• Proxima Centauri has become the subject of intense study since the radial-velocity discovery by Anglada-Escud\'e et al. 2016 of a planet orbiting this nearby M-dwarf every ~ 11.2 days. If Proxima Centauri b transits its host star, independent confirmation of its existence is possible, and its mass and radius can be measured in units of the stellar host mass and radius. To date, there have been three independent claims of possible transit-like event detections in light curve observations obtained by the MOST satellite (in 2014-15), the BSST telescope in Antarctica (in 2016), and the Las Campanas Observatory (in 2016). The claimed possible detections are tentative, due in part to the variability intrinsic to the host star, and in the case of the ground-based observations, also due to the limited duration of the light curve observations. Here, we present preliminary results from an extensive photometric monitoring campaign of Proxima Centauri, using telescopes around the globe and spanning from 2006 to 2017, comprising a total of 329 observations. Considering our data that coincide directly and/or phased with the previously published tentative transit detections, we are unable to independently verify those claims. We do, however, verify the previously reported ubiquitous and complex variability of the host star. We discuss possible interpretations of the data in light of the previous claims, and we discuss future analyses of these data that could more definitively verify or refute the presence of transits associated with the radial-velocity discovered planet.
  • We report the discovery of KELT-10b, the first transiting exoplanet discovered using the KELT-South telescope. KELT-10b is a highly inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting a relatively bright $V = 10.7$ star (TYC 8378-64-1), with T$_{eff}$ = $5948\pm74$ K, $\log{g}$ = $4.319_{-0.030}^{+0.020}$ and [Fe/H] = $0.09_{-0.10}^{+0.11}$, an inferred mass M$_{*}$ = $1.112_{-0.061}^{+0.055}$ M$_{\odot}$ and radius R$_{*}$ = $1.209_{-0.035}^{+0.047}$ R$_{\odot}$. The planet has a radius R$_{P}$ = $1.399_{-0.049}^{+0.069}$ R$_{J}$ and mass M$_{P}$ = $0.679_{-0.038}^{+0.039}$ M$_{J}$. The planet has an eccentricity consistent with zero and a semi-major axis $a$ = $0.05250_{-0.00097}^{+0.00086}$ AU. The best fitting linear ephemeris is $T_{0}$ = 2457066.72045$\pm$0.00027 BJD$_{TDB}$ and P = 4.1662739$\pm$0.0000063 days. This planet joins a group of highly inflated transiting exoplanets with a radius much larger and a mass much less than those of Jupiter. The planet, which boasts deep transits of 1.4%, has a relatively high equilibrium temperature of T$_{eq}$ = $1377_{-23}^{+28}$ K, assuming zero albedo and perfect heat redistribution. KELT-10b receives an estimated insolation of $0.817_{-0.054}^{+0.068}$ $\times$ 10$^9$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, which places it far above the insolation threshold above which hot Jupiters exhibit increasing amounts of radius inflation. Evolutionary analysis of the host star suggests that KELT-10b is unlikely to survive beyond the current subgiant phase, due to a concomitant in-spiral of the planet over the next $\sim$1 Gyr. The planet transits a relatively bright star and exhibits the third largest transit depth of all transiting exoplanets with V $<$ 11 in the southern hemisphere, making it a promising candidate for future atmospheric characterization studies.
