• The swap test is a central primitive in quantum information, providing an efficient way of comparing two unknown quantum states. In this work, we generalise this test for the case where one has access to multiple copies of a reference state, but to only one copy of the tested state. We present a circuit implementing this test and propose a simple linear optical implementation using the Hadamard interferometer. We show that both the circuit and the interferometer can be used as programmable projective measurement devices, with a precision scaling with their size. This also leads to a natural interpretation of the notion of projective measurement in quantum mechanics.
  • We present a simple protocol for certifying graph states in quantum networks using stabiliser measurements. The certification statements can easily be applied to different protocols using graph states. We see for example how it can be used to for measurement based verified quantum compu- tation, certified sampling of random unitaries and quantum metrology and sharing quantum secrets over untrusted channels.
  • We introduce a new family of quantum circuits in Continuous Variables and we show that, relying on the widely accepted conjecture that the polynomial hierarchy of complexity classes does not collapse, their output probability distribution cannot be efficiently simulated by a classical computer. These circuits are composed of input photon-subtracted (or photon-added) squeezed states, passive linear optics evolution, and eight-port homodyne detection. We address the proof of hardness for the exact probability distribution of these quantum circuits by exploiting mappings onto different architectures of sub-universal quantum computers. We obtain both a worst-case and an average-case hardness result. Hardness of Boson Sampling with eight-port homodyne detection is obtained as the zero squeezing limit of our model. We conclude with a discussion on the relevance and interest of the present model in connection to experimental applications and classical simulations.
  • Measurement based (MB) quantum computation allows for universal quantum computing by measuring individual qubits prepared in entangled multipartite states, known as graph states. Unless corrected for, the randomness of the measurements leads to the generation of ensembles of random unitaries, where each random unitary is identified with a string of possible measurement results. We show that repeating an MB scheme an efficient number of times, on a simple graph state, with measurements at fixed angles and no feed-forward corrections, produces a random unitary ensemble that is an {\epsilon}-approximate t-design on n-qubits. Unlike previous constructions, the graph is regular and is also a universal resource for measurement based quantum computing, closely related to the brickwork state
  • Quantum mechanics is known to provide significant improvements in information processing tasks when compared to classical models. These advantages range from computational speeds-up to security improvements. A key question is where these advantages come from. The toy model developed by Spekkens [R. W. Spekkens PRA 75, 032110 (2012)] mimics many of the features of quantum mechanics, such as entanglement and no-cloning, regarded as being important in this regard, despite being a local hidden variable theory. In this work we study several protocols within Spekkens' toy model where we see it can also mimic the advantages and limitations shown in the quantum case. We first provide explicit proofs for the impossibility of toy bit-commitment and the existence of a toy error correction protocol and consequent $k-$threshold secret sharing. Then, defining a toy computational model based on the quantum one-way computer we prove the existence of blind and verified protocols. Importantly, these two last quantum protocols are known to achieve a better-than-classical security. Our results suggest that such quantum improvements need not arise from any Bell-type non locality or contextuality, but rather as a consequence of steering correlations.
  • In this work we present a generalization of the recently developed Hardy-like logical proof of contextuality and of the so-called KCBS contextuality inequality for any qudit of dimension greater than three. Our approach uses compatibility graphs that can only be satisfied by qudits. We find a construction for states and measurements that satisfy these graphs and demonstrate both logical and inequality based contextuality for qudits. Interestingly, the quantum violation of the inequality is constant as dimension increases. We also discuss the issue of imprecision in experimental implementations of contextuality tests and a way of addressing this problem using the notion of ontological faithfulness.
  • Entangled multipartite states are resources for universal quantum computation, but they can also give rise to ensembles of unitary transformations, a topic usually studied in the context of random quantum circuits. Using several graph state techniques, we show that these resources can `derandomize' circuit results by sampling the same kinds of ensembles quantum mechanically, (analogously to a quantum random number generator). Furthermore, we find simple examples that give rise to new ensembles whose statistical moments exactly match those of the uniformly random distribution over all unitaries up to order $t$, while foregoing adaptive feed-forward entirely. Such ensembles -- known as $t$-designs -- often cannot be distinguished from the `truly' random ensemble, and so they find use in many applications that require this implied notion of pseudorandomness.
  • We investigate in this work a quantum error correction on a five-qubits graph state used for secret sharing through five noisy channels. We describe the procedure for the five, seven and nine qubits codes. It is known that the three codes always allow error recovery if only one among the sents qubits is disturbed in the transmitting channel. However, if two qubits and more are disturbed, then the correction will depend on the used code.
