• We present the discovery and measurements of a gravitationally lensed supernova (SN) behind the galaxy cluster MOO J1014+0038. Based on multi-band Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope (VLT) photometry of the supernova, and VLT spectroscopy of the host galaxy, we find a 97.5% probability that this SN is a SN Ia, and a 2.5% chance of a CC SN. Our typing algorithm combines the shape and color of the light curve with the expected rates of each SN type in the host galaxy. With a redshift of 2.2216, this is the highest redshift SN Ia discovered with a spectroscopic host-galaxy redshift. A further distinguishing feature is that the lensing cluster, at redshift 1.23, is the most distant to date to have an amplified SN. The SN lies in the middle of the color and light-curve shape distributions found at lower redshift, disfavoring strong evolution to z = 2.22. We estimate an amplification due to gravitational lensing of 2.8+0.6-0.5 (1.10 +- 0.23 mag)---compatible with the value estimated from the weak-lensing-derived mass and the mass-concentration relation from LambdaCDM simulations---making it the most amplified SN Ia discovered behind a galaxy cluster.
  • We present the first study of an Iwasawa-Taniguchi/X-ray Baldwin effect for Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN). We report a statistically significant anti-correlation between the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of the narrow core of the neutral Fe K$\alpha$ fluorescence emission line, ubiquitously observed in the reflection spectra of obscured AGN, and the mid-infrared 12$\,\mu$m continuum luminosity (taken as a proxy for the bolometric AGN luminosity). Our sample consists of 72 Compton-thick AGN selected from pointed and deep-field observations covering a redshift range of $z\sim0.0014-3.7$. We employ a Monte Carlo-based fitting method, which returns a Spearman's Rank correlation coefficient of $\rho=-0.28\pm0.12$, significant to 98.7% confidence. The best fit found is ${\rm log}({\rm EW}_{{\rm Fe\,K}\alpha})\,\propto\,-0.08\pm0.04\,{\rm log}(L_{12\,\mu{\rm m}})$, which is consistent with multiple studies of the X-ray Baldwin effect for unobscured and mildly obscured AGN. This is an unexpected result, as the Fe K$\alpha$ line is conventionally thought to originate from the same region as the underlying reflection continuum, which together constitute the reflection spectrum. We discuss the implications this could have if confirmed on larger samples, including a systematic underestimation of the line of sight X-ray obscuring column density and hence the intrinsic luminosities and growth rates for the most luminous AGN.
  • We report spectroscopic results from our 40-orbit $Hubble~Space~Telescope$ slitless grism spectroscopy program observing the 20 densest CARLA candidate galaxy clusters at $1.4 < z < 2.8$. These candidate rich structures, among the richest and most distant known, were identified on the basis of $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color from a $408~$hr multi-cycle $Spitzer$ program targeting $420$ distant radio-loud AGN. We report the spectroscopic confirmation of $16$ distant structures at $1.4 < z < 2.8$ associated with the targeted powerful high-redshift radio-loud AGN. We also report the serendipitous discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of seven additional structures at $0.87 < z < 2.12$ not associated with the targeted radio-loud AGN. We find that $10^{10} - 10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$ member galaxies of our confirmed CARLA structures form significantly fewer stars than their field counterparts at all redshifts within $1.4\leq z\leq 2$. We also observe higher star-forming activity in the structure cores up to $z = 2$, finding similar trends as cluster surveys at slightly lower redshifts ($1.0 < z < 1.5$). By design, our efficient strategy of obtaining just two grism orbits per field only obtains spectroscopic confirmation of emission-line galaxies. Deeper spectroscopy will be required to study the population of evolved, massive galaxies in these (forming) clusters. Lacking multi-band coverage of the fields, we adopt a very conservative approach of calling all confirmations "structures", although we note that a number of features are consistent with some of them being bona fide galaxy clusters. Together, this survey represents a unique and large homogenous sample of spectroscopically confirmed structures at high redshifts, potentially more than doubling the census of confirmed, massive clusters at $z > 1.4$.
  • Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are bright X-ray sources in nearby galaxies not associated with the central supermassive black hole. Their luminosities imply they are powered by either an extreme accretion rate onto a compact stellar remnant, or an intermediate mass ($\sim100-10^5$ M$_{\odot}$) black hole. The recent detection of coherent pulsations coming from three bright ULXs demonstrates that some of these sources are powered by accretion onto a neutron star, implying accretion rates significantly in excess of the Eddington limit, a high degree of geometric beaming, or both. The physical challenges associated with the high implied accretion rates can be mitigated if the neutron star surface field is high - in the magnetar regime ($10^{14}$ G), since this suppresses the electron scattering cross section, reducing the radiation pressure that chokes off accretion for high luminosities. One of the few ways to determine surface magnetic fields is through the detection of cyclotron resonance scattering features (CRSFs) produced by the transition of charged particles between quantized Landau levels. To date, CRSFs have only been detected in Galactic accreting pulsars. Here we present the detection at 3.8-{\sigma} significance of a strong absorption line at a rest-frame energy of 4.5 keV in the Chandra spectrum of a ULX in M51. We find that this feature is likely to be a CRSF produced by the strong magnetic field of a neutron star. Assuming scattering off electrons, the magnetic field strength is implied to be $\sim10^{11}$ G, however the line is narrower than any electron CRSFs previously observed, and assuming thermal broadening, the implied temperature is significantly cooler than the accretion disk or column. The line shape is, however, consistent with a proton resonance scattering feature, implying that the neutron star has a magnetic field near the surface of B$\sim10^{15}$ G.
  • We study the asymptotics as $p\uparrow 2$ of stationary $p$-harmonic maps $u_p\in W^{1,p}(M,S^1)$ from a compact manifold $M^n$ to $S^1$, satisfying the natural energy growth condition $$\int_M|du_p|^p=O(\frac{1}{2-p}).$$ Along a subsequence $p_j\to 2$, we show that the singular sets $Sing(u_{p_j})$ converge to the support of a stationary, rectifiable $(n-2)$-varifold $V$ of density $\Theta_{n-2}(\|V\|,\cdot)\geq 2\pi$, given by the concentrated part of the measure $$\mu=\lim_{j\to\infty}(2-p_j)|du_{p_j}|^{p_j}dv_g.$$ When $n=2$, we show moreover that the density of $\|V\|$ takes values in $2\pi\mathbb{N}$. Finally, on every compact manifold of dimension $n\geq 2$ we produce examples of nontrivial families $(1,2)\ni p\mapsto u_p\in W^{1,p}(M,S^1)$ of such maps via natural min-max constructions.
  • Quasars may have played a key role in limiting the stellar mass of massive galaxies. Identifying those quasars in the process of removing star formation fuel from their hosts is an exciting ongoing challenge in extragalactic astronomy. In this paper we present X-ray observations of eleven extremely red quasars (ERQs) with $L_{\rm bol}\sim 10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$ at $z=1.5-3.2$ with evidence for high-velocity ($v > 1000$ km s$^{-1}$) [OIII]$\lambda$5007\AA\ outflows. X-rays allow us to directly probe circumnuclear obscuration and to measure the instantaneous accretion luminosity. We detect ten out of eleven extremely red quasars available in targeted and archival data. Using a combination of X-ray spectral fitting and hardness ratios, we find that all of the ERQs show signs of absorption in the X-rays with inferred column densities of $N_{\rm H}\approx 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, including four Compton-thick candidates ($N_{\rm H} > 10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$). We stack the X-ray emission of the seven weakly detected sources, measuring an average column density of $N_{\rm H}\sim 8\times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$. The absorption-corrected (intrinsic) $2-10$ keV X-ray luminosity of the stack is $2.7\times 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$, consistent with X-ray luminosities of type 1 quasars of the same infrared luminosity. Thus, we find that ERQs are a highly obscured, borderline Compton-thick population, and based on optical and infrared data we suggest that these objects are partially hidden by their own equatorial outflows. However, unlike some quasars with known outflows, ERQs do not appear to be intrinsically underluminous in X-rays for their bolometric luminosity. Our observations indicate that low X-rays are not necessary to enable some types of radiatively driven winds.
