• Over the past number of years, great strides have been made in identifying the various low-order magnetohydrodynamic wave modes observable in a number of magnetic structures found within the solar atmosphere. However, one aspect of these modes that has remained elusive, until now, is their designation as either surface or body modes. This property has significant implications on how these modes transfer energy from the waveguide to the surrounding plasma. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we present conclusive, direct evidence of these wave characteristics in numerous pores which were observed to support sausage modes. As well as outlining methods to detect these modes in observations, we make estimates of the energies associated with each mode. We find surface modes more frequently in the data, and also that surface modes appear to carry more energy than those displaying signatures of body modes. We find frequencies in the range of ~2 to 12 mHz with body modes as high as 11 mHz, but we do not find surface modes above 10 mHz. It is expected that the techniques we have applied will help researchers search for surface and body signatures in other modes and in differing structures to those presented here.
  • Solar chromospheric observations of sunspot umbrae offer an exceptional view of magneto-hydrodynamic wave phenomena. In recent years, a wealth of wave signatures related to propagating magneto-acoustic modes have been presented, which demonstrate complex spatial and temporal structuring of the wave components. Theoretical modelling has demonstrated how these ubiquitous waves are consistent with an m=0 slow magneto-acoustic mode, which are excited by trapped sub-photospheric acoustic (p-mode) waves. However, the spectrum of umbral waves is broad, suggesting that the observed signatures represent the superposition of numerous frequencies and/or modes. We apply Fourier filtering, in both spatial and temporal domains, to extract chromospheric umbral wave characteristics consistent with an m=1 slow magneto-acoustic mode. This identification has not been described before. Angular frequencies of 0.037 +/- 0.007 rad/s (2.1 +/- 0.4 deg/s), corresponding to a period approximately 170 s for the m=1 mode are uncovered for spatial wavenumbers in the range of 0.45<k<0.90 arcsec^-1 (5000-9000 km). Theoretical dispersion relations are solved, with corresponding eigenfunctions computed, which allows the density perturbations to be investigated and compared with our observations. Such magnetohydrodynamic modelling confirms our interpretation that the identified wave signatures are the first direct observations of an m=1 slow magneto-acoustic mode in the chromospheric umbra of a sunspot.
  • We investigate the scaling properties of the long-range temporal evolution and intermittency of SDO/AIA intensity observations in four solar environments: an active region core, a weak emission region, and two core loops. We use two approaches: the probability distribution function (PDF) of time series increments, and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Noise taints the results, so we focus on the 171 Angstrom waveband , which has the highest signal-to-noise ratio. The lags between pairs of wavebands distinguish between coronal versus transition region (TR) emission. In all physical regions studied, scaling in the range 15-45 min is multifractal, and the time series are anti-persistent on the average. The degree of anti-correlation in the TR time series is greater than for coronal emission. The multifractality stems from long term correlations in the data rather than the wide distribution of intensities. Observations in the 335 Angstrom waveband can be described in terms of a multifractal with added noise. The multiscaling of the EUV data agrees qualitatively with the radiance from a phenomenological model of impulsive bursts plus noise, and also from ohmic dissipation in a reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) model for coronal loop heating. The parameter space must be further explored to seek quantitative agreement. Thus, the observational signatures obtained by the combined tests of the PDF of increments and the MF-DFA offer strong constraints which can systematically discriminate among models for coronal heating.
  • We explore the question of the rapid buildup of black hole mass in the early universe employing a growing black hole mass-based determination of both jet and disk powers predicted in recent theoretical work on black hole accretion and jet formation. Despite simplified, even artificial assumptions about accretion and mergers, we identify an interesting low probability channel for the growth of one billion solar mass black holes within hundreds of millions of years of the Big Bang without appealing to super Eddington accretion. This result is made more compelling by the recognition of a connection between this channel and an end product involving active galaxies with FRI radio morphology but weaker jet powers in mildly sub-Eddington accretion regimes. While FRI quasars have already been shown to occupy a small region of the available parameter space for black hole feedback in the paradigm, we further suggest that the observational dearth of FRI quasars is also related to their connection to the most massive black hole growth due to both these FRIs high redshifts and relative weakness. Our results also allow us to construct the AGN luminosity function at high redshift, that agree with recent studies. In short, we produce a connection between the unexplained paucity of a given family of active galactic nuclei and the rapid growth of supermassive black holes, two heretofore seemingly unrelated aspects of the physics of active galactic nuclei.
  • We provide a theoretical context for understanding the recent work of Kalfountzou et al (2014) showing that star formation is enhanced at lower optical luminosity in radio loud quasars. Our proposal for coupling the assumption of collimated FRII quasar jet-induced star formation with lower accretion optical luminosity, also explains the observed jet power peak in active galaxies at higher redshift compared to the peak in accretion power, doing so in a way that predicts the existence of a family of radio quiet AGN associated with rapidly spinning supermassive black holes at low redshift, as mounting observations suggest. The relevance of this work lies in its promise to explain the observed cosmological evolution of accretion power, jet power, and star formation, in a way that is both compatible with the Soltan argument and resolves the so-called `Meier Paradox'.
  • During the "WISE at 5: Legacy and Prospects" conference in Pasadena, CA -- which ran from February 10 - 12, 2015 -- attendees were invited to engage in an interactive session exploring the future uses of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. The 65 participants -- many of whom are extensive users of the data -- brainstormed the top questions still to be answered by the mission, as well as the complementary current and future datasets and additional processing of WISE/NEOWISE data that would aid in addressing these most important scientific questions. The results were mainly bifurcated between topics related to extragalactic studies (e.g. AGN, QSOs) and substellar mass objects. In summary, participants found that complementing WISE/NEOWISE data with cross-correlated multiwavelength surveys (e.g. SDSS, Pan-STARRS, LSST, Gaia, Euclid, etc.) would be highly beneficial for all future mission goals. Moreover, developing or implementing machine-learning tools to comb through and understand cross-correlated data was often mentioned for future uses. Finally, attendees agreed that additional processing of the data such as co-adding WISE and NEOWISE and extracting a multi-epoch photometric database and parallax and proper motion catalog would greatly improve the scientific results of the most important projects identified. In that respect, a project such as MaxWISE which would execute the most important additional processing and extraction as well as make the data and catalogs easily accessible via a public portal was deemed extremely important.