  • Multipartite nonlocality is of great fundamental interest and constitutes a useful resource for many quantum information protocols. However, demonstrating it in practice, by violating a Bell inequality, can be difficult. In particular, standard experimental setups require the alignment of distant parties' reference frames, which can be challenging or impossible in practice. In this work we study the violation of certain Bell inequalities, namely the Mermin, Mermin-Klyshko and Svetlichny inequalities, without shared reference frames, when parties share a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state. Furthermore, we analyse how these violations demonstrate genuine multipartite features of entanglement and nonlocality. For 3, 4 and 5 parties, we show that it is possible to violate these inequalities with high probability, when the parties choose their measurements from the three Pauli operators, defined only with respect to their local frames. Moreover, the probability of violation, and the amount of violation, are increased when each party chooses their measurements from the four operators describing the vertices of a tetrahedron. We also consider how many randomly chosen measurement directions are needed to violate the Bell inequalities with high probability. We see that the obtained levels of violation are sufficient to also demonstrate genuine multipartite entanglement and nonseparability. Finally, we show analytically that choosing from two measurement settings per party is sufficient to demonstrate the maximum degree of genuine multipartite entanglement and nonseparability with certainty when the parties' reference frames are aligned in one direction so that they differ only in rotations around one axis.
  • Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any measurement-based quantum computation on a graph state with \emph{gflow} can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call \emph{adiabatic graph-state quantum computation} (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of $\dot{H}$ as well as the degree of $H$, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.
  • Simply and reliably detecting and quantifying entanglement outside laboratory conditions will be essential for future quantum information technologies. Here we address this issue by proposing a method for generating expressions which can perform this task between two parties who do not share a common reference frame. These reference frame independent expressions only require simple local measurements, which allows us to experimentally test them using an off-the-shelf entangled photon source. We show that the values of these expressions provide bounds on the concurrence of the state, and demonstrate experimentally that these bounds are more reliable than values obtained from state tomography since characterizing experimental errors is easier in our setting. Furthermore, we apply this idea to other quantities, such as the Renyi and von Neumann entropies, which are also more reliably calculated directly from the raw data than from a tomographically reconstructed state. This highlights the relevance of our approach for practical quantum information applications that require entanglement.
  • In this work we address the issue of sharing a quantum secret over untrusted channels between the dealer and players. Existing methods require entanglement over a number of systems which scales with the security parameter, quickly becoming impractical. We present protocols (interactive and a non-interactive) where single copy encodings are sufficient. Our protocols work for all quantum secret sharing schemes and access structures, and are implementable with current experimental set ups. For a single authorised player, our protocols act as quantum authentication protocols.
  • We propose a systematic scheme for the construction of graphs associated with binary stabilizer codes. The scheme is characterized by three main steps: first, the stabilizer code is realized as a codeword-stabilized (CWS) quantum code; second, the canonical form of the CWS code is uncovered; third, the input vertices are attached to the graphs. To check the effectiveness of the scheme, we discuss several graphical constructions of various useful stabilizer codes characterized by single and multi-qubit encoding operators. In particular, the error-correcting capabilities of such quantum codes are verified in graph-theoretic terms as originally advocated by Schlingemann and Werner. Finally, possible generalizations of our scheme for the graphical construction of both (stabilizer and nonadditive) nonbinary and continuous-variable quantum codes are briefly addressed.
  • We present a general scheme for sharing quantum secrets, and an extension to sharing classical secrets, which contain all known quantum secret sharing schemes. In this framework we show the equivalence of existence of both schemes, that is, the existence of a scheme sharing a quantum secret implies the extended classical secret sharing scheme works, and vice versa. As a consequence of this we find new schemes sharing classical secrets for arbitrary access structures. We then clarify the relationship to quantum error correction and observe several restrictions thereby imposed, which for example indicates that for pure state threshold schemes the share size $q$ must scale with the number of players $n$ as $q\geq \sqrt{n}$. These results also provide a new way of searching for quantum error correcting codes.
  • The question of which and how a particular class of entangled resource states (known as graph states) can be used for measurement based quantum computation (MBQC) recently gave rise to the notion of Flow and its generalisation gFlow. That is a causal structure for measurements guaranteeing deterministic computation. Furthermore, gFlow has proven itself to be a powerful tool in studying the difference between the measurement-based and circuit models for quantum computing, as well as analysing cryptographic protocols. On the other hand, entanglement is known to play a crucial role in MBQC. In this paper we first show how gFlow can be used to directly give a bound on the classical simulation of an MBQC. Our method offers an interpretation of the gFlow as showing how information flows through a computation, giving rise to an information light cone. We then establish a link between entanglement and the existence of gFlow for a graph state. We show that the gFlow can be used to bound the entanglement width and what we call the \emph{structural entanglement} of a graph state. In turn this gives another method relating the gFlow to bounds on how efficiently a computation can be simulated classically. These two methods of getting bounds on the difficulty of classical simulation are different and complementary and several known results follow. In particular known relations between the MBQC and the circuit model allow these results to be translated across models.
  • We give graphical characterisation of the access structure to both classical and quantum information encoded onto a multigraph defined for prime dimension $q$, as well as explicit decoding operations for quantum secret sharing based on graph state protocols. We give a lower bound on $k$ for the existence of a $((k,n))_q$ scheme and prove, using probabilistic methods, that there exists $\alpha$ such that a random multigraph has an accessing parameter $k\leq \alpha n$ with high probability.