  • Hot, Dust-Obscured Galaxies, or "Hot DOGs", are a rare, dusty, hyperluminous galaxy population discovered by the WISE mission. Predominantly at redshifts 2-3, they include the most luminous known galaxies in the universe. Their high luminosities likely come from accretion onto highly obscured super massive black holes (SMBHs). We have conducted a pilot survey to measure the SMBH masses of five z~2 Hot DOGs via broad H_alpha emission lines, using Keck/MOSFIRE and Gemini/FLAMINGOS-2. We detect broad H_alpha emission in all five Hot DOGs. We find substantial corresponding SMBH masses for these Hot DOGs (~ 10^{9} M_sun), and their derived Eddington ratios are close to unity. These z~2 Hot DOGs are the most luminous AGNs at given BH masses, suggesting they are accreting at the maximum rates for their BHs. A similar property is found for known z~6 quasars. Our results are consistent with scenarios in which Hot DOGs represent a transitional, high-accretion phase between obscured and unobscured quasars. Hot DOGs may mark a special evolutionary stage before the red quasar and optical quasar phases, and they may be present at other cosmic epochs.
  • We present a hard X-ray observation of the TeV gamma-ray binary candidate HESS J1832-093 coincident with supernova remnant (SNR) G22.7-0.2 using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Non-thermal X-ray emission from XMMU J183245-0921539, the X-ray source associated with HESS J1832-093, is detected up to ~30 keV and is well-described by an absorbed power-law model with the best-fit photon index $\Gamma = 1.5\pm0.1$. A re-analysis of archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data finds that the long-term X-ray flux increase of XMMU J183245-0921539 is $50^{+40}_{-20}$% (90% C.L.), much less than previously reported. A search for a pulsar spin period or binary orbit modulation yields no significant signal to a pulse fraction limit of fp < 19% in the range 4 ms < P < 40 ks. No red noise is detected in the FFT power spectrum to suggest active accretion from a binary system. While further evidence is required, we argue that the X-ray and gamma-ray properties of XMMU J183245-0921539 are most consistent with a non-accreting binary generating synchrotron X- rays from particle acceleration in the shock formed as a result of the pulsar and stellar wind collision. We also report on three nearby hard X-ray sources, one of which may be associated with diffuse emission from a fast-moving supernova fragment interacting with a dense molecular cloud.
  • We present the discovery of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) that is turning off and then on again in the z=0.06 galaxy SDSS J1354+1327. This episodic nuclear activity is the result of discrete accretion events, which could have been triggered by a past interaction with the companion galaxy that is currently located 12.5 kpc away. We originally targeted SDSS J1354+1327 because its Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum has narrow AGN emission lines that exhibit a velocity offset of 69 km s$^{-1}$ relative to systemic. To determine the nature of the galaxy and its velocity-offset emission lines, we observed SDSS J1354+1327 with Chandra/ACIS, Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3, Apache Point Observatory optical longslit spectroscopy, and Keck/OSIRIS integral-field spectroscopy. We find a ~10 kpc cone of photoionized gas south of the galaxy center and a ~1 kpc semi-spherical front of shocked gas, which is responsible for the velocity offset in the emission lines, north of the galaxy center. We interpret these two outflows as the result of two separate AGN accretion events; the first AGN outburst created the southern outflow, and then $<10^5$ yrs later the second AGN outburst launched the northern shock front. SDSS J1354+1327 is the galaxy with the strongest evidence for an AGN that has turned off and then on again, and it fits into the broader context of AGN flickering that includes observations of AGN light echoes.
