• We present a new method for photometering objects in galaxy clusters. We introduce a mode-filtering technique for removing spatially variable backgrounds, improving both detection and photometric accuracy (roughly halving the scatter in the red sequence compared to previous catalogs of the same clusters). This method is based on robustly determining the distribution of background pixel values and should provide comparable improvement in photometric analysis of any crowded fields. We produce new multiwavelength catalogs for the 25 CLASH cluster fields in all 16 bandpasses from the UV through the near IR, as well as rest-frame magnitudes. A comparison with spectroscopic values from the literature finds a ~30% decrease in the redshift deviation from previously-released CLASH photometry. This improvement in redshift precision, in combination with a detection scheme designed to maximize purity, yields a substantial upgrade in cluster member identification over the previous CLASH galaxy catalog. We construct luminosity functions for each cluster, reliably reaching depths of at least 4.5 mag below M* in every case, and deeper still in several clusters. We measure M* , $\alpha$, and their redshift evolution, assuming the cluster populations are coeval, and find little to no evolution of $\alpha$, $-0.9\lesssim\langle\alpha\rangle\lesssim -0.8$, and M* values consistent with passive evolution. We present a catalog of galaxy photometry, photometric and spectroscopic redshifts, and rest-frame photometry for the full fields of view of all 25 CLASH clusters. Not only will our new photometric catalogs enable new studies of the properties of CLASH clusters, but mode-filtering techniques, such as those presented here, should greatly enhance the data quality of future photometric surveys of crowded fields.
  • Here we explore the evolution of galaxy ensembles at early times by writing the in situ stellar mass growth of galaxies purely as a stationary stochastic (e.g., quasi-steady state) process. By combining the mathematics of such processes with Newtonian gravity and a mean local star formation efficiency, we show that the stellar mass evolution of galaxy ensembles is directly related to the average acceleration of baryons onto dark matter halos at the onset of star formation, with explicit dependencies on initial local matter densities and halo mass. The density term specifically implies more rapid average rates of growth in higher density regions of the universe compared to low density regions, i.e., assembly bias. With this framework, using standard cosmological parameters, a mean star formation efficiency derived by other authors, and knowledge of the shape of the cosmological matter power spectrum at small scales, we analytically derive (1) the characteristic stellar masses of galaxies (M*), (2) the power-law low-mass slope (alpha) and normalization (phi*) of the stellar mass function, and (3) the evolution of the stellar mass function in time over 12.5 > z > 2. Correspondingly, the rise in the cosmic star formation rate density over these epochs, while the universe can sustain unabated fueling of star formation, also emerges naturally. All of our findings are consistent with the deepest available data, including the expectation of alpha~-7/5; i.e., a stellar mass function low-mass slope that is notably shallower than that of the halo mass function, and with no systematic deviations from a mean star formation efficiency with density or mass, nor any explicit, additional feedback mechanisms. These derivations yield a compelling richness and complexity but also show that very few astrophysical details are required to understand the evolution of cosmic ensemble of galaxies at early times.
  • The FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) is a 45 night legacy program with the FourStar near-infrared camera on Magellan and one of the most sensitive surveys to date. ZFOURGE covers a total of $400\ \mathrm{arcmin}^2$ in cosmic fields CDFS, COSMOS and UDS, overlapping CANDELS. We present photometric catalogs comprising $>70,000$ galaxies, selected from ultradeep $K_s$-band detection images ($25.5-26.5$ AB mag, $5\sigma$, total), and $>80\%$ complete to $K_s<25.3-25.9$ AB. We use 5 near-IR medium-bandwidth filters ($J_1,J_2,J_3,H_s,H_l$) as well as broad-band $K_s$ at $1.05\ - 2.16\ \mu m$ to $25-26$ AB at a seeing of $\sim0.5$". Each field has ancillary imaging in $26-40$ filters at $0.3-8\ \mu m$. We derive photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Comparing with spectroscopic redshifts indicates a photometric redshift uncertainty $\sigma_z={0.010,0.009}$, and 0.011 in CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS. As spectroscopic samples are often biased towards bright and blue sources, we also inspect the photometric redshift differences between close pairs of galaxies, finding $\sigma_{z,pairs}= 0.01-0.02$ at $1<z<2.5$. We quantify how $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ depends on redshift, magnitude, SED type, and the inclusion of FourStar medium bands. $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ is smallest for bright, blue star-forming samples, while red star-forming galaxies have the worst $\sigma_{z,pairs}$. Including FourStar medium bands reduces $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ by 50\% at $1.5<z<2.5$. We calculate SFRs based on ultraviolet and ultradeep far-IR $Spitzer$/MIPS and Herschel/PACS data. We derive rest-frame $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors, and illustrate how these correlate with specific SFR and dust emission to $z=3.5$. We confirm the existence of quiescent galaxies at $z\sim3$, demonstrating their SFRs are suppressed by $>\times15$.
