• Approximate counting via correlation decay is the core algorithmic technique used in the sharp delineation of the computational phase transition that arises in the approximation of the partition function of anti-ferromagnetic two-spin models. Previous analyses of correlation-decay algorithms implicitly depended on the occurrence of strong spatial mixing (SSM). This means that one uses worst-case analysis of the recursive procedure that creates the sub-instances. We develop a new analysis method that is more refined than the worst-case analysis. We take the shape of instances in the computation tree into consideration and amortise against certain "bad" instances that are created as the recursion proceeds. This enables us to show correlation decay and to obtain an FPTAS even when SSM fails. We apply our technique to the problem of approximately counting independent sets in hypergraphs with degree upper-bound Delta and with a lower bound k on the arity of hyperedges. Liu and Lin gave an FPTAS for k>=2 and Delta<=5 (lack of SSM was the obstacle preventing this algorithm from being generalised to Delta=6). Our technique gives a tight result for Delta=6, showing that there is an FPTAS for k>=3 and Delta<=6. The best previously-known approximation scheme for Delta=6 is the Markov-chain simulation based FPRAS of Bordewich, Dyer and Karpinski, which only works for k>=8. Our technique also applies for larger values of k, giving an FPTAS for k>=Delta. This bound is not substantially stronger than existing randomised results in the literature. Nevertheless, it gives the first deterministic approximation scheme in this regime. Moreover, unlike existing results, it leads to an FPTAS for counting dominating sets in regular graphs with sufficiently large degree. We further demonstrate that approximately counting independent sets in hypergraphs is NP-hard even within the uniqueness regime.
  • We study the structure learning problem for $H$-colorings, an important class of Markov random fields that capture key combinatorial structures on graphs, including proper colorings and independent sets, as well as spin systems from statistical physics. The learning problem is as follows: for a fixed (and known) constraint graph $H$ with $q$ colors and an unknown graph $G=(V,E)$ with $n$ vertices, given uniformly random $H$-colorings of $G$, how many samples are required to learn the edges of the unknown graph $G$? We give a characterization of $H$ for which the problem is identifiable for every $G$, i.e., we can learn $G$ with an infinite number of samples. We also show that there are identifiable constraint graphs for which one cannot hope to learn every graph $G$ efficiently. We focus particular attention on the case of proper vertex $q$-colorings of graphs of maximum degree $d$ where intriguing connections to statistical physics phase transitions appear. We prove that in the tree uniqueness region (when $q>d$) the problem is identifiable and we can learn $G$ in ${\rm poly}(d,q) \times O(n^2\log{n})$ time. In contrast for soft-constraint systems, such as the Ising model, the best possible running time is exponential in $d$. In the tree non-uniqueness region (when $q\leq d$) we prove that the problem is not identifiable and thus $G$ cannot be learned. Moreover, when $q<d-\sqrt{d} + \Theta(1)$ we prove that even learning an equivalent graph (any graph with the same set of $H$-colorings) is computationally hard---sample complexity is exponential in $n$ in the worst case. We further explore the connection between the efficiency/hardness of the structure learning problem and the uniqueness/non-uniqueness phase transition for general $H$-colorings and prove that under the well-known Dobrushin uniqueness condition, we can learn $G$ in ${\rm poly}(d,q)\times O(n^2\log{n})$ time.