  • Aims. We present and study the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2010ev. Methods. We obtain and analyze multi-band optical light curves and optical-near-infrared spectroscopy at low and medium resolution spanning from -7 days to +300 days from the B-band maximum. Results. A photometric analysis shows that SN 2010ev is a SN Ia of normal brightness with a light curve shape of $\Delta m_{15}(B)=1.12 \pm 0.02$ and a stretch s = $0.94 \pm 0.01$ suffering significant reddening. From photometric and spectroscopic analysis, we deduce a color excess of $E(B - V) = 0.25 \pm 0.05$ and a reddening law of $R_v = 1.54 \pm 0.65$. Spectroscopically, SN 2010ev belongs to the broad-line SN Ia group, showing stronger than average Si II {\lambda}6355 absorption features. We also find that SN 2010ev is a high-velocity gradient SN, with a value of $164 \pm 7$ km s$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$. The photometric and spectral comparison with other supernovae shows that SN 2010ev has similar colors and velocities to SN 2002bo and SN 2002dj. The analysis of the nebular spectra indicates that the [Fe II] {\lambda}7155 and [Ni II] {\lambda}7378 lines are redshifted, as expected for a high velocity gradient supernova. All these common intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the high velocity gradient (HVG) group are different from the low velocity gradient (LVG) normal SN Ia population and suggest significant variety in SN Ia explosions.
  • The final assembly of terrestrial planets occurs via massive collisions, which can launch copious clouds of dust that are warmed by the star and glow in the infrared. We report the real-time detection of a debris-producing impact in the terrestrial planet zone around a 35-million year-old solar analog star. We observed a substantial brightening of the debris disk at 3-5 {\mu}m, followed by a decay over a year, with quasi-periodic modulations of the disk flux. The behavior is consistent with the occurrence of a violent impact that produced vapor out of which a thick cloud of silicate spherules condensed that were ground into dust by collisions. These results demonstrate how the time domain can become a new dimension for the study of terrestrial planet formation.
  • Luminous debris disks of warm dust in the terrestrial planet zones around solar-like stars are recently found to vary, indicative of ongoing large-scale collisions of rocky objects. We use Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {\mu}m time-series observations in 2012 and 2013 (extended to 2014 in one case) to monitor 5 more debris disks with unusually high fractional luminosities ("extreme debris disk"), including P1121 in the open cluster M47 (80 Myr), HD 15407A in the AB Dor moving group (80 Myr), HD 23514 in the Pleiades (120 Myr), HD 145263 in the Upper Sco Association (10 Myr), and the field star BD+20 307 (>1 Gyr). Together with the published results for ID8 in NGC 2547 (35 Myr), this makes the first systematic time-domain investigation of planetary impacts outside the solar system. Significant variations with timescales shorter than a year are detected in five out of the six extreme debris disks we have monitored. However, different systems show diverse sets of characteristics in the time domain, including long-term decay or growth, disk temperature variations, and possible periodicity.
  • We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope (SE) supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities, such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution, place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name "flat-velocity Type IIb". The flat velocity evolution---which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km/s for different SNe---suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival HST images we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ~6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modelling, on the contrary, indicates the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, of ~4 M_sol. The seeming contradiction between an young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.
  • We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum luminosity is only about half as large as that of SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a GRB clearly associated with a massive star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be \Gamma ~ 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of \Gamma > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.
  • We present the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the nearby (z = 0.059) spectroscopically confirmed type Ic supernova, SN 2010bh, associated with the soft, long-duration gamma-ray burst (X-ray flash) GRB 100316D. Intensive follow-up observations of SN 2010bh were performed at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the X-shooter and FORS2 instruments. Owing to the detailed temporal coverage and the extended wavelength range (3000--24800 A), we obtained an unprecedentedly rich spectral sequence among the hypernovae, making SN 2010bh one of the best studied representatives of this SN class. We find that SN 2010bh has a more rapid rise to maximum brightness (8.0 +/- 1.0 rest-frame days) and a fainter absolute peak luminosity (L_bol~3e42 erg/s) than previously observed SN events associated with GRBs. Our estimate of the ejected (56)Ni mass is 0.12 +/- 0.02 Msun. From the broad spectral features we measure expansion velocities up to 47,000 km/s, higher than those of SNe 1998bw (GRB 980425) and 2006aj (GRB 060218). Helium absorption lines He I lambda5876 and He I 1.083 microm, blueshifted by ~20,000--30,000 km/s and ~28,000--38,000 km/s, respectively, may be present in the optical spectra. However, the lack of coverage of the He I 2.058 microm line prevents us from confirming such identifications. The nebular spectrum, taken at ~186 days after the explosion, shows a broad but faint [O I] emission at 6340 A. The light-curve shape and photospheric expansion velocities of SN 2010bh suggest that we witnessed a highly energetic explosion with a small ejected mass (E_k ~ 1e52 erg and M_ej ~ 3 Msun). The observed properties of SN 2010bh further extend the heterogeneity of the class of GRB supernovae.