  • We measure the evolution of the quiescent fraction and quenching efficiency of satellites around star-forming and quiescent central galaxies with stellar mass $\log(M_{\mathrm{cen}}/M_{\odot})>10.5$ at $0.3<z<2.5$. We combine imaging from three deep near-infrared-selected surveys (ZFOURGE/CANDELS, UDS, and UltraVISTA), which allows us to select a stellar-mass complete sample of satellites with $\log(M_{\mathrm{sat}}/M_{\odot})>9.3$. Satellites for both star-forming and quiescent central galaxies have higher quiescent fractions compared to field galaxies matched in stellar mass at all redshifts. We also observe "galactic conformity": satellites around quiescent centrals are more likely to be quenched compared to the satellites around star-forming centrals. In our sample, this conformity signal is significant at $\gtrsim3\sigma$ for $0.6<z<1.6$, whereas it is only weakly significant at $0.3<z<0.6$ and $1.6<z<2.5$. Therefore, conformity (and therefore satellite quenching) has been present for a significant fraction of the age of the universe. The satellite quenching efficiency increases with increasing stellar mass of the central, but does not appear to depend on the stellar mass of the satellite to the mass limit of our sample. When we compare the satellite quenching efficiency of star-forming centrals with stellar masses 0.2 dex higher than quiescent centrals (which should account for any difference in halo mass), the conformity signal decreases, but remains statistically significant at $0.6<z<0.9$. This is evidence that satellite quenching is connected to the star-formation properties of the central as well as to the mass of the halo. We discuss physical effects that may contribute to galactic conformity, and emphasize that they must allow for continued star-formation in the central galaxy even as the satellites are quenched.
  • We report on our first set of spectroscopic Hubble Space Telescope observations of the z~11 candidate galaxy strongly lensed by the MACSJ0647.7+7015 galaxy cluster. The three lensed images are faint and we show that these early slitless grism observations are of sufficient depth to investigate whether this high-redshift candidate, identified by its strong photometric break at ~1.5 micron, could possibly be an emission line galaxy at a much lower redshift. While such an interloper would imply the existence of a rather peculiar object, we show here that such strong emission lines would clearly have been detected. Comparing realistic, two-dimensional simulations to these new observations we would expect the necessary emission lines to be detected at >5 sigma while we see no evidence for such lines in the dispersed data of any of the three lensed images. We therefore exclude that this object could be a low redshift emission line interloper, which significantly increases the likelihood of this candidate being a bona fide z~11 galaxy.
  • Since z~1, the stellar mass density locked in low mass groups and clusters has grown by a factor of ~8. Here we make the first statistical measurements of the stellar mass content of low mass X-ray groups at 0.5<z<1, enabling the calibration of stellar-to-halo mass scales for wide-field optical and infrared surveys. Groups are selected from combined Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). These ultra-deep observations allow us to identify bona fide low mass groups at high redshift and enable measurements of their total halo masses. We compute aggregate stellar masses for these halos using galaxies from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) spectroscopic redshift survey. Stars comprise ~3-4% of the total mass of group halos with masses 10^{12.8}<M200/Msun<10^{13.5} (about the mass of Fornax and 1/50th the mass of Virgo). Complementing our sample with higher mass halos at these redshifts, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass ratio decreases toward higher halo masses, consistent with other work in the local and high redshift universe. The observed scatter about the stellar-halo mass relation is ~0.25 dex, which is relatively small and suggests that total group stellar mass can serve as a rough proxy for halo mass. We find no evidence for any significant evolution in the stellar-halo mass relation since z<1. Quantifying the stellar content in groups since this epoch is critical given that hierarchical assembly leads to such halos growing in number density and hosting increasing shares of quiescent galaxies.