  • We present results of a ground-based near-infrared campaign with Palomar TripleSpec, Keck NIRSPEC, and Gemini GNIRS to target two samples of reddened active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates from the 31 deg$^2$ Stripe 82 X-ray survey. One sample, which is $\sim$89\% complete to $K<16$ (Vega), consists of eight confirmed AGNs, four of which were identified with our follow-up program, and is selected to have red $R-K$ colors ($>4$, Vega). The fainter sample ($K>17$, Vega) represents a pilot program to follow-up four sources from a parent sample of 34 that are not detected in the single-epoch SDSS catalog and have {\it WISE} quasar colors. All twelve sources are broad-line AGNs (at least one permitted emission line has a FWHM exceeding 1300 km s$^{-1}$) and span a redshift range $0.59 < z < 2.5$. Half the ($R-K$)-selected AGNs have features in their spectra suggestive of outflows. When comparing these sources to a matched sample of blue Type 1 AGNs, we find the reddened AGNs are more distant ($z > 0.5$) and a greater percentage have high X-ray luminosities ($L_{\rm X,full} > 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$). Such outflows and high luminosities may be consistent with the paradigm that reddened broad-line AGNs represent a transitory phase in AGN evolution as described by the major merger model for black hole growth. Results from our pilot program demonstrate proof-of-concept that our selection technique is successful in discovering reddened quasars at $z > 1$ missed by optical surveys.
  • We have discovered heavy obscuration in the dual active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) source SWIFT J2028.5+2543 using Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). While an early XMM-Newton study suggested the emission was mainly from NGC 6921, the superior spatial resolution of NuSTAR above 10 keV resolves the Swift/BAT emission into two sources associated with the nearby galaxies MCG +04-48-002 and NGC 6921 (z = 0.014) with a projected separation of 25.3 kpc (91"). NuSTAR's sensitivity above 10 keV finds both are heavily obscured to Compton-thick levels (N H=(1-2)x10^24 cm-2) and contribute equally to the BAT detection ({L}10-50 {keV}{{int}}= 6x10^42 erg s-1). The observed luminosity of both sources is severely diminished in the 2-10 keV band, illustrating the importance of >10 keV surveys like those with NuSTAR and Swift/BAT. Compared to archival X-ray data, MCG +04-48-002 shows significant variability (>3) between observations. Despite being bright X-ray AGNs, they are difficult to detect using optical emission-line diagnostics because MCG +04-48-002 is identified as a starburst/composite because of the high rates of star formation from a luminous infrared galaxy while NGC 6921 is only classified as a LINER using line detection limits. SWIFT J2028.5+2543 is the first dual AGN resolved above 10 keV and is the second most heavily obscured dual AGN discovered to date in the X-rays other than NGC 6240.
  • Several recent studies have reported different intrinsic correlations between the AGN mid-IR luminosity ($L_{MIR}$) and the rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity ($L_{X}$) for luminous quasars. To understand the origin of the difference in the observed $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relations, we study a sample of 3,247 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 AGNs collected from Bo\"{o}tes, XMM-COSMOS, XMM-XXL-North, and the SDSS quasars in the Swift/XRT footprint spanning over four orders of magnitude in luminosity. We carefully examine how different observational constraints impact the observed $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relations, including the inclusion of X-ray non-detected objects, possible X-ray absorption in type 1 AGNs, X-ray flux limits, and star formation contamination. We find that the primary factor driving the different $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relations reported in the literature is the X-ray flux limits for different studies. When taking these effects into account, we find that the X-ray luminosity and mid-IR luminosity (measured at rest-frame $6\mu m$, or $L_{6\mu m}$) of our sample of type 1 AGNs follow a bilinear relation in the log-log plane: $\log L_X =(0.84\pm0.03)\times\log L_{6\mu m}/10^{45}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} + (44.60\pm0.01)$ for $L_{6\mu m} < 10^{44.79}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} $, and $\log L_X = (0.40\pm0.03)\times\log L_{6\mu m}/10^{45}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} +(44.51\pm0.01)$ for $L_{6\mu m} \geq 10^{44.79}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} $. This suggests that the luminous type 1 quasars have a shallower $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ correlation than the approximately linear relations found in local Seyfert galaxies. This result is consistent with previous studies reporting a luminosity-dependent $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relation, and implies that assuming a linear $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relation to infer the neutral gas column density for X-ray absorption might overestimate the column densities in luminous quasars.