  • In this paper, building on some recent progress combined with numerical techniques, we shed some new light on how the nonlocality of symmetric states is related to their entanglement properties and potential usefulness in quantum information processing. We use semidefinite programming techniques to devise a device independent classification of three four qubit states into two classes inequivalent under local unitaries and permutation of systems (LUP). We study nonlocal properties when the number of parties grows large for two important classes of symmetric states: the W states and the GHZ states, showing that they behave differently under the inequalities we consider. We also discuss the monogamy arising from the nonlocal correlations of symmetric states. We show that although monogamy in a strict sense is not guaranteed for all symmetric states, strict monogamy is achievable for all Dicke states when the number of parties goes to infinity, as shown by an inequality based on a recent work studying the nonlocality (and showing strict monogamy) of W states.
  • In this paper we study the non-local properties of permutation symmetric states of n-qubits. We extend the bipartite Hardy paradox and the associated CH-inequality to n-party permutation symmetric states to show that all symmetric states exhibit non-locality. Natural extensions of both the paradoxes and the inequalities are developed which relate different entanglement classes to different non-local features. We define inequalities which are violated by all states of one entanglement class, whereas there are states outside that class which do not violate.
  • We consider three broad classes of quantum secret sharing with and without eavesdropping and show how a graph state formalism unifies otherwise disparate quantum secret sharing models. In addition to the elegant unification provided by graph states, our approach provides a generalization of threshold classical secret sharing via insecure quantum channels beyond the current requirement of 100% collaboration by players to just a simple majority in the case of five players. Another innovation here is the introduction of embedded protocols within a larger graph state that serves as a one-way quantum information processing system.
  • We present a unified formalism for threshold quantum secret sharing using graph states of systems with prime dimension. We construct protocols for three varieties of secret sharing: with classical and quantum secrets shared between parties over both classical and quantum channels.
  • The geometric measure of entanglement is investigated for permutation symmetric pure states of multipartite qubit systems, in particular the question of maximum entanglement. This is done with the help of the Majorana representation, which maps an n qubit symmetric state to n points on the unit sphere. It is shown how symmetries of the point distribution can be exploited to simplify the calculation of entanglement and also help find the maximally entangled symmetric state. Using a combination of analytical and numerical results, the most entangled symmetric states for up to 12 qubits are explored and discussed. The optimization problem on the sphere presented here is then compared with two classical optimization problems on the S^2 sphere, namely Toth's problem and Thomson's problem, and it is observed that, in general, they are different problems.
  • Permutation-symmetric quantum states appear in a variety of physical situations, and they have been proposed for quantum information tasks. This article builds upon the results of [New J. Phys. 12, 073025 (2010)], where the maximally entangled symmetric states of up to twelve qubits were explored, and their amount of geometric entanglement determined by numeric and analytic means. For this the Majorana representation, a generalization of the Bloch sphere representation, can be employed to represent symmetric n qubit states by n points on the surface of a unit sphere. Symmetries of this point distribution simplify the determination of the entanglement, and enable the study of quantum states in novel ways. Here it is shown that the duality relationship of Platonic solids has a counterpart in the Majorana representation, and that in general maximally entangled symmetric states neither correspond to anticoherent spin states nor to spherical designs. The usability of symmetric states as resources for measurement-based quantum computing is also discussed.
  • In this article we extend on work which establishes an analology between one-way quantum computation and thermodynamics to see how the former can be performed on fractal lattices. We find fractals lattices of arbitrary dimension greater than one which do all act as good resources for one-way quantum computation, and sets of fractal lattices with dimension greater than one all of which do not. The difference is put down to other topological factors such as ramification and connectivity. This work adds confidence to the analogy and highlights new features to what we require for universal resources for one-way quantum computation.
  • In this paper for a class of symmetric multiparty pure states we consider a conjecture related to the geometric measure of entanglement: 'for a symmetric pure state, the closest product state in terms of the fidelity can be chosen as a symmetric product state'. We show that this conjecture is true for symmetric pure states whose amplitudes are all non-negative in a computational basis. The more general conjecture is still open.
  • The entangled graph states have emerged as an elegant and powerful quantum resource, indeed almost all multiparty protocols can be written in terms of graph states including measurement based quantum computation (MBQC), error correction and secret sharing amongst others. In addition they are at the forefront in terms of implementations. As such they represent an excellent opportunity to move towards integrated protocols involving many of these elements. In this paper we look at expressing and extending graph state secret sharing and MBQC in a common framework and graphical language related to flow. We do so with two main contributions. First we express in entirely graphical terms which set of players can access which information in graph state secret sharing protocols. These succinct graphical descriptions of access allow us to take known results from graph theory to make statements on the generalisation of the previous schemes to present new secret sharing protocols. Second, we give a set of necessary conditions as to when a graph with flow, i.e. capable of performing a class of unitary operations, can be extended to include vertices which can be ignored, pointless measurements, and hence considered as unauthorised players in terms of secret sharing, or error qubits in terms of fault tolerance. This offers a way to extend existing MBQC patterns to secret sharing protocols. Our characterisation of pointless measurements is believed also to be a useful tool for further integrated measurement based schemes, for example in constructing fault tolerant MBQC schemes.