• We present a high-resolution, near-IR spectroscopic study of multiple outflows in the LkH$\alpha$ 234 star formation region using the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS). Spectral mapping over the blueshifted emission of HH 167 allowed us to distinguish at least three separate, spatially overlapped, outflows in H${_2}$ and [Fe II] emission. We show that the H${_2}$ emission represents not a single jet, but complex multiple outflows driven by three known embedded sources: MM1, VLA 2, and VLA 3. There is a redshifted H${_2}$ outflow at a low velocity, $\VLSR$ $<$ $+$50 {\kms}, with respect to the systemic velocity of $\VLSR$ $=$ $-$11.5 {\kms}, that coincides with the H${_2}$O masers seen in earlier radio observations two arcseconds southwest of VLA 2. We found that the previously detected [Fe II] jet with $|$$\VLSR$$|$ $>$ 100 {\kms} driven by VLA 3B is also detected in H${_2}$ emission, and confirm that this jet has a position angle about 240$\degree$. Spectra of the redshifted knots at 14$\arcsec$$-$65$\arcsec$ northeast of LkH$\alpha$ 234 are presented for the first time. These spectra also provide clues to the existence of multiple outflows. We detected high-velocity (50$-$120 {\kms}) H${_2}$ gas in the multiple outflows around LkH$\alpha$ 234. Since these gases move at speeds well over the dissociation velocity ($>$ 40 {\kms}), the emission must originate from the jet itself rather than H${_2}$ gas in the ambient medium. Also, position-velocity diagrams and excitation diagram indicate that emission from knot C in HH 167 come from two different phenomena, shocks and photodissociation.
  • At 60 pc, TW Hydra (TW Hya) is the closest example of a star with a gas-rich protoplanetary disk, though TW Hya may be relatively old (3-15 Myr). As such, TW Hya is especially appealing to test our understanding of the interplay between stellar and disk evolution. We present a high-resolution near-infrared spectrum of TW Hya obtained with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) to re-evaluate the stellar parameters of TW Hya. We compare these data to synthetic spectra of magnetic stars produced by MoogStokes, and use sensitive spectral line profiles to probe the effective temperature, surface gravity, and magnetic field. A model with T_eff= 3800 K, log g=4.2, and B=3.0 kG best fits the near-infrared spectrum of TW Hya. These results correspond to a spectral type of M0.5 and an age of 8 Myr, which is well past the median life of gaseous disks.
  • We present a deep near-infrared spectrum of the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region (PDR) taken with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory. IGRINS has high spectral resolution (R~45000) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 microns), enabling us to detect 87 emission lines from rovibrationally excited molecular hydrogen (H_2) that arise from transitions out of 69 upper rovibration levels of the electronic ground state. These levels cover a large range of rotational and vibrational quantum numbers and excitation energies, making them an excellent probe of the excitation mechanisms of H_2 and physical conditions within the PDR. The Orion Bar PDR is thought to consist of cooler high density clumps or filaments (T=50-250 K, n_H = 10^5 - 10^7 cm^-3) embedded in a warmer lower density medium (T=250-1000 K, n_H=10^4 - 10^5 cm^-3). We fit a grid of simple constant-temperature and constant-density Cloudy models, which recreate the observed H_2 level populations well, to constrain the temperature to a range of 600 to 650 K and the density to n_H = 2.5 x 10^3 to 10^4 cm^-3. The best fit model gives T = 625 K and n_H = 5x10^3 cm^-3. This well constrained warm temperature is consistent with kinetic temperatures found by other studies for the Orion Bar's lower density medium. However, the range of densities well fit by the model grid is marginally lower than those reported by other studies. We could be observing lower density gas than the surrounding medium, or perhaps a density-sensitive parameter in our models is not properly estimated.
