• Far-infrared astronomy has advanced rapidly since its inception in the late 1950's, driven by a maturing technology base and an expanding community of researchers. This advancement has shown that observations at far-infrared wavelengths are important in nearly all areas of astrophysics, from the search for habitable planets and the origin of life, to the earliest stages of galaxy assembly in the first few hundred million years of cosmic history. The combination of a still developing portfolio of technologies, particularly in the field of detectors, and a widening ensemble of platforms within which these technologies can be deployed, means that far-infrared astronomy holds the potential for paradigm-shifting advances over the next decade. In this review, we examine current and future far-infrared observing platforms, including ground-based, sub-orbital, and space-based facilities, and discuss the technology development pathways that will enable and enhance these platforms to best address the challenges facing far-infrared astronomy in the 21st century.
  • Shuo Kong, John M. Carpenter, Andrea Isella, Álvaro Sánchez-Monge, Thushara Pillai, Dariusz C. Lis, Steve Mairs, Peter Schilke, Chihomi Hara, Anika Schmiedeke, Kazushige Sasaki, Yoshihiro Tanabe Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, France, Department of Physics, Astronomy, Rice University, USA, I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Germany, California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy, Astrophysics 249-17, USA, Haystack Observatory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Germany, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany, Department of Physics, Astronomy, Stony Brook University, USA, Department of Astrophysical, Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, USA, Sorbonne Université, Observatoire de Paris, Université PSL, CNRS, LERMA, France, California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy, Astrophysics 301-17, USA, Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain, Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Germany, Universität Heidelberg, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Wissenschaftliches Rechnen, Germany, East Asian Observatory, USA, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, USA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, USA, Department of Earth, Space, Environment Sciences, College of the Canyons, USA, Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, USA, Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, Japan, Institute for Theory, Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, USA, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics, Astronomy, University of Manchester, UK, Japan Womens University, Japan, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Japan)
    March 30, 2018 astro-ph.GA
    We present the first results from a new, high resolution, $^{12}$CO(1-0), $^{13}$CO(1-0), and C$^{18}$O(1-0) molecular line survey of the Orion A cloud, hereafter referred to as the CARMA-NRO Orion Survey. CARMA observations have been combined with single-dish data from the Nobeyama 45m telescope to provide extended images at about 0.01 pc resolution, with a dynamic range of approximately 1200 in spatial scale. Here we describe the practical details of the data combination in uv space, including flux scale matching, the conversion of single dish data to visibilities, and joint deconvolution of single dish and interferometric data. A $\Delta$-variance analysis indicates that no artifacts are caused by combining data from the two instruments. Initial analysis of the data cubes, including moment maps, average spectra, channel maps, position-velocity diagrams, excitation temperature, column density, and line ratio maps provides evidence of complex and interesting structures such as filaments, bipolar outflows, shells, bubbles, and photo-eroded pillars. The implications for star formation processes are profound and follow-up scientific studies by the CARMA-NRO Orion team are now underway. We plan to make all the data products described here generally accessible; some are already available at https://dataverse.harvard.edu/dataverse/CARMA-NRO-Orion
  • We performed very deep searches for 2 ground-state water transitions in 13 protoplanetary disks with the HIFI instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory, with integration times up to 12 hours per line. Two other water transitions that sample warmer gas were also searched for with shallower integrations. The detection rate is low, and the upper limits provided by the observations are generally much lower than predictions of thermo-chemical models with canonical inputs. One ground-state transition is newly detected in the stacked spectrum of AA Tau, DM Tau, LkCa 15, and MWC 480. We run a grid of models to show that the abundance of gas-phase oxygen needs to be reduced by a factor of at least ~100 to be consistent with the observational upper limits (and positive detections) if a dust-to-gas mass ratio of 0.01 were to be assumed. As a continuation of previous ideas, we propose that the underlying reason for the depletion of oxygen (hence the low detection rate) is the freeze-out of volatiles such as water and CO onto dust grains followed by grain growth and settling/migration, which permanently removes these gas-phase molecules from the emissive upper layers of the outer disk. Such depletion of volatiles is likely ubiquitous among different disks, though not necessarily to the same degree. The volatiles might be returned back to the gas phase in the inner disk (within about 15 AU), which is consistent with current constraints. Comparison with studies on disk dispersal due to photoevaporation indicates that the timescale for volatile depletion is shorter than that of photoevaporation.
