• We present high-precision timing data over time spans of up to 11 years for 45 millisecond pulsars observed as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project, aimed at detecting and characterizing low-frequency gravitational waves. The pulsars were observed with the Arecibo Observatory and/or the Green Bank Telescope at frequencies ranging from 327 MHz to 2.3 GHz. Most pulsars were observed with approximately monthly cadence, with six high--timing-precision pulsars observed weekly, and all were observed at widely separated frequencies at each observing epoch in order to fit for time-variable dispersion delays. We describe our methods for data processing, time-of-arrival (TOA) calculation, and the implementation of a new, automated method for removing outlier TOAs. We fit a timing model for each pulsar that includes spin, astrometric, and, if necessary, binary parameters, in addition to time-variable dispersion delays and parameters that quantify pulse-profile evolution with frequency. The new timing solutions provide three new parallax measurements, two new Shapiro delay measurements, and two new measurements of large orbital-period variations. We fit models that characterize sources of noise for each pulsar. We find that 11 pulsars show significant red noise, with generally smaller spectral indices than typically measured for non-recycled pulsars, possibly suggesting a different origin. Future papers will use these data to constrain or detect the signatures of gravitational-wave signals.
  • We report on an effort to extract and monitor interstellar scintillation parameters in regular timing observations collected for the NANOGrav pulsar timing array. Scattering delays are measured by creating dynamic spectra for each pulsar and observing epoch of wide-band observations centered near 1500 MHz and carried out at the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory. The ~800-MHz wide frequency bands imply dramatic changes in scintillation bandwidth across the bandpass, and a stretching routine has been included to account for this scaling. For most of the 10 pulsars for which the scaling has been measured, the bandwidths scale with frequency less steeply than expected for a Kolmogorov medium. We find estimated scattering delay values that vary with time by up to an order of magnitude. The mean measured scattering delays are similar to previously published values and slightly higher than predicted by interstellar medium models. We investigate the possibility of increasing the timing precision by mitigating timing errors introduced by the scattering delays. For most of the pulsars, the uncertainty in the time of arrival of a single timing point is much larger than the maximum variation of the scattering delay, suggesting that diffractive scintillation remains only a negligible part of their noise budget.
  • High-precision timing of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) over years to decades is a promising technique for direct detection of gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Time-variable, multi-path scattering in the interstellar medium is a significant source of noise for this detector, particularly as timing precision approaches 10 ns or better for MSPs in the pulsar timing array. For many MSPs the scattering delay above 1 GHz is at the limit of detectability; therefore, we study it at lower frequencies. Using the LOFAR (LOw-Frequency ARray) radio telescope we have analyzed short (5-20 min) observations of three MSPs in order to estimate the scattering delay at 110-190 MHz, where the number of scintles is large and, hence, the statistical uncertainty in the scattering delay is small. We used cyclic spectroscopy, still relatively novel in radio astronomy, on baseband-sampled data to achieve unprecedented frequency resolution while retaining adequate pulse phase resolution. We detected scintillation structure in the spectra of the MSPs PSR B1257+12, PSR J1810+1744, and PSR J2317+1439 with diffractive bandwidths of $6\pm 3$, $2.0\pm 0.3$, and $\sim 7$ kHz, respectively, where the estimate for PSR J2317+1439 is reliable to about a factor of 2. For the brightest of the three pulsars, PSR J1810+1744, we found that the diffractive bandwidth has a power-law behavior $\Delta\nu_d \propto \nu^{\alpha}$, where $\nu$ is the observing frequency and $\alpha = 4.5\pm 0.5$, consistent with a Kolmogorov inhomogeneity spectrum. We conclude that this technique holds promise for monitoring the scattering delay of MSPs with LOFAR and other high-sensitivity, low-frequency arrays like SKA-Low.
  • We have detected a strong deflection of radio waves from the pulsar PSR B0834+06 in scintillation observations. Interference between the undeflected pulsar image and deflected subimages allows single dish interferometry of the interstellar medium with sub-milliarcsecond resolution. We infer the presence of scattering structure(s) similar to those that are thought to cause Extreme Scattering Events in quasar flux monitoring programs: size ~ 0.2 AU (an angular size of 0.1 mas) with an electron density of > 10^3 compared to the warm ionized medium. The deflectors are nearly stationary in a scattering screen that is thin (< 5% of the pulsar-observer distance in extent), is located 70% of the way from the Earth to the pulsar, and has been seen consistently in observations dating back 20 years. The pulsar scans the scattering screen at a velocity of 110 km/s with a detection radius of 15 mas. Pulsar observations such as these -- particularly with a new generation of low-frequency radio telescopes with large collecting areas -- hold promise for improving constraints on the poorly understood physical characteristics and space density of the deflecting structures. Such observations may also prove useful in correcting deviations the deflectors produce in high-precision timing of millarcsecond pulsars.
  • Our theory relates the secondary spectrum, the 2D power spectrum of the radio dynamic spectrum, to the scattered pulsar image in a thin scattering screen geometry. Recently discovered parabolic arcs in secondary spectra are generic features for media that scatter radiation at angles much larger than the rms scattering angle. Each point in the secondary spectrum maps particular values of differential arrival-time delay and fringe rate (or differential Doppler frequency) between pairs of components in the scattered image. Arcs correspond to a parabolic relation between these quantities through their common dependence on the angle of arrival of scattered components. Arcs appear even without consideration of the dispersive nature of the plasma. Arcs are more prominent in media with negligible inner scale and with shallow wavenumber spectra, such as the Kolmogorov spectrum, and when the scattered image is elongated along the velocity direction. The arc phenomenon can be used, therefore, to constrain the inner scale and the anisotropy of scattering irregularities for directions to nearby pulsars. Arcs are truncated by finite source size and thus provide sub micro arc sec resolution for probing emission regions in pulsars and compact active galactic nuclei. Multiple arcs sometimes seen signify two or more discrete scattering screens along the propagation path, and small arclets oriented oppositely to the main arc persisting for long durations indicate the occurrence of long-term multiple images from the scattering screen.
  • PSR B1259-63 is in a highly eccentric 3.4 yr orbit around the Be-star SS2883. The system is located in the direction of the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm at a distance of $\sim$1.5 kpc. We have made scintillation observations of the pulsar far from periastron at 4.8 GHz and 8.4 GHz, determining the diffractive bandwidth, $\Delta \nu_{\rm d}$, and timescale, $\Delta t_{\rm d}$, at both frequencies. We find no dependency on orbital phase until within 30 days of periastron. The data indicate that the scintillation is caused, not by the circumstellar environment, but by an HII region within the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm located at least three-quarters of the way to the pulsar. Close to periastron, when the line-of-sight to the pulsar intersects the disk of the Be star, the electron densities within the disk are sufficient to overcome the `lever-arm effect' and produce a reduction in the scintillation bandwidth by six orders of magnitude.