  • We have analyzed the temperature, velocity and density of H2 gas in NGC 7023 with a high-resolution near-infrared spectrum of the northwestern filament of the reflection nebula. By observing NGC 7023 in the H and K bands at R ~ 45,000 with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS), we detected 68 H2 emission lines within the 1" x 15" slit. The diagnostic ratios of 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(1) is 0.41-0.56. In addition, the estimated ortho-to-para ratios (OPR) is 1.63-1.82, indicating that the H2 emission transitions in the observed region arises mostly from gas excited by UV fluorescence. Gradients in the temperature, velocity, and OPR within the observed area imply motion of the photodissociation region (PDR) relative to the molecular cloud. In addition, we derive the column density of H2 from the observed emission lines and compare these results with PDR models in the literature covering a range of densities and incident UV field intensities. The notable difference between PDR model predictions and the observed data, in high rotational J levels of v = 1, is that the predicted formation temperature for newly-formed H2 should be lower than that of the model predictions. To investigate the density distribution, we combine pixels in 1" x 1" areas and derive the density distribution at the 0.002 pc scale. The derived gradient of density suggests that NGC 7023 has a clumpy structure, including a high clump density of ~10^5 cm^-3 with a size smaller than ~5 x 10^-3 pc embedded in lower density regions of 10^3-10^4 cm^-3.
  • The abundance of H2 in molecular clouds, relative to the commonly used tracer CO, has only been measured toward a few embedded stars, which may be surrounded by atypical gas. We present observations of near-infrared absorption by H2, CO, and dust toward stars behind molecular clouds, providing a representative sample of these molecules in cold molecular gas, primarily in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. We find N_H2/A_V ~ 1.0x10^21 cm^-2, N_CO/A_V ~ 1.5x10^17 cm^-2 (1.8x10^17 including solid CO), and N_H2/N_CO ~ 6000. The measured N_H2/N_CO ratio is consistent with that toward embedded stars in various molecular clouds, but both are less than that derived from mm-wave observations of CO and star counts. The difference apparently results from the higher directly measured N_CO/A_V ratio.
  • We report a study of the three-dimensional (3D) outflow structure of a 15$\arcsec$ $\times$ 13$\arcsec$ area around H$_{2}$ peak 1 in Orion KL with slit-scan observations (13 slits) using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph. The datacubes, with high velocity-resolution ($\sim$ 7.5 {\kms}) provide high contrast imaging within ultra-narrow bands, and enable the detection of the main stream of the previously reported H$_{2}$ outflow fingers. We identified 31 distinct fingers in H$_{2}$ 1$-$0 S(1) $\lambda$2.122 $\micron$ emission. The line profile at each finger shows multiple-velocity peaks with a strong low-velocity component around the systemic velocity at ${\VLSR}$ = $+$8 {\kms} and high velocity emission ($|$${\VLSR}$$|$ = 45$-$135 {\kms}) indicating a typical bow-shock. The observed radial velocity gradients of $\sim$ 4 {\kms} arcsec$^{-1}$ agree well with the velocities inferred from large-scale proper motions, where the projected motion is proportional to distance from a common origin. We construct a conceptual 3D map of the fingers with the estimated inclination angles of 57$\degree$$-$74$\degree$. The extinction difference ($\Delta$$A_{\rm v}$ $>$ 10 mag) between blueshifted and redshifted fingers indicates high internal extinction. The extinction, the overall angular spread and scale of the flow argue for an ambient medium with very high density (10$^{5}$$-$10$^{6}$ cm$^{-3}$), consistent with molecular line observations of the OMC core. The radial velocity gradients and the 3D distributions of the fingers together support the hypothesis of simultaneous, radial explosion of the Orion KL outflow.