  • The deflection angles of lensed sources increase with their distance behind a given lens. We utilize this geometric effect to corroborate the $z_{phot}\simeq9.8$ photometric redshift estimate of a faint near-IR dropout, triply-imaged by the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 in deep Hubble Frontier Fields images. The multiple images of this source follow the same symmetry as other nearby sets of multiple images which bracket the critical curves and have well defined redshifts (up to $z_{spec}\simeq3.6$), but with larger deflection angles, indicating that this source must lie at a higher redshift. Similarly, our different parametric and non-parametric lens models all require this object be at $z\gtrsim4$, with at least 95\% confidence, thoroughly excluding the possibility of lower-redshift interlopers. To study the properties of this source we correct the two brighter images for their magnifications, leading to a SFR of $\sim0.3 M_{\odot}$/yr, a stellar mass of $\sim4\times10^{7} M_{\odot}$, and an age of $\lesssim220$ Myr (95\% confidence). The intrinsic apparent magnitude is 29.9 AB (F160W), and the rest-frame UV ($\sim1500 \AA$) absolute magnitude is $M_{UV,AB}=-17.6$. This corresponds to $\sim0.1 L^{*}_{z=8}$ ($\sim0.2 L^{*}_{z=10}$, adopting $dM^{*}/dz\sim0.45$), making this candidate one of the least luminous galaxies discovered at $z\sim10$.
  • Our understanding of the redshift $z>3$ galaxy population relies largely on samples selected using the popular "dropout" technique, typically consisting of UV-bright galaxies with blue colors and prominent Lyman breaks. As it is currently unknown if these galaxies are representative of the massive galaxy population, we here use the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) Survey to create a stellar mass-limited sample at $z=3-4$. Uniquely, ZFOURGE uses deep near-infrared medium-bandwidth filters to derive accurate photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. The mass-complete sample consists of 57 galaxies with log M $>10.6$, reaching below $M^{\star}$ at $z=3-4$. On average, the massive $z=3-4$ galaxies are extremely faint in the observed optical with median $R_{tot}^{AB}=27.48\pm0.41$ (restframe $M_{1700}=-18.05\pm0.37$). They lie far below the UV luminosity-stellar mass relation for Lyman break galaxies and are about $\sim100\times$ fainter at the same mass. The massive galaxies are red ($R-Ks_{AB}=3.9\pm0.2$; restframe UV-slope $\beta=-0.2\pm0.3$) likely from dust or old stellar ages. We classify the galaxy SEDs by their restframe $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors and find a diverse population: $46^{+6+10}_{-6-17}$% of the massive galaxies are quiescent, $54^{+8+17}_{-8-10}$% are dusty star-forming galaxies, and only $14^{+3+10}_{-3-4}$% resemble luminous blue star forming Lyman break galaxies. This study clearly demonstrates an inherent diversity among massive galaxies at higher redshift than previously known. Furthermore,we uncover a reservoir of dusty star-forming galaxies with $4\times$ lower specific star-formation rates compared to submillimeter-selected starbursts at $z>3$. With $5\times$ higher numbers, the dusty galaxies may represent a more typical mode of star formation compared to submillimeter-bright starbursts.
  • We present radial velocities, equivalent widths, model atmosphere parameters, and abundances or upper limits for 53 species of 48 elements derived from high resolution optical spectroscopy of 313 metal-poor stars. A majority of these stars were selected from the metal-poor candidates of the HK Survey of Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We derive detailed abundances for 61% of these stars for the first time. Spectra were obtained during a 10-year observing campaign using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, the Robert G. Tull Coude Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory, and the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We perform a standard LTE abundance analysis using MARCS model atmospheres, and we apply line-by-line statistical corrections to minimize systematic abundance differences arising when different sets of lines are available for analysis. We identify several abundance correlations with effective temperature. A comparison with previous abundance analyses reveals significant differences in stellar parameters, which we investigate in detail. Our metallicities are, on average, lower by approx. 0.25 dex for red giants and approx. 0.04 dex for subgiants. Our sample contains 19 stars with [Fe/H] < -3.5, 84 stars with [Fe/H] < -3.0, and 210 stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5. Detailed abundances are presented here or elsewhere for 91% of the 209 stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5 as estimated from medium resolution spectroscopy by Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We will discuss the interpretation of these abundances in subsequent papers.