  • We present the first catalog and data release of the Swift-BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS). We analyze optical spectra of the majority of AGN (77%, 641/836) detected based on their 14-195 keV emission in the 70-month Swift BAT all-sky catalog. This includes redshift determination, absorption and emission line measurements, and black hole mass and accretion rate estimates for the majority of obscured and un-obscured AGN (74%, 473/641) with 340 measured for the first time. With ~90% of sources at z<0.2, the survey represents a significant census of hard-X-ray selected AGN in the local universe. In this first catalog paper, we describe the spectroscopic observations and datasets, and our initial spectral analysis. The FWHM of the emission lines show broad agreement with the X-ray obscuration (~94%), such that Sy 1-1.8 have NH<10^21.9 cm^-2, and Seyfert 2, have NH>10^21.9 cm^-2. Seyfert 1.9 show a range of column densities. Compared to narrow line AGN in the SDSS, the X-ray selected AGN have a larger fraction of dusty host galaxies suggesting these types of AGN are missed in optical surveys. Using the most sensitive [OIII]/Hbeta and [NII]/Halpha emission line diagnostic, about half of the sources are classified as Seyferts, ~15% reside in dusty galaxies that lack an Hbeta detection, but for which the line upper limits imply either a Seyfert or LINER, ~15% are in galaxies with weak or no emission lines despite high quality spectra, and a few percent each are LINERS, composite galaxies, HII regions, or in known beamed AGN.
  • We report on two NuSTAR observations of the HMXB A 0535+26 taken toward the end of its normal 2015 outburst at very low $3-50$ keV luminosities of ${\sim}1.4\times10^{36}$ erg/s and ${\sim}5\times10^{35}$ erg/s which are complemented by 9 Swift observations. The data clearly confirm indications seen in earlier data that the source's spectral shape softens as it becomes fainter. The smooth, exponential rollover at high energies present in the first observation evolves to a much more abrupt steepening of the spectrum at $20-30$ keV. The continuum evolution can be well described with emission from a magnetized accretion column, modeled using the compmag model modified by an additional Gaussian emission component for the fainter observation. Between the two observations, the optical depth changes from $0.75\pm0.04$ to $0.56^{+0.01}_{-0.04}$, the electron temperature remains constant, and there is an indication that the column decreases in radius. Since the energy resolved pulse profiles remain virtually unchanged in shape between the two observations, the emission properties of the accretion column, however, reflect the same accretion regime. This conclusion is also confirmed by our result that the energy of the cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) at ${\sim}45$ keV is independent of the luminosity, implying that the magnetic field in the region in which the observed radiation is produced is the same in both observations. Finally, we also constrain the evolution of the continuum parameters with rotational phase of the neutron star. The width of the CRSF could only be constrained for the brighter observation. Based on Monte-Carlo simulations of CRSF formation in single accretion columns, its pulse phase dependence supports a simplified fan beam emission pattern. The evolution of the CRSF width is very similar to that of the CRSF depth, which is in disagreement with expectations.
  • There is a large degree of variety in the optical variability of quasars and it is unclear whether this is all attributable to a single (set of) physical mechanism(s). We present the results of a systematic search for major flares in AGN in the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey as part of a broader study into extreme quasar variability. Such flares are defined in a quantitative manner as being atop of the normal, stochastic variability of quasars. We have identified 51 events from over 900,000 known quasars and high probability quasar candidates, typically lasting 900 days and with a median peak amplitude of $\Delta m = 1.25$ mag. Characterizing the flare profile with a Weibull distribution, we find that nine of the sources are well described by a single-point single-lens model. This supports the proposal by Lawrence et al. (2016) that microlensing is a plausible physical mechanism for extreme variability. However, we attribute the majority of our events to explosive stellar-related activity in the accretion disk: superluminous supernovae, tidal disruption events, and mergers of stellar mass black holes.