  • We confirm and characterize a close-in ($P_{\rm{orb}}$ = 5.425 days), super-Neptune sized ($5.04^{+0.34}_{-0.37}$ Earth radii) planet transiting K2-33 (2MASS J16101473-1919095), a late-type (M3) pre-main sequence (11 Myr-old) star in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association. The host star has the kinematics of a member of the Upper Scorpius OB association, and its spectrum contains lithium absorption, an unambiguous sign of youth (<20 Myr) in late-type dwarfs. We combine photometry from K2 and the ground-based MEarth project to refine the planet's properties and constrain the host star's density. We determine \name's bolometric flux and effective temperature from moderate resolution spectra. By utilizing isochrones that include the effects of magnetic fields, we derive a precise radius (6-7%) and mass (16%) for the host star, and a stellar age consistent with the established value for Upper Scorpius. Follow-up high-resolution imaging and Doppler spectroscopy confirm that the transiting object is not a stellar companion or a background eclipsing binary blended with the target. The shape of the transit, the constancy of the transit depth and periodicity over 1.5 years, and the independence with wavelength rules out stellar variability, or a dust cloud or debris disk partially occulting the star as the source of the signal; we conclude it must instead be planetary in origin. The existence of K2-33b suggests close-in planets can form in situ or migrate within $\sim 10$ Myr, e.g., via interactions with a disk, and that long-timescale dynamical migration such as by Lidov-Kozai or planet-planet scattering is not responsible for all short-period planets.
  • The ~2 Myr old classical T Tauri star CI Tau shows periodic variability in its radial velocity (RV) variations measured at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We find that these observations are consistent with a massive planet in a ~9-day period orbit. These results are based on 71 IR RV measurements of this system obtained over 5 years, and on 26 optical RV measurements obtained over 9 years. CI Tau was also observed photometrically in the optical on 34 nights over ~one month in 2012. The optical RV data alone are inadequate to identify an orbital period, likely the result of star spot and activity induced noise for this relatively small dataset. The infrared RV measurements reveal significant periodicity at ~9 days. In addition, the full set of optical and IR RV measurements taken together phase coherently and with equal amplitudes to the ~9 day period. Periodic radial velocity signals can in principle be produced by cool spots, hot spots, and reflection of the stellar spectrum off the inner disk, in addition to resulting from a planetary companion. We have considered each of these and find the planet hypothesis most consistent with the data. The radial velocity amplitude yields an Msin(i) of ~8.1 M_Jup; in conjunction with a 1.3 mm continuum emission measurement of the circumstellar disk inclination from the literature, we find a planet mass of ~11.3 M_Jup, assuming alignment of the planetary orbit with the disk.
  • We have detected molecular and atomic line emission from the hot and warm disks of two Class I sources, IRAS 03445+3242 and IRAS 04239+2436 using the high resolution Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). CO overtone band transitions and near-IR lines of Na I and Ca I, all in emission, trace the hot inner disk while CO rovibrational absorption spectra of the first overtone transition trace the warm gas within the inner few AU of the disk. The emission-line profiles for both sources show evidence for Keplerian disks. A thin Keplerian disk with power-law temperature and column density profiles with a projected rotational velocity of $\sim$60--75 km s$^{-1}$ and a gas temperature of $\sim$3500 K at the innermost annulus can reproduce the CO overtone band emission. Na I and Ca I emission lines also arise from this disk, but they show complicated line features possibly affected by photospheric absorption lines. Multi-epoch observations show asymmetric variations of the line profiles on one-year (CO overtone bandhead and atomic lines for IRAS 03445+3242) or on one-day (atomic lines for IRAS 04239+2436) time scales, implying non-axisymmetric features in disks. The narrow CO rovibrational absorption spectra ($v$=0$\rightarrow$2) indicate that both warm ($>$ 150 K) and cold ($\sim$20--30 K) CO gas are present along the line of sight to the inner disk. This study demonstrates the power of IGRINS as a tool for studies of the sub-AU scale hot and AU-scale warm protoplanetary disks with its simultaneous coverage of the full H and K bands with high spectral resolution ($R$= 45,000) allowing many aspects of the sources to be investigated at once.