  • We consider the problem of sampling from the Potts model on random regular graphs. It is conjectured that sampling is possible when the temperature of the model is in the uniqueness regime of the regular tree, but positive algorithmic results have been for the most part elusive. In this paper, for all integers $q\geq 3$ and $\Delta\geq 3$, we develop algorithms that produce samples within error $o(1)$ from the $q$-state Potts model on random $\Delta$-regular graphs, whenever the temperature is in uniqueness, for both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic cases. The algorithm for the antiferromagnetic Potts model is based on iteratively adding the edges of the graph and resampling a bichromatic class that contains the endpoints of the newly added edge. Key to the algorithm is how to perform the resampling step efficiently since bichromatic classes may induce linear-sized components. To this end, we exploit the tree uniqueness to show that the average growth of bichromatic components is typically small, which allows us to use correlation decay algorithms for the resampling step. While the precise uniqueness threshold on the tree is not known for general values of $q$ and $\Delta$ in the antiferromagnetic case, our algorithm works throughout uniqueness regardless of its value. In the case of the ferromagnetic Potts model, we simplify the algorithm significantly by utilising the random-cluster representation of the model. In particular, we show that a percolation-type algorithm succeeds in sampling from the random-cluster model with parameters $p,q$ on random $\Delta$-regular graphs for all values of $q\geq 1$ and $p<p_c(q,\Delta)$, where $p_c(q,\Delta)$ corresponds to a uniqueness threshold for the model on the $\Delta$-regular tree. When restricted to integer values of $q$, this yields a simplified algorithm for the ferromagnetic Potts model on random $\Delta$-regular graphs.
  • We study the complexity of approximating the independent set polynomial $Z_G(\lambda)$ of a graph $G$ with maximum degree $\Delta$ when the activity $\lambda$ is a complex number. This problem is already well understood when $\lambda$ is real using connections to the $\Delta$-regular tree $T$. The key concept in that case is the "occupation ratio" of the tree $T$. This ratio is the contribution to $Z_T(\lambda)$ from independent sets containing the root of the tree, divided by $Z_T(\lambda)$ itself. If $\lambda$ is such that the occupation ratio converges to a limit, as the height of $T$ grows, then there is an FPTAS for approximating $Z_G(\lambda)$ on a graph $G$ with maximum degree $\Delta$. Otherwise, the approximation problem is NP-hard. Unsurprisingly, the case where $\lambda$ is complex is more challenging. Peters and Regts identified the complex values of $\lambda$ for which the occupation ratio of the $\Delta$-regular tree converges. These values carve a cardioid-shaped region $\Lambda_\Delta$ in the complex plane. Motivated by the picture in the real case, they asked whether $\Lambda_\Delta$ marks the true approximability threshold for general complex values $\lambda$. Our main result shows that for every $\lambda$ outside of $\Lambda_\Delta$, the problem of approximating $Z_G(\lambda)$ on graphs $G$ with maximum degree at most $\Delta$ is indeed NP-hard. In fact, when $\lambda$ is outside of $\Lambda_\Delta$ and is not a positive real number, we give the stronger result that approximating $Z_G(\lambda)$ is actually #P-hard. If $\lambda$ is a negative real number outside of $\Lambda_\Delta$, we show that it is #P-hard to even decide whether $Z_G(\lambda)>0$, resolving in the affirmative a conjecture of Harvey, Srivastava and Vondrak. Our proof techniques are based around tools from complex analysis - specifically the study of iterative multivariate rational maps.
  • We study the mixing properties of the single-site Markov chain known as the Glauber dynamics for sampling $k$-colorings of a sparse random graph $G(n,d/n)$ for constant $d$. The best known rapid mixing results for general graphs are in terms of the maximum degree $\Delta$ of the input graph $G$ and hold when $k>11\Delta/6$ for all $G$. Improved results hold when $k>\alpha\Delta$ for graphs with girth $\geq 5$ and $\Delta$ sufficiently large where $\alpha\approx 1.7632\ldots$ is the root of $\alpha=\exp(1/\alpha)$; further improvements on the constant $\alpha$ hold with stronger girth and maximum degree assumptions. For sparse random graphs the maximum degree is a function of $n$ and the goal is to obtain results in terms of the expected degree $d$. The following rapid mixing results for $G(n,d/n)$ hold with high probability over the choice of the random graph for sufficiently large constant~$d$. Mossel and Sly (2009) proved rapid mixing for constant $k$, and Efthymiou (2014) improved this to $k$ linear in~$d$. The condition was improved to $k>3d$ by Yin and Zhang (2016) using non-MCMC methods. Here we prove rapid mixing when $k>\alpha d$ where $\alpha\approx 1.7632\ldots$ is the same constant as above. Moreover we obtain $O(n^{3})$ mixing time of the Glauber dynamics, while in previous rapid mixing results the exponent was an increasing function in $d$. As in previous results for random graphs our proof analyzes an appropriately defined block dynamics to "hide" high-degree vertices. One new aspect in our improved approach is utilizing so-called local uniformity properties for the analysis of block dynamics. To analyze the "burn-in" phase we prove a concentration inequality for the number of disagreements propagating in large blocks.