  • We present HST WFC3 F160W imaging and infrared spectral energy distributions for twelve extremely luminous, obscured AGN at $1.8<z<2.7$, selected via "Hot, Dust Obscured" mid-infrared colors. Their infrared luminosities span $2-15\times10^{13}$L$_{\odot}$, making them among the most luminous objects in the Universe at $z\sim2$. In all cases the infrared emission is consistent with arising at least in most part from AGN activity. The AGN fractional luminosities are higher than those in either sub-millimeter galaxies, or AGN selected via other mid-infrared criteria. Adopting the $G$, M$_{20}$ and $A$ morphological parameters, together with traditional classification boundaries, infers that three quarters of the sample as mergers. Our sample do not, however, show any correlation between the considered morphological parameters and either infrared luminosity or AGN fractional luminosity. Moreover, their asymmetries and effective radii are distributed identically to those of massive galaxies at $z\sim2$. We conclude that our sample is not preferentially associated with mergers, though a significant merger fraction is still plausible. Instead, we propose that our sample are examples of the massive galaxy population at $z\sim2$ that harbor a briefly luminous, "flickering" AGN, and in which the $G$ and M$_{20}$ values have been perturbed, due to either the AGN, and/or the earliest formation stages of a bulge in an inside-out manner. Furthermore, we find that the mass assembly of the central black holes in our sample leads the mass assembly of any bulge component. Finally, we speculate that our sample represent a small fraction of the immediate antecedents of compact star-forming galaxies at $z\sim2$.
  • Understanding the origin of the flaring activity from the Galactic center supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*, is a major scientific goal of the NuSTAR Galactic plane survey campaign. We report on the data obtained between July 2012 and April 2015, including 27 observations on Sgr A* with a total exposure of ~ 1 Ms. We found a total of ten X-ray flares detected in the NuSTAR observation window, with luminosities in the range of $L_{3-79~keV}$~$(0.2-4.0) \times 10^{35}~erg~s^{-1}$. With this largest hard X-ray Sgr A* flare dataset to date, we studied the flare spectral properties. Seven flares are detected above 5{\sigma} significance, showing a range of photon indices ({\Gamma} ~ 2.0-2.8) with typical uncertainties of +/-0.5 (90% confidence level). We found no significant spectral hardening for brighter flares as indicated by a smaller sample. The accumulation of all the flare spectra in 1-79 keV can be well fit with an absorbed power-law model with {\Gamma}=2.2+/-0.1, and does not require the existence of a spectral break. The lack of variation in X-ray spectral index with luminosity would point to a single mechanism for the flares and is consistent with the synchrotron scenario. Lastly, we present the quiescent state spectrum of Sgr A*, and derived an upper limit on the quiescent luminosity of Sgr A* above 10 keV to be $L_{Xq, 10-79 keV}$ < $(2.9{\pm}0.2) \times 10^{34}~erg~s^{-1}$.
  • We study the observed relation between accretion rate (in terms of L/L_Edd) and shape of the hard X-ray spectral energy distribution (namely the photon index Gamma_X) for a large sample of 228 hard X-ray selected, low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGN), drawn from the Swift/BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS). This includes 30 AGN for which black hole mass (and therefore L/L_Edd) is measured directly through masers, spatially resolved gas or stellar dynamics, or reverberation mapping. The high quality and broad energy coverage of the data provided through BASS allow us to examine several alternative determinations of both Gamma_X and L/L_Edd. For the BASS sample as a whole, we find a statistically significant, albeit very weak correlation between Gamma_X and L/L_Edd. The best-fitting relations we find, Gamma_X=0.15 log(L/L_Edd)+const., are considerably shallower than those reported in previous studies. Moreover, we find no corresponding correlations among the subsets of AGN with different M_BH determination methodology. In particular, we find no robust evidence for a correlation when considering only those AGN with direct or single-epoch M_BH estimates. This latter finding is in contrast to several previous studies which focused on z>0.5 broad-line AGN. We discuss this tension and conclude that it can be partially accounted for if one adopts a simplified, power-law X-ray spectral model, combined with L/L_Edd estimates that are based on the continuum emission and on single-epoch broad line spectroscopy in the optical regime. We finally highlight the limitations on using Gamma_X as a probe of supermassive black hole evolution in deep extragalactic X-ray surveys.