  • Studying the properties of young planetary systems can shed light on how the dynamics and structure of planets evolve during their most formative years. Recent K2 observations of nearby young clusters (10-800 Myr) have enabled the discovery of such planetary systems. Here we report the discovery of a Neptune-sized planet transiting an M4.5 dwarf (K2-25) in the Hyades cluster (650-800 Myr). The lightcurve shows a strong periodic signal at 1.88 days, which we attribute to spot coverage and rotation. We confirm the planet host is a member of the Hyades by measuring the radial velocity of the system with the high-resolution near-infrared spectrograph IGRINS. This enables us to calculate a distance based on EPIC 210490365's kinematics and membership to the Hyades, which in turn provides a stellar radius and mass to 5-10%, better than what is currently possible for most Kepler M dwarfs (12-20%). We use the derived stellar density as a prior on fitting the K2 transit photometry, which provides weak constraints on eccentricity. Utilizing a combination of adaptive optics imaging and high-resolution spectra we rule out the possibility that the signal is due to a bound or background eclipsing binary, confirming the transits' planetary origin. EPIC 210490365b has a radius ($3.43^{+0.95}_{-0.31}$R$_{E}$) much larger than older Kepler planets with similar orbital periods (3.484 days) and host-star masses (0.29$M_{\odot}$). This suggests that close-in planets lose some of their atmospheres past the first few hundred Myr. Additional transiting planets around the Hyades, Pleiades, and Praesepe clusters from K2 will help confirm if this planet is atypical or representative of other close-in planets of similar age.
  • From high resolution (R = 45,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N > 400) spectra gathered with the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) in the H and K photometric bands, we have derived elemental abundances of two bright, well-known metal-poor halo stars: the red giant HD 122563 and the subgiant HD 140283. Since these stars have metallicities approaching [Fe/H] = -3, their absorption features are generally very weak. Neutral-species lines of Mg, Si, S and Ca are detectable, as well as those of the light odd-Z elements Na and Al. The derived IR-based abundances agree with those obtained from optical-wavelength spectra. For Mg and Si the abundances from the infrared transitions are improvements to those derived from shorter wavelength data. Many useful OH and CO lines can be detected in the IGRINS HD 122563 spectrum, from which derived O and C abundances are consistent to those obtained from the traditional [O I] and CH features. IGRINS high resolutions H- and K-band spectroscopy offers promising ways to determine more reliable abundances for additional metal-poor stars whose optical features are either not detectable, or too weak, or are based on lines with analytical difficulties.
  • We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star Lk{\Ha} 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). Previous studies indicate that the region around Lk{\Ha} 234 is complex, with several embedded YSOs and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H$-$ and K$-$band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 {\FeII} and 14 H$_{2}$ emission lines. We revealed a new {\FeII} jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position-velocity diagrams of H$_{2}$ 1$-$0 S(1) $\lambda$2.122 $\micron$ line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H$_{2}$ emission at the systemic velocity (V$_{LSR}$ $=$ $-$10.2 {\kms}) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity, {\FeII} emission lines are detected at farther from the systemic velocity, at V$_{LSR}$ $=$ $-$100 $-$ $-$130 {\kms}. We infer that the H$_{2}$ emission arises from shocked gas entrained by a high-velocity outflow. Population diagrams of H$_{2}$ lines imply that the gas is thermalized at a temperature of 2,500 $-$ 3,000 K and the emission results from shock excitation.
  • Silicon direct bonding offers flexibility in the design and development of Si optics by allowing manufacturers to combine subcomponents with a potentially lossless and mechanically stable interface. The bonding process presents challenges in meeting the requirements for optical performance because air gaps at the Si interface cause large Fresnel reflections. Even small (35 nm) gaps reduce transmission through a direct bonded Si compound optic by 4% at $\lambda = 1.25 \; \mu$m at normal incidence. We describe a bond inspection method that makes use of precision slit spectroscopy to detect and measure gaps as small as 14 nm. Our method compares low finesse Fabry-P\'{e}rot models to high precision measurements of transmission as a function of wavelength. We demonstrate the validity of the approach by measuring bond gaps of known depths produced by microlithography.
