• Quasar accretion disk winds observed via broad absorption lines (BALs) in the UV produce strong continuous absorption in X-rays. The X-ray absorber is believed to serve critically as a radiative shield to enable radiative driving. However, "mini-BAL" and narrow absorption line outflows have dramatically less X-ray absorption than BALs. Here we examine X-ray and rest-frame UV spectra of 8 mini-BAL quasars with outflow speeds in the range 0.1c to 0.2c to test whether extreme speeds require a strong shield. We find that the X-ray absorption is weak or moderate, with neutral-equivalent column densities N_H < few times 10^22 cm^-2, consistent with mini-BALs at lower speeds. We use photoionization models to show that this amount of shielding is too weak to control the outflow ionizations and, therefore, it is not important for the acceleration. Shielding in complex geometries also seems unlikely because the alleged shield would need to extinguish the ionizing far-UV flux while avoiding detection in X-rays and the near-UV. We argue that the outflow ionizations are kept moderate, instead, by high gas densities in small clouds. If the mini-BALs form at radial distances of order R ~ 2 pc from the central quasar (broadly consistent with theoretical models and with the mini-BAL variabilities observed here and in previous work), and the total column densities in the mini-BAL gas are N_H ~< 10^21 cm^-2, then the total radial extent of outflow clouds is only Delta-R_clouds ~< 3 x 10^13 cm and the radial filling factor is Delta-R_clouds/R ~< 5 x 10^-6 for weak/negligible shielding. Compared to the transverse sizes >~ 8 x 10^15 cm (based on measured line depths), the outflows have shapes like thin "pancakes" viewed face-on, or they occupy larger volumes like a spray of many dense clouds with a small volume filling factor. These results favor models with magnetic confinement in magnetic disk winds.
  • We describe two studies designed to characterize the total column densities, kinetic energies, and acceleration physics of broad absorption line (BAL) outflows in quasars. The first study uses new Chandra X-ray and ground-based rest-frame UV observations of 7 quasars with mini-BALs at extreme high speeds, in the range 0.1c to 0.2c, to test the idea that strong radiative shielding is needed to moderate the mini-BAL ionizations and facilitate their acceleration to extreme speeds. We find that the X-ray absorption is weak or absent, with generally N_H < few x 10^22 mc^-2, and that radiative shielding is not important. We argue that the mini-BAL ionizations are controlled, instead, by high gas densities of order n_H ~ 4 x 10^8 cm^-3 in small outflow substructures. If we conservatively assume that the total column density in the mini-BAL gas is N_H < 10^22 cm^-2, covering >15% of the UV continuum source along our lines of sight (based on measured line depths), then the radial thickness of these outflows is only Delta_R < 3 x 10^13 cm and their transverse size is > 8 x 10^15 cm. Thus the outflow regions have the shape of very thin "pancakes" viewed face-on, or they occupy larger volumes like a spray of dense cloudlets with a very small volume filling factor. We speculate that this situation (with ineffective shielding and small dense outflow substructures) applies to most quasar outflows, including BALs. Our second study focuses from BALs of low-abundance ions, mainly PV 1118,1128 A, whose significant strengths imply large column densities, N_H > 10^22 cm^-2, that can further challenge models of the outflow acceleration. In spite of the difficulties of finding this line in the Ly-alpha forest, a search through the SDSS DR9 quasar catalog reveals >50 BAL sources at redshifts z>2.3 with strong PV BALs, which we are now using to characterize the general properties of high-column outflows.
  • We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]<-20.5 (in a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology with H0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, $\Omega_{\rm M}$ = 0.3, and $\Omega_{\Lambda}$ = 0.7) and either display at least one emission line with full width at half maximum (FWHM) larger than 500 km/s or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. It includes as well, known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. This catalog contains 87,822 quasars (78,086 are new discoveries) detected over 3,275 deg$^{2}$ with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra newly derived from a training set of 8,632 spectra from SDSS-DR7. The number of quasars with $z>2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.
  • Narrow absorption line (NAL) outflows are an important yet poorly understood part of the quasar outflow phenomenon. We discuss one particular NAL outflow that has high speeds, time variability, and moderate ionizations like typical BAL flows, at an estimated location just ~5 pc from the quasar. It also has a total column density and line widths (internal velocity dispersions) ~100 times smaller than BALs, with no substantial X-ray absorption. We argue that radiative shielding (in the form of an X-ray/warm absorber) is not critical for the outflow acceleration and that the moderate ionizations occur in dense substructures that have an overall small volume filling factor in the flow. We also present new estimates of the overall incidence of quasar outflow lines; e.g., ~43% of bright quasars have a C IV NAL outflow while ~68% have a C IV outflow line of any variety (NAL, BAL, or mini-BAL).
  • We report the results of several programs to study the variability of high-velocity (up to 0.2c) mini-"broad absorption lines" (mini-BALs) and BALs in quasar spectra, and thus to better characterize the structural and physical properties of these outflows. After the report of a highly variable mini-BAL outflow at a speed of ~0.17c in the quasar PG0935+417, we created the first systematic accounting of outflows in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar spectra that includes mini-BALs and extremely high velocity outflows (up to 0.2c) to measure their frequency. Following this study, we began a monitoring campaign to study the location, and dynamical and evolutionary effects of these outflows. This program covers a range of 0.9-3.3 years in the quasars' rest-frame by comparing new spectra (using facilities at the Kitt Peak National Observatory and MDM Observatory) with archival SDSS spectra. We find that ~57% of quasars with mini-BALs and BALs varied between just two observations. This variability tends to occur in complex ways; however, all the variable lines vary in intensity and not in velocity, not finding evidence for acceleration/deceleration in these outflows. Due to the variations in strength, mini-BALs can become BALs and vice versa, suggesting they share a similar nature. We include as an example the discovery of the transition of a mini-BAL into a BAL in the spectra of the SDSS quasar J115122+020426.