  • We measure the Planck cluster mass bias using dynamical mass measurements based on velocity dispersions of a subsample of 17 Planck-detected clusters. The velocity dispersions were calculated using redshifts determined from spectra obtained at Gemini observatory with the GMOS multi-object spectrograph. We correct our estimates for effects due to finite aperture, Eddington bias and correlated scatter between velocity dispersion and the Planck mass proxy. The result for the mass bias parameter, $(1-b)$, depends on the value of the galaxy velocity bias $b_v$ adopted from simulations: $(1-b)=(0.51\pm0.09) b_v^3$. Using a velocity bias of $b_v=1.08$ from Munari et al., we obtain $(1-b)=0.64\pm 0.11$, i.e, an error of 17% on the mass bias measurement with 17 clusters. This mass bias value is consistent with most previous weak lensing determinations. It lies within $1\sigma$ of the value needed to reconcile the Planck cluster counts with the Planck primary CMB constraints. We emphasize that uncertainty in the velocity bias severely hampers precision measurements of the mass bias using velocity dispersions. On the other hand, when we fix the Planck mass bias using the constraints from Penna-Lima et al., based on weak lensing measurements, we obtain a positive velocity bias $b_v \gtrsim 0.9$ at $3\sigma$.
  • A key goal of the Stage IV dark energy experiments Euclid, LSST and WFIRST is to measure the growth of structure with cosmic time from weak lensing analysis over large regions of the sky. Weak lensing cosmology will be challenging: in addition to highly accurate galaxy shape measurements, statistically robust and accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) estimates for billions of faint galaxies will be needed in order to reconstruct the three-dimensional matter distribution. Here we present an overview of and initial results from the Complete Calibration of the Color-Redshift Relation (C3R2) survey, designed specifically to calibrate the empirical galaxy color-redshift relation to the Euclid depth. These redshifts will also be important for the calibrations of LSST and WFIRST. The C3R2 survey is obtaining multiplexed observations with Keck (DEIMOS, LRIS, and MOSFIRE), the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC; OSIRIS), and the Very Large Telescope (VLT; FORS2 and KMOS) of a targeted sample of galaxies most important for the redshift calibration. We focus spectroscopic efforts on under-sampled regions of galaxy color space identified in previous work in order to minimize the number of spectroscopic redshifts needed to map the color-redshift relation to the required accuracy. Here we present the C3R2 survey strategy and initial results, including the 1283 high confidence redshifts obtained in the 2016A semester and released as Data Release 1.
  • The relativistic jets created by some active galactic nuclei are important agents of AGN feedback. In spite of this, our understanding of what produces these jets is still incomplete. X-ray observations, which can probe the processes operating in the central regions in immediate vicinity of the supermassive black hole, the presumed jet launching point, are potentially particularly valuable in illuminating the jet formation process. Here, we present the hard X-ray NuSTAR observations of the radio-loud quasar 4C 74.26 in a joint analysis with quasi-simultaneous, soft X-ray Swift observations. Our spectral analysis reveals a high-energy cut-off of 183$_{-35}^{+51}$ keV and confirms the presence of ionized reflection in the source. From the average spectrum we detect that the accretion disk is mildly recessed with an inner radius of $R_\mathrm{in}=4-180\,R_\mathrm{g}$. However, no significant evolution of the inner radius is seen during the three months covered by our NuSTAR campaign. This lack of variation could mean that the jet formation in this radio-loud quasar differs from what is observed in broad-line radio galaxies.