  • The CH$^+$ ion is a key species in the initial steps of interstellar carbon chemistry. Its formation in diverse environments where it is observed is not well understood, however, because the main production pathway is so endothermic (4280 K) that it is unlikely to proceed at the typical temperatures of molecular clouds. We investigation CH$^+$ formation with the first velocity-resolved spectral mapping of the CH$^+$ $J=1-0, 2-1$ rotational transitions, three sets of CH $\Lambda$-doubled triplet lines, $^{12}$C$^+$ and $^{13}$C$^+$, and CH$_3$OH 835~GHz E-symmetry Q branch transitions, obtained with Herschel/HIFI over $\approx$12 arcmin$^2$ centered on the Orion BN/KL source. We present the spatial morphologies and kinematics, cloud boundary conditions, excitation temperatures, column densities, and $^{12}$C$^+$ optical depths. Emission from C$^+$, CH$^+$, and CH is indicated to arise in the diluted gas, outside of the explosive, dense BN/KL outflow. Our models show that UV-irradiation provides favorable conditions for steady-state production of CH$^+$ in this environment. Surprisingly, no spatial or kinematic correspondences of these species are found with H$_2$ S(1) emission tracing shocked gas in the outflow. We propose that C$^+$ is being consumed by rapid production of CO to explain the lack of C$^+$ and CH$^+$ in the outflow, and that fluorescence provides the reservoir of H$_2$ excited to higher ro-vibrational and rotational levels. Hence, in star-forming environments containing sources of shocks and strong UV radiation, a description of CH$^+$ formation and excitation conditions is incomplete without including the important --- possibly dominant --- role of UV irradiation.
  • Nitrogen chemistry in protoplanetary disks and the freeze-out on dust particles is key to understand the formation of nitrogen bearing species in early solar system analogs. So far, ammonia has not been detected beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. We aim to find gas-phase ammonia in a protoplanetary disk and characterize its abundance with respect to water vapor. Using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory we detect, for the first time, the ground-state rotational emission of ortho-NH$_3$ in a protoplanetary disk, around TW Hya. We use detailed models of the disk's physical structure and the chemistry of ammonia and water to infer the amounts of gas-phase molecules of these species. We explore two radial distributions ( confined to $<$60 au like the millimeter-sized grains) and two vertical distributions (near the midplane where water is expected to photodesorb off icy grains) to describe the (unknown) location of the molecules. These distributions capture the effects of radial drift and vertical settling of ice-covered grains. We use physical-chemical models to reproduce the fluxes with assuming that water and ammonia are co-spatial. We infer ammonia gas-phase masses of 0.7-11.0 $\times$10$^{21}$ g. For water, we infer gas-phase masses of 0.2-16.0 $\times$10$^{22}$ g. This corresponds to NH$_3$/H$_2$O abundance ratios of 7\%-84\%, assuming that water and ammonia are co-located. Only in the most compact and settled adopted configuration is the inferred NH$_3$/H$_2$O consistent with interstellar ices and solar system bodies of $\sim$ 5\%-10\%. Volatile release in the midplane may occur via collisions between icy bodies if the available surface for subsequent freeze-out is significantly reduced, e.g., through growth of small grains into pebbles or larger.
  • The presence of numerous complex organic molecules (COMs; defined as those containing six or more atoms) around protostars shows that star formation is accompanied by an increase of molecular complexity. These COMs may be part of the material from which planetesimals and, ultimately, planets formed. Comets represent some of the oldest and most primitive material in the solar system, including ices, and are thus our best window into the volatile composition of the solar protoplanetary disk. Molecules identified to be present in cometary ices include water, simple hydrocarbons, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen-bearing species, as well as a few COMs, such as ethylene glycol and glycine. We report the detection of 21 molecules in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), including the first identification of ethyl alcohol (ethanol, C2H5OH) and the simplest monosaccharide sugar glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) in a comet. The abundances of ethanol and glycolaldehyde, respectively 5 and 0.8% relative to methanol (0.12 and 0.02% relative to water), are somewhat higher than the values measured in solar- type protostars. Overall, the high abundance of COMs in cometary ices supports the formation through grain-surface reactions in the solar system protoplanetary disk.