  • We present an exposure-time calculator (ETC) for the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). The signal and noise values are calculated by taking into account the telluric background emission and absorption, the emission and transmission of the telescope and instrument optics, and the dark current and read noise of the infrared detector arrays. For the atmospheric transmission, we apply models based on the amount of precipitable water vapor along the line of sight to the target. The ETC produces the expected signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for each resolution element, given the exposure-time and number of exposures. In this paper, we compare the simulated continuum S/N for the early-type star HD 124683 and the late-type star GSS 32, and the simulated emission line S/N for the H2 rovibrational transitions from the Iris Nebula NGC 7023 with the observed IGRINS spectra. The simulated S/N from the ETC is overestimated by 40-50% for the sample continuum targets.
  • We present medium resolution (R = 5000-6000) spectra in the near-infrared band, 1.4-1.8 microns, for template stars in G, K, and M types observed by the echelle spectrometer, IRCS, at the SUBARU 8.2 m telescope. The identification of lines is based on the spectra of Arcturus (K2 III) in the literature. We measured the equivalent of widths and compared our results to those of Meyer et al. (1998). We conclude that our spectral resolution (R = 6000) data can investigate more accurately the properties of lines in stellar spectra. The library of the template stellar spectra in ASCII format are available for download on the World Wide Web.
  • We report optical (6150 Ang) and K-band (2.3 micron) radial velocities obtained over two years for the pre-main sequence weak-lined T Tauri star Hubble I 4. We detect periodic and near-sinusoidal radial velocity variations at both wavelengths, with a semi-amplitude of 1395\pm94 m/s in the optical and 365\pm80 m/s in the infrared. The lower velocity amplitude at the longer wavelength, combined with bisector analysis and spot modeling, indicates that there are large, cool spots on the stellar surface that are causing the radial velocity modulation. The radial velocities maintain phase coherence over hundreds of days suggesting that the starspots are long-lived. This is one of the first active stars where the spot-induced velocity modulation has been resolved in the infrared.
  • We report on initial results from a Spitzer program to search for very low-mass brown dwarfs in Ophiuchus. This program is an extension of an earlier study by Allers et al. which had resulted in an extraordinary success rate, 18 confirmed out of 19 candidates. Their program combined near-infrared and Spitzer photom- etry to identify objects with very cool photospheres together with circumstellar disk emission to indicate youth. Our new program has obtained deep IRAC pho- tometry of a 0.5 deg2 field that was part of the original Allers et al. study. We report 18 new candidates whose luminosities extend down to 10-4 L\cdot which sug- gests masses down to ~ 2 MJ if confirmed. We describe our selection techniques, likely contamination issues, and follow-on photometry and spectroscopy that are in progress.
  • We present high resolution (R=80,000) spectroscopy of [NeII] emission from two young stars, GM Aur and AA Tau, which have moderate to high inclinations. The emission from both sources appears centered near the stellar velocity and is broader than the [NeII] emission measured previously for the face-on disk system TW Hya. These properties are consistent with a disk origin for the [NeII] emission we detect, with disk rotation (rather than photoevaporation or turbulence in a hot disk atmosphere) playing the dominant role in the origin of the line width. In the non-face-on systems, the [NeII] emission is narrower than the CO fundamental emission from the same sources. If the widths of both diagnostics are dominated by Keplerian rotation, this suggests that the [NeII] emission arises from larger disk radii on average than does the CO emission. The equivalent width of the [NeII] emission we detect is less than that of the spectrally unresolved [NeII] feature in the Spitzer spectra of the same sources. Variability in the [NeII] emission or the mid-infrared continuum, a spatially extended [NeII] component, or a very (spectrally) broad [NeII] component might account for the difference in the equivalent widths.