  • We study the problem of approximately evaluating the independent set polynomial of bounded-degree graphs at a point lambda or, equivalently, the problem of approximating the partition function of the hard-core model with activity lambda on graphs G of max degree D. For lambda>0, breakthrough results of Weitz and Sly established a computational transition from easy to hard at lambda_c(D)=(D-1)^(D-1)/(D-2)^D, which coincides with the tree uniqueness phase transition from statistical physics. For lambda<0, the evaluation of the independent set polynomial is connected to the conditions of the Lovasz Local Lemma. Shearer identified the threshold lambda*(D)=(D-1)^(D-1)/D^D as the maximum value p such that every family of events with failure probability at most p and whose dependency graph has max degree D has nonempty intersection. Very recently, Patel and Regts, and Harvey et al. have independently designed FPTASes for approximating the partition function whenever |lambda|<lambda*(D). Our main result establishes for the first time a computational transition at the Shearer threshold. We show that for all D>=3, for all lambda<-lambda*(D), it is NP-hard to approximate the partition function on bipartite graphs of maximum degree D, even within an exponential factor. Thus, our result, combined with the FPTASes for lambda>-lambda*(D), establishes a phase transition for negative activities. In fact, we now have the following picture for the problem of approximating the partition function with activity lambda on graphs G of max degree D. (i) For -lambda*(D)<lambda<lambda_c(D), the problem admits an FPTAS. (ii) For lambda<-lambda*(D) or lambda>lambda_c(D), the problem is NP-hard. Rather than the tree uniqueness threshold of the positive case, the phase transition for negative activities corresponds to the existence of zeros for the partition function of the tree below -lambda*(D).
  • The cardinality constraint is an intrinsic way to restrict the solution structure in many domains, for example, sparse learning, feature selection, and compressed sensing. To solve a cardinality constrained problem, the key challenge is to solve the projection onto the cardinality constraint set, which is NP-hard in general when there exist multiple overlapped cardinality constraints. In this paper, we consider the scenario where the overlapped cardinality constraints satisfy a Three-view Cardinality Structure (TVCS), which reflects the natural restriction in many applications, such as identification of gene regulatory networks and task-worker assignment problem. We cast the projection into a linear programming, and show that for TVCS, the vertex solution of this linear programming is the solution for the original projection problem. We further prove that such solution can be found with the complexity proportional to the number of variables and constraints. We finally use synthetic experiments and two interesting applications in bioinformatics and crowdsourcing to validate the proposed TVCS model and method.
  • The Gibbs sampler is a particularly popular Markov chain used for learning and inference problems in Graphical Models (GMs). These tasks are computationally intractable in general, and the Gibbs sampler often suffers from slow mixing. In this paper, we study the Swendsen-Wang dynamics which is a more sophisticated Markov chain designed to overcome bottlenecks that impede the Gibbs sampler. We prove O(\log n) mixing time for attractive binary pairwise GMs (i.e., ferromagnetic Ising models) on stochastic partitioned graphs having n vertices, under some mild conditions, including low temperature regions where the Gibbs sampler provably mixes exponentially slow. Our experiments also confirm that the Swendsen-Wang sampler significantly outperforms the Gibbs sampler when they are used for learning parameters of attractive GMs.