  • Argonium has recently been detected as a ubiquitous molecule in our Galaxy. Model calculations indicate that its abundance peaks at molecular fractions in the range of 1E-4 to 1E-3 and that the observed column densities require high values of the cosmic ray ionization rate. Therefore, this molecular cation may serve as an excellent tracer of the very diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), as well as an indicator of the cosmic ray ionization rate. We attempted to detect ArH+ in extragalactic sources to evaluate its diagnostic power as a tracer of the almost purely atomic ISM in distant galaxies. We obtained ALMA observations of a foreground galaxy at z = 0.89 in the direction of the lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. Two isotopologs of argonium, 36ArH+ and 38ArH+, were detected in absorption along two different lines of sight toward PKS 1830-211, known as the SW and NE images of the background blazar. The argonium absorption is clearly enhanced on the more diffuse line of sight (NE) compared to other molecular species. The isotopic ratio 36Ar/38Ar is 3.46 +- 0.16 toward the SW image, i.e., significantly lower than the solar value of 5.5. Our results demonstrate the suitability of argonium as a tracer of the almost purely atomic, diffuse ISM in high-redshift sources. The evolution of the isotopic ratio with redshift may help to constrain nucleosynthetic scenarios in the early Universe.
  • Understanding water deuterium fractionation is important for constraining the mechanisms of water formation in interstellar clouds. Observations of HDO and H$_2^{18}$O transitions were carried out towards the high-mass star-forming region G34.26+0.15 with the HIFI instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory, as well as with ground-based single-dish telescopes. Ten HDO lines and three H$_2^{18}$O lines covering a broad range of upper energy levels (22-204 K) were detected. We used a non-LTE 1D analysis to determine the HDO/H$_2$O ratio as a function of radius in the envelope. Models with different water abundance distributions were considered in order to reproduce the observed line profiles. The HDO/H$_2$O ratio is found to be lower in the hot core ($\sim$3.5 $\times$ 10$^{-4}$ - 7.5 $\times$ 10$^{-4}$) than in the colder envelope ($\sim$1.0 $\times$ 10$^{-3}$ - 2.2 $\times$ 10$^{-3}$). This is the first time that a radial variation of the HDO/H$_2$O ratio has been found to occur in a high-mass source. The chemical evolution of this source was modeled as a function of its radius and the observations are relatively well reproduced. The comparison between the chemical model and the observations leads to an age of $\sim$10$^5$ years after the infrared dark cloud stage.
  • We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C-shock through a clump with preshock density 2e4/cm3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O$_2$ can explain the emission from the source if its line of sight dimension is ~10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O$_2$ emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of a broad band spectral line survey of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL), one of the most chemically rich regions in the Galaxy, using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This survey spans a frequency range from 480 to 1907 GHz at a resolution of 1.1 MHz. These observations thus encompass the largest spectral coverage ever obtained toward this high-mass star-forming region in the sub-mm with high spectral resolution, and include frequencies $>$ 1 THz where the Earth's atmosphere prevents observations from the ground. In all, we detect emission from 39 molecules (79 isotopologues). Combining this dataset with ground based mm spectroscopy obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, we model the molecular emission from the mm to the far-IR using the XCLASS program which assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Several molecules are also modeled with the MADEX non-LTE code. Because of the wide frequency coverage, our models are constrained by transitions over an unprecedented range in excitation energy. A reduced $\chi^{2}$ analysis indicates that models for most species reproduce the observed emission well. In particular, most complex organics are well fit by LTE implying gas densities are high ($>$10$^6$ cm$^{-3}$) and excitation temperatures and column densities are well constrained. Molecular abundances are computed using H$_{2}$ column densities also derived from the HIFI survey. The distribution of rotation temperatures, $T_{\rm rot}$, for molecules detected toward the hot core is significantly wider than the compact ridge, plateau, and extended ridge $T_{\rm rot}$ distributions, indicating the hot core has the most complex thermal structure.
  • A sensitive broadband molecular line survey of the Sagittarius B2(N) star-forming region has been obtained with the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory, offering the first high-spectral resolution look at this well-studied source in a wavelength region largely inaccessible from the ground (625-157 um). From the roughly 8,000 spectral features in the survey, a total of 72 isotopologues arising from 44 different molecules have been identified, ranging from light hydrides to complex organics, and arising from a variety of environments from cold and diffuse to hot and dense gas. We present an LTE model to the spectral signatures of each molecule, constraining the source sizes for hot core species with complementary SMA interferometric observations, and assuming that molecules with related functional group composition are cospatial. For each molecule, a single model is given to fit all of the emission and absorption features of that species across the entire 480-1910 GHz spectral range, accounting for multiple temperature and velocity components when needed to describe the spectrum. As with other HIFI surveys toward massive star forming regions, methanol is found to contribute more integrated line intensity to the spectrum than any other species. We discuss the molecular abundances derived for the hot core, where the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation is generally found to describe the spectrum well, in comparison to abundances derived for the same molecules in the Orion KL region from a similar HIFI survey.
