scales between several months and about five years. We find that on these time scales, the mean structure function of the variable sources is consistent with a flat structure function. A plausible explanation to these observations is that a large fraction of the variability at 1.4 GHz is induced by scintillations in the interstellar medium, rather than by intrinsic variability. Finally, for a sub sample of the variables for which the redshift is available, we do not find strong evidence for a correlation between the variability amplitude and the source redshift.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is systematically charting the optical transient and variable sky. A primary science driver of PTF is building a complete inventory of transients in the local Universe (distance less than 200 Mpc). Here, we report the discovery of PTF10fqs, a transient in the luminosity "gap" between novae and supernovae. Located on a spiral arm of Messier 99, PTF 10fqs has a peak luminosity of Mr = -12.3, red color (g-r = 1.0) and is slowly evolving (decayed by 1 mag in 68 days). It has a spectrum dominated by intermediate-width H (930 km/s) and narrow calcium emission lines. The explosion signature (the light curve and spectra) is overall similar to thatof M85OT2006-1, SN2008S, and NGC300OT. The origin of these events is shrouded in mystery and controversy (and in some cases, in dust). PTF10fqs shows some evidence of a broad feature (around 8600A) that may suggest very large velocities (10,000 km/s) in this explosion. Ongoing surveys can be expected to find a few such events per year. Sensitive spectroscopy, infrared monitoring and statistics (e.g. disk versus bulge) will eventually make it possible for astronomers to unravel the nature of these mysterious explosions.
  • We report the discovery of radio afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst GRB 090423, which exploded at a redshift of 8.3, making it the object with the highest known redshift in the Universe. By combining our radio measurements with existing X-ray and infrared observations, we estimate the kinetic energy of the afterglow, the geometry of the outflow and the density of the circumburst medium. Our best fit model is a quasi-spherical, high-energy explosion in a low, constant-density medium. \event had a similar energy release to the other well-studied high redshift GRB 050904 ($z=6.26$), but their circumburst densities differ by two orders of magnitude. We compare the properties of \event with a sample of GRBs at moderate redshifts. We find that the high energy and afterglow properties of \event are not sufficiently different from other GRBs to suggest a different kind of progenitor, such as a Population III star. However, we argue that it is not clear that the afterglow properties alone can provide convincing identification of Population III progenitors. We suggest that the millimeter and centimeter radio detections of \event at early times contained emission from a reverse shock component. This has important implications for the detection of high redshift GRBs by the next generation of radio facilities.
  • We had previously reported on a survey for radio transients, used to set an upper limit on the number of orphan gamma-ray burst (GRB) radio afterglows, and thus a lower limit on the typical GRB beaming factor. Here we report radio and optical follow-up observations of these possible transients, achieving the first full characterization of the transient radio sky. We find that only two source are likely to be real radio transients, an optically obscured radio supernova (SN) in the nearby galaxy NGC 4216, and a source not associated with a bright host galaxy, which is too radio luminous to be a GRB afterglow. We speculate that this may be a flare from a peculiar active galactic nucleus, or a burst from an unusual Galactic compact object. We place an upper limit of 65 radio transients above 6 mJy over the entire sky at the 95% confidence level. The implications are as follows. First, we derive a limit on the typical beaming of GRBs; we find f_b^{-1} >~ 60, ~5 times higher than our earlier results. Second, we impose an upper limit on the rate of events that eject >~ 10^{51} erg in unconfined relativistic ejecta, whether or not accompanied by detectable emission in wavebands other than the radio. Our estimated rate, <=1000/y/Gpc, is about two orders of magnitude smaller than the rate of core-collapse SNe (and type Ib/c events in particular), indicating that only a minority of such events eject significant amounts of relativistic material, which are required by fireball models of long-soft GRBs. Finally, we show that future wider and/or deeper radio variability surveys are expected to detect numerous orphan radio GRB afterglows. Our survey also illustrates the great potential of sensitive surveys with new instruments to revolutionize the study of nearby SNe (abridged).