  • We have obtained H$\alpha$ high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and the {\it Hinode} ExtremeUltraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The H$\alpha$ observations were conducted on 11 February 2012 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera (HARDcam) instrument at the National Solar Observatory's Dunn Solar Telescope. Our H$\alpha$ observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations ("blobs") returning to the solar surface at velocities of $\approx$200 km s$^{-1}$ in both H$\alpha$ and several SDO AIA band passes. The average derived size of these "blobs" in H$\alpha$ is 500 by 3000 km$^2$ in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our "blob" widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate there are additional smaller, unresolved "blobs" in agreement with previous studies and recent numerical simulations. Our observed velocities and decelerations of the "blobs" in both H$\alpha$ and SDO bands are less than those expected for gravitational free-fall and imply additional magnetic or gas pressure impeding the flow. We derived a kinetic energy $\approx$2 orders of magnitude lower for the main eruption than a typical CME, which may explain its partial nature.
  • The fundamental plane for black hole activity constitutes a tight correlation between jet power, X-ray luminosity, and black hole mass. Under the assumption that a Blandford-Znajek-type mechanism, which relies on black hole spin, contributes non-negligibly to jet production, the sufficiently small scatter in the fundamental plane shows that black hole spin differences of $\mid$$\Delta$a$\mid \sim$1 are not typical among the active galactic nuclei population. If $-$ as it seems $-$ radio loud and radio quiet objects are both faithful to the fundamental plane, models of black hole accretion in which the radio loud/radio quiet dichotomy is based on a spin dichotomy of a$\sim$1/a$\sim$0, respectively, are difficult to reconcile with the observations. We show how recent theoretical work based on differences in accretion flow orientation between retrograde and prograde, accommodates a small scatter in the fundamental plane for objects that do have non-negligible differences in black hole spin values. We also show that the dichotomy in spin between the most radio loud and the most radio quiet involves $\mid$$\Delta$a$\mid \approx$0. And, finally, we show how the picture that produces compatibility with the fundamental plane, also allows one to interpret other otherwise puzzling observations of jets across the mass scale including 1) the recently observed inverse relation between radio and X-rays at higher Eddington ratios in both black hole X-ray binaries as well as active galactic nuclei and 2) the apparent contradiction between jet power and black hole spin observed in X-ray hard and transitory burst states in X-ray binaries.
  • We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0 to 2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected 5 comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are: C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model (Bodewits et al. 2007). Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV that we identify as being created by solar wind charge exchange lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700 to 2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.
  • We use high spatial resolution observations and numerical simulations to study the velocity distribution of solar photospheric magnetic bright points. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope, while the numerical simulations were undertaken with the MURaM code for average magnetic fields of 200 G and 400 G. We implemented an automated bright point detection and tracking algorithm on the dataset, and studied the subsequent velocity characteristics of over 6000 structures, finding an average velocity of approximately 1 km/s, with maximum values of 7 km/s. Furthermore, merging magnetic bright points were found to have considerably higher velocities, and significantly longer lifetimes, than isolated structures. By implementing a new and novel technique, we were able to estimate the background magnetic flux of our observational data, which is consistent with a field strength of 400 G.
  • We investigate if the super-saturation phenomenon observed at X-ray wavelengths for the corona, exists in the chromosphere for rapidly rotating late-type stars. Moderate resolution optical spectra of fast rotating EUV- and X-ray- selected late-type stars were obtained. Stars in alpha Per were observed in the northern hemisphere with the Isaac Newton 2.5 m telescope and IDS spectrograph. Selected objects from IC 2391 and IC 2602 were observe in the southern hemisphere with the Blanco 4m telescope and R-C spectrograph at CTIO. Ca II H & K fluxes were measured for all stars in our sample. We find the saturation level for Ca II K at log(L_CaK/L_bol) = -4.08. The Ca II K flux does not show a decrease as a function of increased rotational velocity or smaller Rossby number as observed in the X-ray. This lack of "super-saturation" supports the idea of coronal-stripping as the cause of saturation and super-saturation in stellar chromospheres and corona, but the detailed underlying mechanism is still under investigation.
  • A growing number (over 100!) of extra-solar planets (ESPs) have been discovered by transit photometry, and these systems are important because the transit strongly constrains their orbital inclination and allows accurate physical parameters for the planet to be derived, especially their radii. Their mass-radius relation allows us to probe their internal structure. In the present work we calculate Safronov numbers for the current sample of ESP and compare their masses and radii to current models with the goal of obtaining better constrains on their formation processe. Our calculation of Safronov numbers for the current TESP sample does show 2 classes, although about 20% lie above the formal Class I definition. These trends and recent results that argue against a useful distinction between Safronov classes are under further investigation. Mass-radius relations for the current sample of TESP are inconsistent with ESP models with very large core masses (\geq 100 M\oplus). Most TESP with radii near 1RJ are consistent with models with no core mass or core masses of 10 M\oplus . The inflated planets, with radii \geq 1.2 RJ are not consistent with current ESP models, but may lie along the lower end of models for brown dwarfs. Although such models are nascent, it is important to establish trends for the current sample of ESP, which will further the understanding of their formation and evolution.