  • We present the first maximum-light ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectrum. This spectrum of SN 2011iv was obtained nearly simultaneously by the Hubble Space Telescope at UV/optical wavelengths and the Magellan Baade telescope at NIR wavelengths. These data provide the opportunity to examine the entire maximum-light SN Ia spectral-energy distribution. Since the UV region of a SN Ia spectrum is extremely sensitive to the composition of the outer layers of the explosion, which are transparent at longer wavelengths, this unprecedented spectrum can provide strong constraints on the composition of the SN ejecta, and similarly the SN explosion and progenitor system. SN 2011iv is spectroscopically normal, but has a relatively fast decline (Delta m_15 (B) = 1.69 +/- 0.05 mag). We compare SN 2011iv to other SNe Ia with UV spectra near maximum light and examine trends between UV spectral properties, light-curve shape, and ejecta velocity. We tentatively find that SNe with similar light-curve shapes but different ejecta velocities have similar UV spectra, while those with similar ejecta velocities but different light-curve shapes have very different UV spectra. Through a comparison with explosion models, we find that both a solar-metallicity W7 and a zero-metallicity delayed-detonation model provide a reasonable fit to the spectrum of SN 2011iv from the UV to the NIR.
  • The eruption of the recurrent nova U Scorpii on 28 January 2010 is now the all-time best observed nova event. We report 36,776 magnitudes throughout its 67 day eruption, for an average of one measure every 2.6 minutes. This unique and unprecedented coverage is the first time that a nova has any substantial amount of fast photometry. With this, two new phenomena have been discovered: the fast flares in the early light curve seen from days 9-15 (which have no proposed explanation) and the optical dips seen out of eclipse from days 41-61 (likely caused by raised rims of the accretion disk occulting the bright inner regions of the disk as seen over specific orbital phases). The expanding shell and wind cleared enough from days 12-15 so that the inner binary system became visible, resulting in the sudden onset of eclipses and the turn-on of the supersoft X-ray source. On day 15, a strong asymmetry in the out-of-eclipse light points to the existence of the accretion stream. The normal optical flickering restarts on day 24.5. For days 15-26, eclipse mapping shows that the optical source is spherically symmetric with a radius of 4.1 R_sun. For days 26-41, the optical light is coming from a rim-bright disk of radius 3.4 R_sun. For days 41-67, the optical source is a center-bright disk of radius 2.2 R_sun. Throughout the eruption, the colors remain essentially constant. We present 12 eclipse times during eruption plus five just after the eruption.
  • We searched for long period variation in V-band, Ic-band and RXTE X-ray light curves of the High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) LS 1698 / RX J1037.5-5647, HD 110432 / 1H 1249-637 and HD 161103 / RX J1744.7-2713 in an attempt to discover orbitally induced variation. Data were obtained primarily from the ASAS database and were supplemented by shorter term observations made with the 24- and 40-inch ANU telescopes and one of the robotic PROMPT telescopes. Fourier periodograms suggested the existence of long period variation in the V-band light curves of all three HMXBs, however folding the data at those periods did not reveal convincing periodic variation. At this point we cannot rule out the existence of long term V-band variation for these three sources and hints of longer term variation may be seen in the higher precision PROMPT data. Long term V-band observations, on the order of several years, taken at a frequency of at least once per week and with a precision of 0.01 mag, therefore still have a chance of revealing long term variation in these three HMXBs.
  • Ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN) 2009bb are presented, following the flux evolution from -10 to +285 days past B-band maximum. Thanks to the very early discovery, it is possible to place tight constraints on the SN explosion epoch. The expansion velocities measured from near maximum spectra are found to be only slightly smaller than those measured from spectra of the prototype broad-lined SN 1998bw associated with GRB 980425. Fitting an analytical model to the pseudo-bolometric light curve of SN 2009bb suggests that 4.1+-1.9 Msun of material was ejected with 0.22 +-0.06 Msun of it being 56Ni. The resulting kinetic energy is 1.8+-0.7x10^52 erg. This, together with an absolute peak magnitude of MB=-18.36+-0.44, places SN 2009bb on the energetic and luminous end of the broad-lined Type Ic (SN Ic) sequence. Detection of helium in the early time optical spectra accompanied with strong radio emission, and high metallicity of its environment makes SN 2009bb a peculiar object. Similar to the case for GRBs, we find that the bulk explosion parameters of SN 2009bb cannot account for the copious energy coupled to relativistic ejecta, and conclude that another energy reservoir (a central engine) is required to power the radio emission. Nevertheless, the analysis of the SN 2009bb nebular spectrum suggests that the failed GRB detection is not imputable to a large angle between the line-of-sight and the GRB beamed radiation. Therefore, if a GRB was produced during the SN 2009bb explosion, it was below the threshold of the current generation of gamma-ray instruments.
  • The eclipsing and strongly interacting binary star system R Arae (HD149730) is in a very active and very short-lived stage of its evolution. R Ara consists of a B9V primary and an unknown secondary. We have collected the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archival data on R Ara, with most of the data being studied for the first time. There are 117 high resolution IUE spectra taken in 1980, 1982, 1985, 1989, and 1991. We provide photometric and spectroscopic evidence for mass transfer and propose a geometry for the accretion structure. We use colour scale radial velocity plots to view the complicated behavior of the blended absorption features and to distinguish the motions of hotter and cooler regions within the system. We observed a primary eclipse of R Ara in 2008 and have verified that its period is increasing. A model of the system and its evolutionary status is presented.
  • Guidorzi has now written two papers (astro-ph/0507588 and astro-ph/0508483, both accepted to MNRAS) on the GRB variability-luminosity correlation in which he finds that expanded samples of L vs. V data are not well described by a power law because the scatter of the data around such a model is more than can be accounted for by the data's statistical errors alone (sample variance) -- "in contrast with the original findings by Reichart et al. (2001)" -- but then proceeds to model these data with a power law anyway and finds significantly shallower L vs. V relationships than Reichart et al. (2001) found. However, as Reichart & Nysewander (2005; astro-ph/0508111) pointed out after Guidorzi's first posting but before his second, Reichart et al. (2001) never modeled their L vs. V data with a power law. Instead, they used a power law with a distribution around it to accommodate and measure this sample variance. Ignoring sample variance in a fit that requires it very easily results in incorrect fitted parameter values due to increased sensitivity to outliers, as well as significantly underestimated uncertainties in these fitted parameter values. Fitting to Guidorzi's own data, Reichart & Nysewander (2005) showed that when sample variance is included in the model, L ~ V^3.4(+0.9,-0.6) with a sample variance of sigma_logV = 0.20(+0.04,-0.04), which is in excellent agreement with the original finding of Reichart et al. (2001) -- L ~ V^3.3(+1.1,-0.9) with a sample variance of sigma_logV = 0.18(+0.07,-0.05) -- when the sample was approximately one-third its current size.
  • Recently, Guidorzi et al. (2005) expanded the size of the sample of GRBs for which variabilities and peak luminosities have been measured, from 11 to 32. They confirm the existence of a correlation, but find a dramatically different relationship between L and V than had originally been found. We find that this is the result of improper statistical methodology. When we fit a model to the data that accommodates both statistical variance (in two dimensions) and sample variance, we find that L ~ V^3.4(+0.9,-0.6) with a sample variance of sigma_logV = 0.20(+0.04,-0.04), which is consistent with the original finding of Reichart et al. (2001) -- L ~ V^3.3(+1.1,-0.9) with a sample variance of sigma_logV = 0.18(+0.07,-0.05) -- and inconsistent with the finding of Guidorzi et al. (2005): L ~ V^1.3(+0.8,-0.4) with sample variance assumed to be zero.