  • CRTS J084133.15+200525.8 is an optically bright quasar at z=2.345 that has shown extreme spectral variability over the past decade. Photometrically, the source had a visual magnitude of V~17.3 between 2002 and 2008. Then, over the following five years, the source slowly brightened by approximately one magnitude, to V~16.2. Only ~1 in 10,000 quasars show such extreme variability, as quantified by the extreme parameters derived for this quasar assuming a damped random walk model. A combination of archival and newly acquired spectra reveal the source to be an iron low-ionization broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar with extreme changes in its absorption spectrum. Some absorption features completely disappear over the 9 years of optical spectra, while other features remain essentially unchanged. We report the first definitive redshift for this source, based on the detection of broad H-alpha in a Keck/MOSFIRE spectrum. Absorption systems separated by several 1000 km/s in velocity show coordinated weakening in the depths of their troughs as the continuum flux increases. We interpret the broad absorption line variability to be due to changes in photoionization, rather than due to motion of material along our line of sight. This source highlights one sort of rare transition object that astronomy will now be finding through dedicated time-domain surveys.
  • We establish a new estimate for the Ginzburg-Landau energies $E_{\epsilon}(u)=\int_M\frac{1}{2}|du|^2+\frac{1}{4\epsilon^2}(1-|u|^2)^2$ of complex-valued maps $u$ on a compact, oriented manifold $M$ with $b_1(M)\neq 0$, obtained by decomposing the harmonic component $h_u$ of the one-form $ju:=u^1du^2-u^2du^1$ into an integral and fractional part. We employ this estimate to show that, for critical points $u_{\epsilon}$ of $E_{\epsilon}$ arising from the two-parameter min-max construction considered by the author in previous work, a nontrivial portion of the energy must concentrate on a stationary, rectifiable $(n-2)$-varifold as $\epsilon\to 0$.
  • We present results from a NuSTAR observation of the Crab made at a large off-axis angle of 1.5\degree. At these angles X-rays do not pass through the optics, but rather illuminate the detectors directly due to incomplete baffling. Due to the simplicity of the instrument response in this configuration and the good absolute calibration of the detectors, we are able to measure the absolute intrinsic flux of the Crab to better than 4%. We find the spectral parameters of the powerlaw to be Gamma=2.106 +/- 0.006, N=9.71 +/-0.16, in agreement with the values measured 42 years ago by Toor & Seward (1974). This suggests that the observed variability of the Crab is not part of a long term trend, but instead results from fluctuations around a steady mean. The NuSTAR observation also enabled improved measurement of the detector absorption parameters without the added complications of the mirror response.
  • We present a catalog of hard X-ray sources in a square-degree region surveyed by NuSTAR in the direction of the Norma spiral arm. This survey has a total exposure time of 1.7 Ms, and typical and maximum exposure depths of 50 ks and 1 Ms, respectively. In the area of deepest coverage, sensitivity limits of $5\times10^{-14}$ and $4\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the 3-10 and 10-20 keV bands, respectively, are reached. Twenty-eight sources are firmly detected and ten are detected with low significance; eight of the 38 sources are expected to be active galactic nuclei. The three brightest sources were previously identified as a low-mass X-ray binary, high-mass X-ray binary, and pulsar wind nebula. Based on their X-ray properties and multi-wavelength counterparts, we identify the likely nature of the other sources as two colliding wind binaries, three pulsar wind nebulae, a black hole binary, and a plurality of cataclysmic variables (CVs). The CV candidates in the Norma region have plasma temperatures of $\approx$10-20 keV, consistent with the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission spectrum but lower than temperatures of CVs near the Galactic Center. This temperature difference may indicate that the Norma region has a lower fraction of intermediate polars relative to other types of CVs compared to the Galactic Center. The NuSTAR log$N$-log$S$ distribution in the 10-20 keV band is consistent with the distribution measured by Chandra at 2-10 keV if the average source spectrum is assumed to be a thermal model with $kT\approx15$~keV, as observed for the CV candidates.