  • We report the likely identification of a substantial population of massive M~10^11M_Sun galaxies at z~4 with suppressed star formation rates (SFRs), selected on rest-frame optical to near-IR colors from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey. The observed spectral energy distributions show pronounced breaks, sampled by a set of near-IR medium-bandwidth filters, resulting in tightly constrained photometric redshifts. Fitting stellar population models suggests large Balmer/4000AA breaks, relatively old stellar populations, large stellar masses and low SFRs, with a median specific SFR of 2.9+/-1.8 x 10^-11/yr. Ultradeep Herschel/PACS 100micron, 160micron and Spitzer/MIPS 24micron data reveal no dust-obscured SFR activity for 15/19 (79%) galaxies. Two far-IR detected galaxies are obscured QSOs. Stacking the far-IR undetected galaxies yields no detection, consistent with the SED fit, indicating independently that the average specific SFR is at least 10x smaller than of typical star-forming galaxies at z~4. Assuming all far-IR undetected galaxies are indeed quiescent, the volume density is 1.8+/-0.7 x 10^-5Mpc^-3 to a limit of log10M/M_Sun>10.6, which is 10x and 80x lower than at z = 2 and z = 0.1. They comprise a remarkably high fraction (~35%) of z~4 massive galaxies, suggesting that suppression of star formation was efficient even at very high redshift. Given the average stellar age of 0.8Gyr and stellar mass of 0.8x10^11M_Sun, the galaxies likely started forming stars before z =5, with SFRs well in excess of 100M_Sun/yr, far exceeding that of similarly abundant UV-bright galaxies at z>4. This suggests that most of the star-formation in the progenitors of quiescent z~4 galaxies was obscured by dust.
  • We describe the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) Survey, a wide-field, near-IR selected spectrophotometric redshift survey with IMACS on Magellan-Baade. CSI uses a flux-limited sample of galaxies in Spitzer IRAC 3.6micron imaging of SWIRE fields to efficiently trace the stellar mass of average galaxies to z~1.5. This paper provides an overview of the survey selection, observations, and processing of the photometry and spectrophotometry. We also describe the analysis of the data: new methods of fitting synthetic SEDs are used to derive redshifts, stellar masses, emission line luminosities, and coarse information on recent star-formation. Our unique methodology for analyzing low-dispersion spectra taken with multilayer prisms in IMACS, combined with panchromatic photometry from the ultraviolet to the IR, has yielded high quality redshifts for 43,347 galaxies in our first 5.3 sq. degs of the SWIRE XMM-LSS field. A new approach to assessing data quality is also described, and three different approaches are used to estimate our redshift errors, with robust agreement. Over the full range of 3.6micron fluxes of our selection, we find typical redshift uncertainties of sigma_z/(1+z) < 0.015. In comparisons with previously published spectroscopic redshifts we find scatters of sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.011 for galaxies at 0.7< z< 0.9, and sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.014 for galaxies at 0.9< z< 1.2. For galaxies brighter and fainter than i=23 mag, we find sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.008 and sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.022, respectively. Notably, our low-dispersion spectroscopy and analysis yields comparable redshift uncertainties and success rates for both red and blue galaxies, largely eliminating color-based systematics that can seriously bias observed dependencies of galaxy evolution on environment.
  • Using observations from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE), we obtain the deepest measurements to date of the galaxy stellar mass function at 0.5 < z < 2.5. ZFOURGE provides well-constrained photometric redshifts made possible through deep medium-bandwidth imaging at 1-2um . We combine this with HST imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), allowing for the efficient selection of both blue and red galaxies down to stellar masses ~10^9.5 Msol at z ~ 2.5. The total surveyed area is 316 arcmin^2 distributed over three independent fields. We supplement these data with the wider and shallower NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) to provide stronger constraints at high masses. Several studies at z<=1 have revealed a steepening of the slope at the low-mass end of the stellar mass function (SMF), leading to an upturn at masses <10^10 Msol that is not well-described by a standard single-Schechter function. We find evidence that this feature extends to at least z ~ 2, and that it can be found in both the star-forming and quiescent populations individually. The characteristic mass (M*) and slope at the lowest masses (alpha) of a double-Schechter function fit to the SMF stay roughly constant at Log(M/Msol) ~ 10.65 and ~-1.5 respectively. The SMF of star-forming galaxies has evolved primarily in normalization, while the change in shape is relatively minor. This is not the case for quiescent galaxies: the depth of our imaging allows us to show for the first time significantly more evolution at Log(M/Msol) < 10.5 than at higher masses. We find that the total mass density (down to 10^9 Msol) in star-forming galaxies has increased by a factor of ~2.2 since z ~ 2.5, whereas in quiescent galaxies it has increased by a factor of ~12 .