  • We describe the assignment of a previously unidentified interstellar absorption line to ArH$^+$ and discuss its relevance in the context of hydride absorption in diffuse gas with a low H$_2$ fraction. The column densities along several lines of sight are determined and discussd in the framework of chemical models. The column densities of ArH$^+$ are compared to those of other species, tracing interstellar medium (ISM) components with different H$_2$ abundances. Chemical models are constructed, taking UV radiation and cosmic ray ionization into account. Due to the detection of two isotopologues, $^{36}$ArH$^+$ and $^{38}$ArH$^+$, we are confident about the carrier assignment to ArH$^+$. NeH$^+$ is not detected with a limit of [NeH$^+$]/[ArH$^+$] $\le$ 0.1. The derived column densities agree well with the predictions of chemical models. ArH$^+$ is a unique tracer of gas with a fractional H$_2$ abundance of $10^{-4}- 10^{-3}$ and shows little correlation with H$_2$O$^+$, which traces gas with a fractional H$_2$ abundance of $\approx $0.1. A careful analysis of variations in the ArH$^+$, OH$^+$, H$_2$O$^+$ and HF column densities promises to be a faithful tracer of the distribution of the H$_2$ fractional abundance, providing unique information on a poorly known phase in the cycle of interstellar matter, its transition from atomic diffuse gas to dense molecular gas traced by CO emission. Abundances of these species put strong observational constraints upon magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of the interstellar medium, and potentially could evolve into a tool to characterize the ISM. Paradoxically, the ArH$^+$ molecule is a better tracer of \new{almost} purely atomic hydrogen gas than H{\sc i} itself, since H{\sc i} can also be present in gas with a significant molecular content, but ArH$^+$ singles out gas that is $>99.9$\% atomic.
  • Results from recent space missions, in particular Spitzer and Herschel, have lead to significant progress in our understanding of the formation and transport of water from clouds to disks, planetesimals, and planets. In this review, we provide the underpinnings for the basic molecular physics and chemistry of water and outline these advances in the context of water formation in space, its transport to a forming disk, its evolution in the disk, and finally the delivery to forming terrestrial worlds and accretion by gas giants. Throughout, we pay close attention to the disposition of water as vapor or solid and whether it might be subject to processing at any stage. The context of the water in the solar system and the isotopic ratios (D/H) in various bodies are discussed as grounding data point for this evolution. Additional advances include growing knowledge of the composition of atmospheres of extra-solar gas giants, which may be influenced by the variable phases of water in the protoplanetary disk. Further, the architecture of extra-solar systems leaves strong hints of dynamical interactions, which are important for the delivery of water and subsequent evolution of planetary systems. We conclude with an exploration of water on Earth and note that all of the processes and key parameters identified here should also hold for exoplanetary systems.
  • According to traditional gas-phase chemical models, O2 should be abundant in molecular clouds, but until recently, attempts to detect interstellar O2 line emission with ground- and space-based observatories have failed. Following the multi-line detections of O2 with low abundances in the Orion and rho Oph A molecular clouds with Herschel, it is important to investigate other environments, and we here quantify the O2 abundance near a solar-mass protostar. Observations of O2, at 487 GHz toward a deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 protostar, NGC 1333-IRAS 4A, are presented, using the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Complementary data of the chemically related NO and CO molecules are obtained as well. The high spectral resolution data are analysed using radiative transfer models to infer column densities and abundances, and are tested directly against full gas-grain chemical models. The deep HIFI spectrum fails to show O2 at the velocity of the dense protostellar envelope, implying one of the lowest abundance upper limits of O2/H2 at <6x10^-9 (3 sigma). However, a tentative (4.5 sigma) detection of O2 is seen at the velocity of the surrounding NGC 1333 molecular cloud, shifted by 1 km/s relative to the protostar. For the protostellar envelope, pure gas-phase models and gas-grain chemical models require a long pre-collapse phase (~0.7-1x10^6 years), during which atomic and molecular oxygen are frozen out onto dust grains and fully converted to H2O, to avoid overproduction of O2 in the dense envelope. The same model also reproduces the limits on the chemically related NO molecule. The tentative detection of O2 in the surrounding cloud is consistent with a low-density PDR model with small changes in reaction rates. The low O2 abundance in the collapsing envelope around a low-mass protostar suggests that the gas and ice entering protoplanetary disks is very poor in O2.