  • We show that determining the rank of a tensor over a field has the same complexity as deciding the existential theory of that field. This implies earlier NP-hardness results by H{\aa}stad~\cite{H90}. The hardness proof also implies an algebraic universality result.
  • Recent results establish for 2-spin antiferromagnetic systems that the computational complexity of approximating the partition function on graphs of maximum degree D undergoes a phase transition that coincides with the uniqueness phase transition on the infinite D-regular tree. For the ferromagnetic Potts model we investigate whether analogous hardness results hold. Goldberg and Jerrum showed that approximating the partition function of the ferromagnetic Potts model is at least as hard as approximating the number of independent sets in bipartite graphs (#BIS-hardness). We improve this hardness result by establishing it for bipartite graphs of maximum degree D. We first present a detailed picture for the phase diagram for the infinite D-regular tree, giving a refined picture of its first-order phase transition and establishing the critical temperature for the coexistence of the disordered and ordered phases. We then prove for all temperatures below this critical temperature that it is #BIS-hard to approximate the partition function on bipartite graphs of maximum degree D. As a corollary, it is #BIS-hard to approximate the number of k-colorings on bipartite graphs of maximum degree D when k <= D/(2 ln D). The #BIS-hardness result for the ferromagnetic Potts model uses random bipartite regular graphs as a gadget in the reduction. The analysis of these random graphs relies on recent connections between the maxima of the expectation of their partition function, attractive fixpoints of the associated tree recursions, and induced matrix norms. We extend these connections to random regular graphs for all ferromagnetic models and establish the Bethe prediction for every ferromagnetic spin system on random regular graphs. We also prove for the ferromagnetic Potts model that the Swendsen-Wang algorithm is torpidly mixing on random D-regular graphs at the critical temperature for large q.
  • Recent inapproximability results of Sly (2010), together with an approximation algorithm presented by Weitz (2006) establish a beautiful picture for the computational complexity of approximating the partition function of the hard-core model. Let $\lambda_c(T_\Delta)$ denote the critical activity for the hard-model on the infinite $\Delta$-regular tree. Weitz presented an FPTAS for the partition function when $\lambda<\lambda_c(T_\Delta)$ for graphs with constant maximum degree $\Delta$. In contrast, Sly showed that for all $\Delta\geq 3$, there exists $\epsilon_\Delta>0$ such that (unless RP=NP) there is no FPRAS for approximating the partition function on graphs of maximum degree $\Delta$ for activities $\lambda$ satisfying $\lambda_c(T_\Delta)<\lambda<\lambda_c(T_\Delta)+\epsilon_\Delta$. We prove that a similar phenomenon holds for the antiferromagnetic Ising model. Recent results of Li et al. and Sinclair et al. extend Weitz's approach to any 2-spin model, which includes the antiferromagnetic Ising model, to yield an FPTAS for the partition function for all graphs of constant maximum degree $\Delta$ when the parameters of the model lie in the uniqueness regime of the infinite tree $T_\Delta$. We prove the complementary result that for the antiferrogmanetic Ising model without external field that, unless RP=NP, for all $\Delta\geq 3$, there is no FPRAS for approximating the partition function on graphs of maximum degree $\Delta$ when the inverse temperature lies in the non-uniqueness regime of the infinite tree $T_\Delta$. Our results extend to a region of the parameter space for general 2-spin models. Our proof works by relating certain second moment calculations for random $\Delta$-regular bipartite graphs to the tree recursions used to establish the critical points on the infinite tree.