  • We use the possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) developed by Reichart et al. (2000) to estimate the intrinsic luminosity, and thus the redshift, of 907 long-duration GRBs from the BATSE 4B catalog. We describe a method based on Bayesian inference which allows us to infer the intrinsic GRB burst rate as a function of redshift for bursts with estimated intrinsic luminosities and redshifts. We apply this method to the above sample of long-duration GRBs, and present some preliminary results.
  • We show that, if the long GRBs are produced by the collapse of massive stars, GRBs and their afterglows may provide a powerful probe of cosmology and the early universe.
  • We present evidence that the majority of rapidly-, well-localized gamma-ray bursts with undetected, or dark, optical afterglows, or `dark bursts' for short, are most likely the result of extinction by dust in the circumburst medium. First, we show that the dark bursts cannot be explained by a failure to image deeply enough quickly enough: We fit a variety of brightness distribution models to the optical data, and find that approx. 57(+13,-11)% of all bursts, and approx. 82(+22,-17)% of dark bursts, have afterglows that are fainter than R = 24 mag 18 hours after the burst. Secondly, we show that dark bursts tend to be X-ray and radio faint. Thirdly, we show that these correlations, and more specifically the optical vs. X-ray and optical vs. radio distributions, can be explained within the framework of the relativistic fireball model if the dark bursts are extinguished by circumburst dust, and the density of the circumburst medium spans many orders of magnitude, from densities that are typical of the Galactic disk to densities that are typical of dense clouds. Finally, we show that Galactic extinction, host galaxy extinction unrelated to the circumburst medium, and the following high redshift effects - Lyman limit absorption in the source frame, absorption by the Ly-alpha forest, absorption by excited molecular hydrogen in the circumburst medium, and source-frame extinction by the FUV component of the extinction curve - might contribute to the number of dark bursts, but only in small numbers.
  • The distances to which the optical flash destroys dust via sublimation, and the burst and afterglow change the size distribution of the dust via fragmentation, are functions of grain size. Furthermore, the sublimation distance is a decreasing function of grain size, while the fragmentation distance is a decreasing function of grain size for large grains and an increasing function of grain size for small grains. We investigate how these very different, but somewhat complementary, processes change the optical depth of the circumburst medium. To this end, we adopt a canonical distribution of graphite and silicate grain sizes, and a simple fragmentation model, and we compute the post-burst/optical flash/afterglow optical depth of a circumburst cloud of constant density n and size R as a function of burst and afterglow isotropic-equivalent X-ray energy E and spectral index alpha, and optical flash isotropic-equivalent peak luminosity L: This improves upon previous analyses that consider circumburst dust of a uniform grain size. We find that circumburst clouds do not significantly extinguish (tau < 0.3) the optical afterglow if R < 10L_{49}^{1/2} pc, fairly independent of n, E, and alpha, or if N_H < 5x10^{20} cm^{-2}. On the other hand, we find that circumburst clouds do significantly extinguish (tau > 3) the optical afterglow if R > 10L_{49}^{1/2} pc and N_H > 5x10^{21} cm^{-2}, creating a so-called `dark burst'. The majority of bursts are dark, and as circumburst extinction is probably the primary cause of this, this implies that most dark bursts occur in clouds of this size and mass M > 3x10^5L_{49} M_{sun}. Clouds of this size and mass are typical of giant molecular clouds, and are active regions of star formation.