  • We present high spatial and spectral resolution observations of sixteen Galactic compact and ultracompact H II regions in the [Ne II] 12.8 microns fine structure line. The small thermal width of the neon line and the high dynamic range of the maps provide an unprecedented view of the kinematics of compact and ultracompact H II regions. These observations solidify an emerging picture of the structure of ultracompact H II regions suggested in our earlier studies of G29.96-0.02 and Mon R2 IRS1; systematic surface flows, rather than turbulence or bulk expansion, dominate the gas motions in the H II regions. The observations show that almost all of the sources have significant (5-20 km/s) velocity gradients and that most of the sources are limb-brightened. In many cases, the velocity pattern implies tangential flow along a dense shell of ionized gas. None of the observed sources clearly fits into the categories of filled expanding spheres, expanding shells, filled blister flows, or cometary H II regions formed by rapidly moving stars. Instead, the kinematics and morphologies of most of the sources lead to a picture of H II regions confined to the edges of cavities created by stellar wind ram pressure and flowing along the cavity surfaces. In sources where the radio continuum and [Ne II] morphologies agree, the majority of the ionic emission is blue-shifted relative to nearby molecular gas. This is consistent with sources lying on the near side of their natal clouds being less affected by extinction and with gas motions being predominantly outward, as is expected for pressure-driven flows.
  • We argue that classical T Tauri stars (cTTs) possess significant non- photospheric excess in the J and H bands. We first show that normalizing the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of cTTs to the J-band leads to a poor fit of the optical fluxes, while normalizing the SEDs to the Ic-band produces a better fit to the optical bands and in many cases reveals the presence of a considerable excess at J and H. NIR spectroscopic veiling measurements from the literature support this result. We find that J and H-band excesses correlate well with the K-band excess, and that the J-K and H-K colors of the excess emission are consistent with that of a black body at the dust sublimation temperature (~ 1500-2000 K). We propose that this near-IR excess originates at a hot inner rim, analogous to those suggested to explain the near-IR bump in the SEDs of Herbig Ae/Be stars. To test our hypothesis, we use the model presented by Dullemond et al. (2001) to fit the photometry data between 0.5 um and 24 um of 10 cTTs associated with the Chamaeleon II molecular cloud. The models that best fit the data are those where the inner radius of the disk is larger than expected for a rim in thermal equilibrium with the photospheric radiation field alone. In particular, we find that large inner rims are necessary to account for the mid infrared fluxes (3.6-8.0 um) obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Finally, we argue that deriving the stellar luminosities of cTTs by making bolometric corrections to the J-band fluxes systematically overestimates these luminosities. The overestimated luminosities translate into underestimated ages when the stars are placed in the H-R diagram. Thus, the results presented herein have important implications for the dissipation timescale of inner accretion disks.
  • High spectral and spatial resolution, mid-infrared fine structure line observations toward two ultracompact HII (UCHII) regions (G29.96 -0.02 and Mon R2) allow us to study the structure and kinematics of cometary UCHII regions. In our earlier study of Mon R2, we showed that highly organized mass motions accounted for most of the velocity structure in that UCHII region. In this work, we show that the kinematics in both Mon R2 and G29.96 are consistent with motion along an approximately paraboloidal shell. We model the velocity structure seen in our mapping data and test the stellar wind bow shock model for such paraboloidal like flows. The observations and the simulation indicate that the ram pressures of the stellar wind and ambient interstellar medium cause the accumulated mass in the bow shock to flow along the surface of the shock. A relaxation code reproduces the mass flow's velocity structure as derived by the analytical solution. It further predicts that the pressure gradient along the flow can accelerate ionized gas to a speed higher than that of the moving star. In the original bow shock model, the star speed relative to the ambient medium was considered to be the exit speed of ionized gas in the shell.
  • Ground state rotational lines of H2 are good temperature probes of moderately hot (200-1000 K) gas. The low A-values of these lines result in low critical densities while ensuring that the lines are optically thin. ISO observations of H2 rotational lines in PDRs reveal large quantities of warm gas that are difficult to explain via current models, but the spatial resolution of ISO does not resolve the temperature structure of the warm gas. We present and discuss high spatial resolution observations of H2 rotational line emission from the Orion Bar.