  • We study the hard-core model defined on independent sets of an input graph where the independent sets are weighted by a parameter $\lambda>0$. For constant $\Delta$, previous work of Weitz (2006) established an FPTAS for the partition function for graphs of maximum degree $\Delta$ when $\lambda< \lambda_c(\Delta)$. The threshold $\lambda_c(\Delta)$ is the critical point for the phase transition for uniqueness/non-uniqueness on the infinite $\Delta$-regular trees. Sly (2010) showed that there is no FPRAS, unless NP=RP, when $\lambda>\lambda_c(\Delta)$. The running time of Weitz's algorithm is exponential in $\log(\Delta)$. Here we present an FPRAS for the partition function whose running time is $O^*(n^2)$. We analyze the simple single-site Glauber dynamics for sampling from the associated Gibbs distribution. We prove there exists a constant $\Delta_0$ such that for all graphs with maximum degree $\Delta\geq\Delta_0$ and girth $\geq 7$, the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics is $O(n\log(n))$ when $\lambda<\lambda_c(\Delta)$. Our work complements that of Weitz which applies for constant $\Delta$ whereas our work applies for all $\Delta \geq \Delta_0$. We utilize loopy BP (belief propagation), a widely-used inference algorithm. A novel aspect of our work is using the principal eigenvector for the BP operator to design a distance function which contracts in expectation for pairs of states that behave like the BP fixed point. We also prove that the Glauber dynamics behaves locally like loopy BP. As a byproduct we obtain that the Glauber dynamics converges, after a short burn-in period, close to the BP fixed point, and this implies that the fixed point of loopy BP is a close approximation to the Gibbs distribution. Using these connections we establish that loopy BP quickly converges to the Gibbs distribution when the girth $\geq 6$ and $\lambda<\lambda_c(\Delta)$.
  • We study the $q$-state ferromagnetic Potts model on the $n$-vertex complete graph known as the mean-field (Curie-Weiss) model. We analyze the Swendsen-Wang algorithm which is a Markov chain that utilizes the random cluster representation for the ferromagnetic Potts model to recolor large sets of vertices in one step and potentially overcomes obstacles that inhibit single-site Glauber dynamics. The case $q=2$ (the Swendsen-Wang algorithm for the ferromagnetic Ising model) undergoes a slow-down at the uniqueness/non-uniqueness critical temperature for the infinite $\Delta$-regular tree (Long et al., 2014) but yet still has polynomial mixing time at all (inverse) temperatures $\beta>0$ (Cooper et al., 2000). In contrast for $q\geq 3$ there are two critical temperatures $0<\beta_{\mathrm{u}}<\beta_{\mathrm{rc}}$ that are relevant, these two critical points relate to phase transitions in the infinite tree. We prove that the mixing time of the Swendsen-Wang algorithm for the ferromagnetic Potts model on the $n$-vertex complete graph satisfies: (i) $O(1)$ for $\beta<\beta_{\mathrm{u}}$, (ii) $\Theta(n^{1/3})$ for $\beta=\beta_{\mathrm{u}}$, (iii) $\exp(n^{\Omega(1)})$ for $\beta_{\mathrm{u}}<\beta<\beta_{\mathrm{rc}}$, and (iv) $\Theta(\log{n})$ for $\beta\geq\beta_{\mathrm{rc}}$. These results complement refined results of Cuff et al. (2012) on the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics for the ferromagnetic Potts model. The most interesting aspect of our analysis is at the critical temperature $\beta=\beta_{\mathrm{u}}$, which requires a delicate choice of a potential function to balance the conflating factors for the slow drift away from a fixed point (which is repulsive but not Jacobian repulsive): close to the fixed point the variance from the percolation step dominates and sufficiently far from the fixed point the dynamics of the size of the dominant color class takes over.
  • Counting independent sets on bipartite graphs (#BIS) is considered a canonical counting problem of intermediate approximation complexity. It is conjectured that #BIS neither has an FPRAS nor is as hard as #SAT to approximate. We study #BIS in the general framework of two-state spin systems on bipartite graphs. We define two notions, nearly-independent phase-correlated spins and unary symmetry breaking. We prove that it is #BIS-hard to approximate the partition function of any 2-spin system on bipartite graphs supporting these two notions. As a consequence, we classify the complexity of approximating the partition function of antiferromagnetic 2-spin systems on bounded-degree bipartite graphs.