  • We exploit the 14 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts z and the 7 GRBs for which there are constraints on z to determine the GRB rate R_{GRB}(z), using a method based on Bayesian inference. We find that, despite the qualitative differences between the observed GRB rate and estimates of the SFR in the universe, current data are consistent with R_{GRB}(z) being proportional to the SFR.
  • The discovery of an optical counterpart to GRB010222 (detected by BeppoSAX; Piro 2001) was announced 4.4 hrs after the burst by Henden (2001a). The Sloan Digital Sky Survey's 0.5m photometric telescope (PT) and 2.5m survey telescope were used to observe the afterglow of GRB010222 starting 4.8 hours after the GRB. The 0.5m PT observed the afterglow in five, 300 sec g' band exposures over the course of half an hour, measuring a temporal decay rate in this short period of F_nu \propto t^{-1.0+/-0.5}. The 2.5m camera imaged the counterpart nearly simultaneously in five filters (u' g' r' i' z'), with r' = 18.74+/-0.02 at 12:10 UT. These multicolor observations, corrected for reddening and the afterglow's temporal decay, are well fit by the power-law F_nu \propto nu^{-0.90+/-0.03} with the exception of the u' band UV flux which is 20% below this slope. We examine possible interpretations of this spectral shape, including source extinction in a star forming region.
  • We present a possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long-duration gamma-ray bursts based on the variability of their light curves. We also present a preliminary application of this luminosity estimator to 907 long-duration bursts from the BATSE catalog.
  • We present a possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long-duration gamma-ray bursts based on the variability of their light curves.
  • The relative brightening and reddening of the optical afterglows of GRB 970228 and GRB 980326 around 20 - 30 days after these bursts have been attributed to supernovae, which are red (blueward of their spectral peak), and which peak in time after about 20(1+z) days. However, this direct evidence for a GRB/SN connection has recently been challenged. It has been suggested that the late afterglows of these bursts can be explained by dust echoes, of which we consider two cases: (1) the scattering of light from the afterglow (the forward shock), the optical flash (the reverse shock), and/or optical light from the burst itself by a shell of dust at a radius R from the progenitor, and (2) the absorption and thermal re-emission of this light by this shell of dust. In this paper, we model and compute dust echo light curves and spectra for both cases. Although the late-time afterglow of GRB 980326 was not sufficiently well sampled to rule out a dust echo description, we find that the late-time afterglow of GRB 970228 cannot be explained by a dust echo.
  • We present a possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long gamma-ray bursts based on the variability of their light curves. To construct the luminosity estimator, we use CGRO/BATSE data for 13 bursts, Wind/KONUS data for 5 bursts, Ulysses/GRB data for 1 burst, and NEAR/XGRS data for 1 burst. Spectroscopic redshifts, peak fluxes, and high resolution light curves are available for 11 of these bursts; partial information is available for the remaining 9 bursts. We find that the isotropic-equivalent luminosities L of these bursts positively correlate with a rigorously-constructed measure V of the variability of their light curves. We fit a model to these data that accommodates both intrinsic scatter (statistical variance) and extrinsic scatter (sample variance). If one excludes GRB 980425 from the fit on the grounds that its association with SN 1998bw at a redshift of z = 0.0085 is not secure, the luminosity estimator spans approx. 2.5 orders of magnitude in L, and the slope of the correlation between L and V is positive with a probability of 1 - 1.4 x 10^-4 (3.8 sigma). Although GRB 980425 is excluded from this fit, its L and V values are consistent with the fitted model, which suggests that GRB 980425 may well be associated with SN 1998bw, and that GRB 980425 and the cosmological bursts may share a common physical origin. If one includes GRB 980425 in the fit, the luminosity estimator spans approx. 6.3 orders of magnitude in L, and the slope of the correlation is positive with a probability of 1 - 9.3 x 10^-7 (4.9 sigma). Independently of whether or not GRB 980425 should be included in the fit, its light curve is unique in that it is much less variable than the other approx. 17 light curves in our sample for which the signal-to-noise is reasonably good.