  • We have mapped 63 regions forming high-mass stars in CS J=5-4 using the CSO. The CS peak position was observed in C34S J=5-4 towards 57 cores and in 13CS J=5-4 towards the 9 brightest cores. The sample is a subset of a sample originally selected toward water masers; the selection on maser sources should favor sources in an early stage of evolution. The integrated intensity of CS J=5-4 correlates very well with the dust continuum emission at 350 microns. The distributions of size, virial mass, surface density, and luminosity are all peaked with a few cores skewed towards much larger values than the mean. We find a weak correlation between C34S linewidth and size, consistent with Dv ~ R^{0.3}. The linewidths are much higher than would be predicted by the usual relations between linewidth and size determined from regions of lower mass. These regions are very turbulent. The derived virial mass agrees within a factor of 2 to 3 with mass estimates from dust emission at 350 microns after corrections for the density structure are accounted for. The resulting cumulative mass spectrum of cores above 1000 solar masses can be approximated by a power law with a slope of about -0.9, steeper than that of clouds measured with tracers of lower density gas and close to that for the total masses of stars in OB associations. The median turbulent pressures are comparable to those in UCHII regions, and the pressures at small radii are similar to those in hypercompact-HII regions (P/k ~ 10^{10} K cm^{-3}). The filling factors for dense gas are substantial, and the median abundance of CS is about 10^{-9}. The ratio of bolometric luminosity to virial mass is much higher than the value found for molecular clouds as a whole, and the correlation of luminosity with mass is tighter. (Abridged).
  • We have carried out an in-depth study of the peripheral region of the molecular cloud L1204/S140, where the far ultraviolet radiation and the density are relatively low. Our observations test theories of photon-dominated regions (PDRs) in a regime that has been little explored. CII 158 micron and OI 63 micron lines are detected by ISO at all 16 positions along a 1-dimensional cut in right ascension. Emission from molecular hydrogen rotational transitions, at 28 and 17 micron, was also detected at several positions. The CII, OI, and molecular hydrogen intensities along the cut show much less spatial variation than do the rotational lines of CO and other CO isotopes. The average CII and OI intensities and their ratio are consistent with models of PDRs with low FUV radiation (Go) and density. The best-fitting model has Go about 15 and density, n about 1000 per cubic cm. Standard PDR models underpredict the intensity in the H2 rotational lines by up to an order of magnitude. This problem has also been seen in bright PDRs and attributed to factors, such as geometry and gas-grain drift, that should be much less important in the regime studied here. The fact that we see the same problem in our data suggests that more fundamental solutions, such as higher H2 formation rates, are needed. Also, in this regime of low density and small line width, the OI line is sensitive to the radiative transfer and geometry. Using the ionization structure of the models, a quantitative analysis of timescales for ambipolar diffusion in the peripheral regions of the S140 cloud is consistent with a theory of photoionization-regulated star formation. Observations of CII in other galaxies differ both from those of high Go PDRs in our galaxy and from the low Go regions we have studied. ~
  • Extremely high velocity (EHV) wings, with full widths of 72 to 140 km/s, are seen on the CO J=3-2 lines toward W3 IRS 5, GL 490, NGC 2071, W28 A2, GL 2591, S140, and Cepheus A. The results of our survey suggest that EHV wings are common around infrared sources of moderate to high luminosity (500 to 4x10^5 Lsun) in dense regions. Line ratios imply that the EHV gas is usually optically thin and warm. Characteristic velocities range from 20 to 40 km/s, yielding timescales of 1600-4200 yr. Since most sources in this study are producing some ionizing photons, these short timescales suggest that neutral winds coexist with ionizing photons. We examined two possible sources for the EHV CO emission: a neutral stellar wind; and swept-up or entrained molecular gas. Neither can be ruled out. If the high-velocity (HV) gas is swept up by a momentum-conserving stellar wind traced by the extremely high velocity CO emission, most of the C in the winds from luminous objects cannot be in CO. If the EHV and HV forces are equal, the fraction of C in a form other than CO increases with source luminosity and with the production rate of ionizing photons.