  • A remarkable connection has been established for antiferromagnetic 2-spin systems, including the Ising and hard-core models, showing that the computational complexity of approximating the partition function for graphs with maximum degree D undergoes a phase transition that coincides with the statistical physics uniqueness/non-uniqueness phase transition on the infinite D-regular tree. Despite this clear picture for 2-spin systems, there is little known for multi-spin systems. We present the first analog of the above inapproximability results for multi-spin systems. The main difficulty in previous inapproximability results was analyzing the behavior of the model on random D-regular bipartite graphs, which served as the gadget in the reduction. To this end one needs to understand the moments of the partition function. Our key contribution is connecting: (i) induced matrix norms, (ii) maxima of the expectation of the partition function, and (iii) attractive fixed points of the associated tree recursions (belief propagation). The view through matrix norms allows a simple and generic analysis of the second moment for any spin system on random D-regular bipartite graphs. This yields concentration results for any spin system in which one can analyze the maxima of the first moment. The connection to fixed points of the tree recursions enables an analysis of the maxima of the first moment for specific models of interest. For k-colorings we prove that for even k, in the tree non-uniqueness region (which corresponds to k<D) it is NP-hard, unless NP=RP, to approximate the number of colorings for triangle-free D-regular graphs. Our proof extends to the antiferromagnetic Potts model, and, in fact, to every antiferromagnetic model under a mild condition.
  • We study the problem of deterministic approximate counting of matchings and independent sets in graphs of bounded connective constant. More generally, we consider the problem of evaluating the partition functions of the monomer-dimer model (which is defined as a weighted sum over all matchings where each matching is given a weight $\gamma^{|V| - 2 |M|}$ in terms of a fixed parameter gamma called the monomer activity) and the hard core model (which is defined as a weighted sum over all independent sets where an independent set I is given a weight $\lambda^{|I|}$ in terms of a fixed parameter lambda called the vertex activity). The connective constant is a natural measure of the average degree of a graph which has been studied extensively in combinatorics and mathematical physics, and can be bounded by a constant even for certain unbounded degree graphs such as those sampled from the sparse Erd\H{o}s-R\'enyi model $G(n, d/n)$. Our main technical contribution is to prove the best possible rates of decay of correlations in the natural probability distributions induced by both the hard core model and the monomer-dimer model in graphs with a given bound on the connective constant. These results on decay of correlations are obtained using a new framework based on the so-called message approach that has been extensively used recently to prove such results for bounded degree graphs. We then use these optimal decay of correlations results to obtain FPTASs for the two problems on graphs of bounded connective constant. Our techniques also allow us to improve upon known bounds for decay of correlations for the hard core model on various regular lattices, including those obtained by Restrepo, Shin, Vigoda and Tetali (2011) for the special case of Z^2 using sophisticated numerically intensive methods tailored to that special case.
  • We propose modal Markov logic as an extension of propositional Markov logic to reason under the principle of maximum entropy for modal logics K45, KD45, and S5. Analogous to propositional Markov logic, the knowledge base consists of weighted formulas, whose weights are learned from data. However, in contrast to Markov logic, in our framework we use the knowledge base to define a probability distribution over non-equivalent epistemic situations (pointed Kripke structures) rather than over atoms, and use this distribution to assign probabilities to modal formulas. As in all probabilistic representations, the central task in our framework is inference. Although the size of the state space grows doubly exponentially in the number of propositions in the domain, we provide an algorithm that scales only exponentially in the size of the knowledge base. Finally, we briefly discuss the case of languages with an infinite number of propositions.