  • We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z=0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of 4.6e9 M_Sun and a stellar population age of 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z=0.718 with a stellar mass of 1.4e9 M_Sun, a star formation rate of 16 M_Sun yr^-1, and a stellar population age of 50 Myr. We also report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i>26 mag and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. The bursts have inferred circumburst densities of ~1e-4-1 cm^-3, and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of 1e50-1e51 erg. These events highlight the diversity of galaxies that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment (~1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to May 2012) and classify them as follows: late-type (50%), early-type (15%), inconclusive (20%), and host-less (lacking a coincident host galaxy to limits of >26 mag; 15%). To find likely ranges for the true late- and early-type fractions, we assign each of the host-less bursts to the late- or early-type category using probabilistic arguments, and consider the scenario that all hosts in the inconclusive category are early-type galaxies to set an upper bound on the early-type fraction. The most likely ranges for the late- and early-type fractions are ~60-80% and ~20-40%, respectively. We find no clear trend between gamma-ray duration and host type, and no change to the fractions when excluding events recently claimed as possible contaminants from the long GRB/collapsar population. Our reported demographics are consistent with a short GRB rate driven by both stellar mass and star formation.
  • We present the discovery and a detailed multi-wavelength study of a strongly-lensed luminous infrared galaxy at z=0.816. Unlike most known lensed galaxies discovered at optical or near-infrared wavelengths this lensed source is red, r-Ks = 3.9 [AB], which the data presented here demonstrate is due to ongoing dusty star formation. The overall lensing magnification (a factor of 17) facilitates observations from the blue optical through to 500micron, fully capturing both the stellar photospheric emission as well as the re-processed thermal dust emission. We also present optical and near-IR spectroscopy. These extensive data show that this lensed galaxy is in many ways typical of IR-detected sources at z~1, with both a total luminosity and size in accordance with other (albeit much less detailed) measurements in samples of galaxies observed in deep fields with the Spitzer telescope. Its far-infrared spectral energy distribution is well-fit by local templates that are an order of magnitude less luminous than the lensed galaxy; local templates of comparable luminosity are too hot to fit. Its size (D~7kpc) is much larger than local luminous infrared galaxies, but in line with sizes observed for such galaxies at z~1. The star formation appears uniform across this spatial scale. In this source, the luminosity of which is typical of sources that dominate the cosmic infrared background, we find that star formation is spatially extended and well organised, quite unlike the compact merger-driven starbursts which are typical for sources of this luminosity at z~0.
  • We present a candidate for the most distant galaxy known to date with a photometric redshift z = 10.7 +0.6 / -0.4 (95% confidence limits; with z < 9.5 galaxies of known types ruled out at 7.2-sigma). This J-dropout Lyman Break Galaxy, named MACS0647-JD, was discovered as part of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). We observe three magnified images of this galaxy due to strong gravitational lensing by the galaxy cluster MACSJ0647.7+7015 at z = 0.591. The images are magnified by factors of ~8, 7, and 2, with the brighter two observed at ~26th magnitude AB (~0.15 uJy) in the WFC3/IR F160W filter (~1.4 - 1.7 um) where they are detected at >~ 12-sigma. All three images are also confidently detected at >~ 6-sigma in F140W (~1.2 - 1.6 um), dropping out of detection from 15 lower wavelength HST filters (~0.2 - 1.4 um), and lacking bright detections in Spitzer/IRAC 3.6um and 4.5um imaging (~3.2 - 5.0 um). We rule out a broad range of possible lower redshift interlopers, including some previously published as high redshift candidates. Our high redshift conclusion is more conservative than if we had neglected a Bayesian photometric redshift prior. Given CLASH observations of 17 high mass clusters to date, our discoveries of MACS0647-JD at z ~ 10.8 and MACS1149-JD1 at z ~ 9.6 are consistent with a lensed luminosity function extrapolated from lower redshifts. This would suggest that low luminosity galaxies could have reionized the universe. However given the significant uncertainties based on only two galaxies, we cannot yet rule out the sharp drop off in number counts at z >~ 10 suggested by field searches.
  • The early Universe at redshift z\sim6-11 marks the reionization of the intergalactic medium, following the formation of the first generation of stars. However, those young galaxies at a cosmic age of \lesssim 500 million years (Myr, at z \gtrsim 10) remain largely unexplored as they are at or beyond the sensitivity limits of current large telescopes. Gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters enables the detection of high-redshift galaxies that are fainter than what otherwise could be found in the deepest images of the sky. We report the discovery of an object found in the multi-band observations of the cluster MACS1149+22 that has a high probability of being a gravitationally magnified object from the early universe. The object is firmly detected (12 sigma) in the two reddest bands of HST/WFC3, and not detected below 1.2 {\mu}m, matching the characteristics of z\sim9 objects. We derive a robust photometric redshift of z = 9.6 \pm 0.2, corresponding to a cosmic age of 490 \pm 15Myr (i.e., 3.6% of the age of the Universe). The large number of bands used to derive the redshift estimate make it one of the most accurate estimates ever obtained for such a distant object. The significant magnification by cluster lensing (a factor of \sim15) allows us to analyze the object's ultra-violet and optical luminosity in its rest-frame, thus enabling us to constrain on its stellar mass, star-formation rate and age. If the galaxy is indeed at such a large redshift, then its age is less than 200 Myr (at the 95% confidence level), implying a formation redshift of zf \lesssim 14. The object is the first z>9 candidate that is bright enough for detailed spectroscopic studies with JWST, demonstrating the unique potential of galaxy cluster fields for finding highly magnified, intrinsically faint galaxies at the highest redshifts.
