• Analyzing massive complex networks yields promising insights about our everyday lives. Building scalable algorithms to do so is a challenging task that requires a careful analysis and an extensive evaluation. However, engineering such algorithms is often hindered by the scarcity of publicly~available~datasets. Network generators serve as a tool to alleviate this problem by providing synthetic instances with controllable parameters. However, many network generators fail to provide instances on a massive scale due to their sequential nature or resource constraints. Additionally, truly scalable network generators are few and often limited in their realism. In this work, we present novel generators for a variety of network models that are frequently used as benchmarks. By making use of pseudorandomization and divide-and-conquer schemes, our generators follow a communication-free paradigm. The resulting generators are thus embarrassingly parallel and have a near optimal scaling behavior. This allows us to generate instances of up to $2^{43}$ vertices and $2^{47}$ edges in less than 22 minutes on 32768 cores. Therefore, our generators allow new graph families to be used on an unprecedented scale.
  • This paper deals with the problem of point-to-point reachability in multi-linear systems. These systems consist of a partition of the Euclidean space into a finite number of regions and a constant derivative assigned to each region in the partition, which governs the dynamical behavior of the system within it. The reachability problem for multi-linear systems has been proven to be decidable for the two-dimensional case and undecidable for the dimension three and higher. Multi-linear systems however exhibit certain properties that make them very suitable for topological analysis. We prove that reachability can be decided exactly in the 3-dimensional case when systems satisfy certain conditions. We show with experiments that our approach can be orders of magnitude more efficient than simulation.