  • We study the computational complexity of approximately counting the number of independent sets of a graph with maximum degree Delta. More generally, for an input graph G=(V,E) and an activity lambda>0, we are interested in the quantity Z_G(lambda) defined as the sum over independent sets I weighted as w(I) = lambda^|I|. In statistical physics, Z_G(lambda) is the partition function for the hard-core model, which is an idealized model of a gas where the particles have non-negibile size. Recently, an interesting phase transition was shown to occur for the complexity of approximating the partition function. Weitz showed an FPAS for the partition function for any graph of maximum degree Delta when Delta is constant and lambda< lambda_c(Tree_Delta):=(Delta-1)^(Delta-1)/(Delta-2)^Delta. The quantity lambda_c(Tree_Delta) is the critical point for the so-called uniqueness threshold on the infinite, regular tree of degree Delta. On the other side, Sly proved that there does not exist efficient (randomized) approximation algorithms for lambda_c(Tree_Delta) < lambda < lambda_c(Tree_Delta)+epsilon(Delta), unless NP=RP, for some function epsilon(Delta)>0. We remove the upper bound in the assumptions of Sly's result for Delta not equal to 4 and 5, that is, we show that there does not exist efficient randomized approximation algorithms for all lambda>lambda_c(Tree_Delta) for Delta=3 and Delta>= 6. Sly's inapproximability result uses a clever reduction, combined with a second-moment analysis of Mossel, Weitz and Wormald which prove torpid mixing of the Glauber dynamics for sampling from the associated Gibbs distribution on almost every regular graph of degree Delta for the same range of lambda as in Sly's result. We extend Sly's result by improving upon the technical work of Mossel et al., via a more detailed analysis of independent sets in random regular graphs.
  • Given a Gaussian Markov random field, we consider the problem of selecting a subset of variables to observe which minimizes the total expected squared prediction error of the unobserved variables. We first show that finding an exact solution is NP-hard even for a restricted class of Gaussian Markov random fields, called Gaussian free fields, which arise in semi-supervised learning and computer vision. We then give a simple greedy approximation algorithm for Gaussian free fields on arbitrary graphs. Finally, we give a message passing algorithm for general Gaussian Markov random fields on bounded tree-width graphs.
  • We investigate the problem of strong spatial mixing of $q$-colorings on Bethe lattices. By analyzing the sum-product algorithm we establish the strong spatial mixing of $q$-colorings on $(b+1)$-regular Bethe lattices, for $q \geq 1+\lceil 1.764b \rceil$. We also establish the strong spatial mixing of $q$-colorings on binary trees, for $q=4$.
  • The sequential importance sampling (SIS) algorithm has gained considerable popularity for its empirical success. One of its noted applications is to the binary contingency tables problem, an important problem in statistics, where the goal is to estimate the number of 0/1 matrices with prescribed row and column sums. We give a family of examples in which the SIS procedure, if run for any subexponential number of trials, will underestimate the number of tables by an exponential factor. This result holds for any of the usual design choices in the SIS algorithm, namely the ordering of the columns and rows. These are apparently the first theoretical results on the efficiency of the SIS algorithm for binary contingency tables. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the SIS algorithm is efficient for row and column sums that are regular. Our work is a first step in determining the class of inputs for which SIS is effective.
  • This paper studies a Markov chain for phylogenetic reconstruction which uses a popular transition between tree topologies known as subtree pruning-and-regrafting (SPR). We analyze the Markov chain in the simpler setting that the generating tree consists of very short edge lengths, short enough so that each sample from the generating tree (or character in phylogenetic terminology) is likely to have only one mutation, and that there enough samples so that the data looks like the generating distribution. We prove in this setting that the Markov chain is rapidly mixing, i.e., it quickly converges to its stationary distribution, which is the posterior distribution over tree topologies. Our proofs use that the leading term of the maximum likelihood function of a tree T is the maximum parsimony score, which is the size of the minimum cut in T needed to realize single edge cuts of the generating tree. Our main contribution is a combinatorial proof that in our simplified setting, SPR moves are guaranteed to converge quickly to the maximum parsimony tree. Our results are in contrast to recent works showing examples with heterogeneous data (namely, the data is generated from a mixture distribution) where many natural Markov chains are exponentially slow to converge to the stationary distribution.