  • We report the first results from the Z-FOURGE survey: the discovery of a candidate galaxy cluster at z = 2.2 consisting of two compact overdensities with red galaxies detected at >20{\sigma} above the mean surface density. The discovery was made possible by a new deep (Ks < 24.8 AB 5{\sigma}) Magellan/FourStar near-IR imaging survey with 5 custom medium-bandwidth filters. The filters pinpoint the location of the Balmer/4000\AA\ break in evolved stellar populations at 1.5 < z < 3.5, yielding significantly more accurate photometric redshifts than possible with broadband imaging alone. The overdensities are within 1' of each other in the COSMOS field and appear to be embedded in a larger structure that contains at least one additional overdensity (\sim10{\sigma}). Considering the global properties of the overdensities, the z = 2.2 system appears to be the most distant example of a galaxy cluster with a population of red galaxies. A comparison to a large {\Lambda}CDM simulation suggests that the system may consist of merging subclusters, with properties in between those of z > 2 protoclusters with more diffuse distributions of blue galaxies and the lower-redshift galaxy clusters with prominent red sequences. The structure is completely absent in public optical catalogs in COSMOS and only weakly visible in a shallower near-IR survey. The discovery showcases the potential of deep near-IR surveys with medium-band filters to advance the understanding of environment and galaxy evolution at z > 1.5.
  • We present the first measurement of the evolution of the galaxy group stellar mass function (GrSMF) to redshift z>~1 and low masses (M*>10^12 Msun). Our results are based on early data from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) Survey, utilizing low-resolution spectra and broadband optical/near-IR photometry to measure redshifts for a 3.6um selected sample of 37,000 galaxies over a 5.3 deg^2 area to z~1.2. Employing a standard friends-of-friends algorithm for all galaxies more massive than log(M*/Msun)=10.5, we find a total of ~4000 groups. Correcting for spectroscopic incompleteness (including slit collisions), we build cumulative stellar mass functions for these groups in redshift bins at z>0.35, comparing to the z=0 and z>0 mass functions from various group and cluster samples. Our derived mass functions match up well with z>0.35 X-ray selected clusters, and strong evolution is evident at all masses over the past 8 Gyr. Given the already low level of star formation activity in galaxies at these masses, we therefore attribute most of the observed growth in the GrSMF to group-group and group-galaxy mergers, in accordance with qualitative notions of hierarchical structure formation. Given the factor 3-10 increase in the number density of groups and clusters with M*>10^12 Msun since z=1 and the strong anticorrelation between star formation activity and environmental density, this late-time growth in group-sized halos may therefore be an important contributor to the structural and star-formation evolution of massive galaxies over the past 8 Gyr.
  • We describe the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) Survey, a wide-field, near-IR selected spectrophotometric redshift survey with the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) on Magellan-Baade. By defining a flux-limited sample of galaxies in Spitzer 3.6micron imaging of SWIRE fields, the CSI Survey efficiently traces the stellar mass of average galaxies to z~1.5. This first paper provides an overview of the survey selection, observations, processing of the photometry and spectrophotometry. We also describe the processing of the data: new methods of fitting synthetic templates of spectral energy distributions are used to derive redshifts, stellar masses, emission line luminosities, and coarse information on recent star-formation. Our unique methodology for analyzing low-dispersion spectra taken with multilayer prisms in IMACS, combined with panchromatic photometry from the ultraviolet to the IR, has yielded 37,000 high quality redshifts in our first 5.3 sq.degs of the SWIRE XMM-LSS field. We use three different approaches to estimate our redshift errors and find robust agreement. Over the full range of 3.6micron fluxes of our selection, we find typical uncertainties of sigma_z/(1+z) < 0.015. In comparisons with previously published VVDS redshifts, for example, we find a scatter of sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.012 for galaxies at 0.8< z< 1.2. For galaxies brighter and fainter than i=23 mag, we find sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.009 and sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.025, respectively. Notably, our low-dispersion spectroscopy and analysis yields comparable redshift uncertainties and success rates for both red and blue galaxies, largely eliminating color-based systematics that can seriously bias observed dependencies of galaxy evolution on environment.