  • The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) aboard the Herschel Space Observatory has acquired high-resolution broadband molecular spectra of star-forming regions in a wavelength range that is mostly inaccessible from ground-based astronomical observatories. These spectral surveys provide new insight into the chemical composition and physical properties of molecular clouds. In this manuscript, we present initial results from the HIFI spectral survey of the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud, which contains spectral features assigned to at least 40 different molecules in a range of physical environments. While extensive line blending is observed due to the chemical complexity of this region, reliable molecular line identifications can be made, down to the noise floor, due to the large number of transitions detected for each species in the 1.2 THz survey bandwidth. This allows for the extraction of new weakly emitting species from the line forest. These HIFI surveys will be an invaluable archival resource for future investigations into interstellar chemistry.
  • Hydrogen fluoride has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J=1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H2 of 1.5e-8 in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC6334 I, we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5e-10. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freeze out of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant 3.6e-8) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freeze out onto gas grains.
  • We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O2) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the HII region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O2 N_J = 3_3 - 1_2 transition at 487 GHz and the 5_4 - 3_4 transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3sigma upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O2 column density < 1.5 10^16 cm^-2 for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30K and 250 K, or < 1 10^16 cm^-2 if the O2 emitting region is primarily at a temperature of ~< 100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O2 column density is less than 4 10^15 cm^-2, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 10^4 - 10^5 cm^-3 exposed to a far ultraviolet flux 10^4 times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if: (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K; (2) the total face-on Av of the Bar is less than required for O2 to reach peak abundance; (3) the O2 emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or, (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O2 reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams.
  • We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5\times1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19"), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is 0.3 - 7.3\times10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~ 5" diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~ 10 M\odot and the dust temperature is \geq 150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T \geq 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature \geq 180 K. The inferred O2 column density \simeq 5\times1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) \simeq 4\times1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10 to 15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2.
  • We report new observations of the fundamental $J=1-0$ transition of HCl (at 625.918GHz) toward a sample of 25 galactic star-forming regions, molecular clouds, and evolved stars, carried out using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Fourteen sources in the sample are also observed in the corresponding H\tscl\ $J=1-0$ transition (at 624.978GHz). We have obtained clear detections in all but four of the targets, often in emission. Absorptions against bright background continuum sources are also seen in nine cases, usually involving a delicate balance between emission and absorption features. From RADEX modeling, we derive gas densities and HCl column densities for sources with HCl emission. HCl is found in a wide range of environments, with gas densities ranging from $10^5$ to $10^7$~cm$^{-3}$. The HCl abundance relative to H$_2$ is in the range of $(3-30)\times10^{-10}$. Comparing with the chlorine abundance in the solar neighborhood, this corresponds to a chlorine depletion factor of up to $\sim$400, assuming that HCl accounts for one third of the total chlorine in the gas phase. The [\tfcl]/[\tscl] isotopic ratio is rather varied, from unity to $\sim$5, mostly lower than the terrestrial value of 3.1. Such variation is highly localized, and could be generated by the nucleosynthesis in supernovae, which predicts a \tscl\ deficiency in most models. The lower ratios seen in W3IRS4 and W3IRS5 likely confine the progenitors of the supernovae to stars with relatively large mass ($\ga$25M$_\sun$) and high metallicity (Z$\sim$0.02).
  • Context: The low mass protostar IRAS16293-2422 is a prototype Class 0 source with respect to the studies of the chemical structure during the initial phases of life of Solar type stars. Aims: In order to derive an accurate chemical structure, a precise determination of the source physical structure is required. The scope of the present work is the derivation of the structure of IRAS16293-2422. Methods: We have re-analyzed all available continuum data (single dish and interferometric, from millimeter to MIR) to derive accurate density and dust temperature profiles. Using ISO observations of water, we have also reconstructed the gas temperature profile. Results: Our analysis shows that the envelope surrounding IRAS16293-2422 is well described by the Shu "inside-out" collapsing envelope model or a single power-law density profile with index equal to 1.8. In contrast to some previous studies, our analysis does not show evidence of a large (>/- 800 AU in diameter) cavity. Conclusions: Although IRAS16293-2422 is a multiple system composed by two or three objects, our reconstruction will be useful to derive the chemical structure of the large cold envelope surrounding these objects and the warm component, treated here as a single source, from single-dish observations of molecular emission.
  • Research on interstellar ND3 is reviewed and updated from the discovery papers. Results from observations of a dozen sources at centimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are presented. The two data sets are consistent, but do not constrain the excitation conditions in the ND3-emitting gas. The column density ratios of NH3:NH2D, NH2D:ND2H and ND2H:ND3, observed in similar sized beams, are ~10, and present a challenge for both the gas-phase and the grain-surface chemistry scenarios of deuterium fractionation. The role of shocks and of CO depletion in deuterium chemistry is discussed.