  • Radio afterglow studies have become an integral part of the study of gamma-ray bursts, providing complementary and sometimes unique diagnostics on GRB explosions, their progenitors, and their environments. This brief review consists of two parts. The first section is a summary of current search strategies and the main observational properties of radio afterglows. In the second section we highlight the key scientific contributions made by radio observations, either alone or as part of panchromatic studies.
  • We present observations of molecular gas made with the 15-m James Clark Maxwell Telescope toward the sites of OH(1720 MHz) masers in three supernova remnants: W28, W44 and 3C391. Maps made in the 12CO J=3-2 line reveal that the OH masers are preferentially located along the edges of thin filaments or clumps of molecular gas. There is a strong correlation between the morphology of the molecular gas and the relativistic gas traced by synchrotron emission at centimeter wavelengths. Broad CO line widths (dV=30-50 km/s) are seen along these gaseous ridges, while narrow lines are seen off the ridges. The ratio of H2CO line strengths is used to determine temperatures in the broad-line gas of 80 K, and the 13CO J=3-2 column density suggests densities of 10^4-10^5 cm{-3}. These observations support the hypothesis that the OH(1720 MHz) masers originate in post-shock gas, heated by the passage of a supernova remnant shock through dense molecular gas. From the observational constraints on the density, velocity and magnetic field we examine the physical properties of the shock and discuss the shock-production of OH. These OH(1720 MHz) masers are useful ``signposts'', which point to the most promising locations to study supernova remnant/molecular cloud interactions.
  • This paper reports on a workshop hosted by the University of Minnesota, March 23-26, 1997. It addressed fundamental dynamical issues associated with the evolution of shell supernova remnants and the relationships between supernova remnants and their environments. The workshop considered, in addition to classical shell SNRs, dynamical issues involving X-ray filled composite remnants and pulsar driven shells, such as that in the Crab Nebula. Approximately 75 participants with wide ranging interests attended the workshop. An even larger community helped through extensive on-line debates prior to the meeting. Each of the several sessions, organized mostly around chronological labels, also addressed some underlying, general physical themes: How are SNR dynamics and structures modified by the character of the CSM and the ISM and vice versa? How are magnetic fields generated in SNRs and how do magnetic fields influence SNRs? Where and how are cosmic-rays (electrons and ions) produced in SNRs and how does their presence influence or reveal SNR dynamics? How does SNR blast energy partition into various components over time and what controls conversion between components? In lieu of a proceedings volume, we present here a synopsis of the workshop in the form of brief summaries of the workshop sessions. The sharpest impressions from the workshop were the crucial and under-appreciated roles that environments have on SNR appearance and dynamics and the critical need for broad-based studies to understand these beautiful, but enigmatic objects. \\
  • Radio observations of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB970508 provide unique new constraints on afterglow models. The quenching of diffractive scintillation at 4 week delay provides the first direct estimate of source size and expansion rate. It implies an apparent size $R\sim10^{17}$cm and expansion at a speed comparable to that of light at 4 weeks delay, in agreement with the fireball model prediction $R=10^{17}(t/week)^{5/8}$cm. The radio flux and its dependence on time and frequency at 1--5 week delay are in agreement with the model and imply a fireball energy (assuming spherical symmetry) of order 10^{52}erg, consistent with the value inferred from observations at shorter delay. The observed radio behavior deviates from model predictions at delays larger than 5 weeks. This is expected, since at this delay the fireball is in transition from highly-relativistic to sub-relativistic expansion, with Lorentz factor \gamma<2. Deviation may be due to a change in the physical processes associated with the shock wave as it becomes sub-relativistic (e.g. a decrease in the fraction of energy carried by magnetic field), or to the fireball being a cone of opening angle $1/\gamma\sim0.5$. We predict the future behavior of the radio flux assuming that the latter interpretation is valid. These predictions may be tested by radio observations in the frequency range 0.1--10GHz on time scale of months.