  • Clusters of galaxies have long been used as laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, but despite intense, recent interest in feedback between AGNs and their hosts, the impact of environment on these relationships remains poorly constrained. We present results from a study of AGNs and their host galaxies found in low-redshift galaxy clusters. We fit model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to the combined visible and mid-infrared (MIR) photometry of cluster members and use these model SEDs to determine stellar masses and star-formation rates (SFRs). We identify two populations of AGNs, the first based on their X-ray luminosities (X-ray AGNs) and the second based on the presence of a significant AGN component in their model SEDs (IR AGNs). We find that the two AGN populations are nearly disjoint; only 8 out of 44 AGNs are identified with both techniques. We further find that IR AGNs are hosted by galaxies with similar masses and SFRs but higher specific SFRs (sSFRs) than X-ray AGN hosts. The relationship between AGN accretion and host star-formation in cluster AGN hosts shows no significant difference compared to the relationship between field AGNs and their hosts. The projected radial distributions of both AGN populations are consistent with the distribution of other cluster members. We argue that the apparent dichotomy between X-ray and IR AGNs can be understood as a combination of differing extinction due to cold gas in the host galaxies of the two classes of AGNs and the presence of weak star-formation in X-ray AGN hosts.
  • We have measured velocity dispersions for a sample of 36 galaxies with J < 21.2 or Mr < -20.6 mag in MS1054-03, a massive cluster of galaxies at z = 0.83. Our data are of uniformly high quality down to our selection limit, our 16-hour exposures typically yielding errors of only \delta(dispersion)~10% for L* and fainter galaxies. By combining our measurements with data from the literature, we have 53 cluster galaxies with measured dispersions, and HST/ACS-derived sizes, colors and surface brightnesses. This sample is complete for the typical L* galaxy at z~1, unlike most previous z~1 cluster samples which are complete only for the massive cluster members (>1e11 M_sun). We find no evidence for a change in the tilt of the fundamental plane (FP). Nor do we find evidence for evolution in the slope of the color-dispersion relation and M/L_B-dispersion relations; measuring evolution at a fixed dispersion should minimize the impact of size evolution found in other work. The M/L_B at fixed dispersion evolves by \Delta log10 M/L_B=-0.50 +/- 0.03 between z=0.83 and z=0.02 or d(log10 M/L_B)=-0.60 +/- 0.04 dz, and we find \Delta (U-V)_z=-0.24 +/- 0.02 mag at fixed dispersion in the rest-frame, matching the expected evolution in M/L_B within 2.25 standard deviations. The implied formation redshift from both the color and M/L_B evolution is z*=2.0 +/- 0.2 +/- 0.3 (sys), during the epoch in which the cosmic star-formation activity peaked, with the systematic uncertainty showing the dependence of z* on the assumptions we make about the stellar populations. The lack of evolution in either the tilt of the FP or in the M/L- and color-dispersion relations imply that the formation epoch depends weakly on mass, ranging from z*=2.3 +1.3 -0.3 at 300 km/s to z*=1.7 +0.3 -0.2 at 160 km/s and implies that the IMF similarly varies slowly with galaxy mass.
  • Modern population synthesis models estimate that 50% of the restframe K-band light is produced by TP-AGB stars during the first Gyr of a stellar population, with a substantial fraction continuing to be produced by the TP-AGB over a Hubble time. Between 0.2 and 1.5 Gyr, intermediate mass stars evolve into TP-AGB C stars which, due to significant amounts of circumstellar dust, emit half their energy in the mid-IR. We combine these results using published mid-IR colors of Galactic TP-AGB M and C stars to construct simple models for exploring the contribution of the TP-AGB to 24micron data as a function of stellar population age. We compare these empirical models with an ensemble of galaxies in the CDFS from z=0 to z=2, and with high quality imaging in M81. Within the uncertainties, the TP-AGB appears responsible for a substantial fraction of the mid-IR luminosities of galaxies from z=0 to z=2, the maximum redshift to which we can test our hypothesis, while, at the same time, our models reproduce much of the detailed structure observed in mid-IR imaging of M81. The mid-IR is a good diagnostic of star formation over timescales of ~1.5 Gyr, but this implies that on-going star formation rates at z=1 may be overestimated by factors of ~1.5-6, depending on the nature of star formation events. Our results, if confirmed through subsequent work, have strong implications for the star formation rate density of the universe and the growth of stellar mass over time.