  • We investigate the complexity of counting Eulerian tours ({\sc #ET}) and its variations from two perspectives---the complexity of exact counting and the complexity w.r.t. approximation-preserving reductions (AP-reductions \cite{MR2044886}). We prove that {\sc #ET} is #P-complete even for planar 4-regular graphs. A closely related problem is that of counting A-trails ({\sc #A-trails}) in graphs with rotational embedding schemes (so called maps). Kotzig \cite{MR0248043} showed that {\sc #A-trails} can be computed in polynomial time for 4-regular plane graphs (embedding in the plane is equivalent to giving a rotational embedding scheme). We show that for 4-regular maps the problem is #P-hard. Moreover, we show that from the approximation viewpoint {\sc #A-trails} in 4-regular maps captures the essence of {\sc #ET}, that is, we give an AP-reduction from {\sc #ET} in general graphs to {\sc #A-trails} in 4-regular maps. The reduction uses a fast mixing result for a card shuffling problem \cite{MR2023023}. In order to understand whether #{\sc A-trails} in 4-regular maps can AP-reduce to #{\sc ET} in 4-regular graphs, we investigate a problem in which transitions in vertices are weighted (this generalizes both #{\sc A-trails} and #{\sc ET}). In the 4-regular case we show that {\sc A-trails} can be used to simulate any vertex weights and provide evidence that {\sc ET} can simulate only a limited set of vertex weights.
  • Given n elements with nonnegative integer weights w1,..., wn and an integer capacity C, we consider the counting version of the classic knapsack problem: find the number of distinct subsets whose weights add up to at most the given capacity. We give a deterministic algorithm that estimates the number of solutions to within relative error 1+-eps in time polynomial in n and 1/eps (fully polynomial approximation scheme). More precisely, our algorithm takes time O(n^3 (1/eps) log (n/eps)). Our algorithm is based on dynamic programming. Previously, randomized polynomial time approximation schemes were known first by Morris and Sinclair via Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques, and subsequently by Dyer via dynamic programming and rejection sampling.
  • We study the effect of boundary conditions on the relaxation time of the Glauber dynamics for the hard-core model on the tree. The hard-core model is defined on the set of independent sets weighted by a parameter $\lambda$, called the activity. The Glauber dynamics is the Markov chain that updates a randomly chosen vertex in each step. On the infinite tree with branching factor $b$, the hard-core model can be equivalently defined as a broadcasting process with a parameter $\omega$ which is the positive solution to $\lambda=\omega(1+\omega)^b$, and vertices are occupied with probability $\omega/(1+\omega)$ when their parent is unoccupied. This broadcasting process undergoes a phase transition between the so-called reconstruction and non-reconstruction regions at $\omega_r\approx \ln{b}/b$. Reconstruction has been of considerable interest recently since it appears to be intimately connected to the efficiency of local algorithms on locally tree-like graphs, such as sparse random graphs. In this paper we show that the relaxation time of the Glauber dynamics on regular $b$-ary trees $T_h$ of height $h$ and $n$ vertices, undergoes a phase transition around the reconstruction threshold. In particular, we construct a boundary condition for which the relaxation time slows down at the reconstruction threshold. More precisely, for any $\omega \le \ln{b}/b$, for $T_h$ with any boundary condition, the relaxation time is $\Omega(n)$ and $O(n^{1+o_b(1)})$. In contrast, above the reconstruction threshold we show that for every $\delta>0$, for $\omega=(1+\delta)\ln{b}/b$, the relaxation time on $T_h$ with any boundary condition is $O(n^{1+\delta + o_b(1)})$, and we construct a boundary condition where the relaxation time is $\Omega(n^{1+\delta/2 - o_b(1)})$.