  • The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is designed to measure the luminosity distance for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of redshift, and to set observational constraints on the dark energy contribution to the total energy content of the Universe. The CSP differs from other projects to date in its goal of providing an I-band {rest-frame} Hubble diagram. Here we present the first results from near-infrared (NIR) observations obtained using the Magellan Baade telescope for SNe Ia with 0.1 < z < 0.7. We combine these results with those from the low-redshift CSP at z <0.1 (Folatelli et al. 2009). We present light curves and an I-band Hubble diagram for this first sample of 35 SNe Ia and we compare these data to 21 new SNe Ia at low redshift. These data support the conclusion that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. When combined with independent results from baryon acoustic oscillations (Eisenstein et al. 2005), these data yield Omega_m = 0.27 +/- 0.0 (statistical), and Omega_DE = 0.76 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic), for the matter and dark energy densities, respectively. If we parameterize the data in terms of an equation of state, w, assume a flat geometry, and combine with baryon acoustic oscillations, we find that w = -1.05 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic). The largest source of systematic uncertainty on w arises from uncertainties in the photometric calibration, signaling the importance of securing more accurate photometric calibrations for future supernova cosmology programs. Finally, we conclude that either the dust affecting the luminosities of SNe Ia has a different extinction law (R_V = 1.8) than that in the Milky Way (where R_V = 3.1), or that there is an additional intrinsic color term with luminosity for SNe Ia independent of the decline rate.
  • The initial-final mass relation represents a mapping between the mass of a white dwarf remnant and the mass that the hydrogen burning main-sequence star that created it once had. The relation thus far has been constrained using a sample of ~40 stars in young open clusters, ranging in initial mass from ~2.75 -- 7 Msun, and shows a general trend that connects higher mass main-sequence stars with higher mass white dwarfs. In this paper, we present CFHT/CFH12K photometric and Keck/LRIS multiobject spectroscopic observations of a sample of 22 white dwarfs in two older open clusters, NGC 7789 (t = 1.4 Gyr) and NGC 6819 (t = 2.5 Gyr). We measure masses for the highest S/N spectra by fitting the Balmer lines to atmosphere models and place the first direct constraints on the low mass end of the initial-final mass relation. Our results indicate that the observed general trend at higher masses continues down to low masses, with M_initial = 1.16 Msun main-sequence stars forming M_final = 0.53 Msun white dwarfs (including our data from the very old open cluster, NGC 6791). This extention of the relation represents a four fold increase in the total number of hydrogen burning stars for which the integrated mass loss can now be calculated, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function. The new leverage at the low mass end is used to derive a purely empirical initial-final mass relation without the need for any indirectly derived anchor points. The sample of white dwarfs in these clusters also shows several very interesting systems that we discuss further: a DB (helium atmosphere) white dwarf, a magnetic white dwarf, a DAB (mixed hydrogen/helium atmosphere or a double degenerate DA+DB) white dwarf(s), and two possible equal mass DA double degenerate binary systems.
  • We present the first detailed study of the properties (temperatures, gravities, and masses) of the NGC 6791 white dwarf population. This unique stellar system is both one of the oldest (8 Gyr) and most metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ 0.4) open clusters in our Galaxy, and has a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) that exhibits both a red giant clump and a much hotter extreme horizontal branch. Fitting the Balmer lines of the white dwarfs in the cluster, using Keck/LRIS spectra, suggests that most of these stars are undermassive, <M> = 0.43 +/- 0.06 Msun, and therefore could not have formed from canonical stellar evolution involving the helium flash at the tip of the red giant branch. We show that at least 40% of NGC 6791's evolved stars must have lost enough mass on the red giant branch to avoid the flash, and therefore did not convert helium into carbon-oxygen in their core. Such increased mass loss in the evolution of the progenitors of these stars is consistent with the presence of the extreme horizontal branch in the CMD. This unique stellar evolutionary channel also naturally explains the recent finding of a very young age (2.4 Gyr) for NGC 6791 from white dwarf cooling theory; helium core white dwarfs in this cluster will cool ~3 times slower than carbon-oxygen core stars and therefore the corrected white dwarf cooling age is in fact ~7 Gyr, consistent with the well measured main-sequence turnoff age. These results provide direct empirical evidence that mass loss is much more efficient in high metallicity environments and therefore may be critical in interpreting the ultraviolet upturn in elliptical galaxies.