• Far-infrared astronomy has advanced rapidly since its inception in the late 1950's, driven by a maturing technology base and an expanding community of researchers. This advancement has shown that observations at far-infrared wavelengths are important in nearly all areas of astrophysics, from the search for habitable planets and the origin of life, to the earliest stages of galaxy assembly in the first few hundred million years of cosmic history. The combination of a still developing portfolio of technologies, particularly in the field of detectors, and a widening ensemble of platforms within which these technologies can be deployed, means that far-infrared astronomy holds the potential for paradigm-shifting advances over the next decade. In this review, we examine current and future far-infrared observing platforms, including ground-based, sub-orbital, and space-based facilities, and discuss the technology development pathways that will enable and enhance these platforms to best address the challenges facing far-infrared astronomy in the 21st century.
  • We present the results of a Herschel survey of 21 late-type stars that host planets discovered by the radial velocity technique. The aims were to discover new disks in these systems and to search for any correlation between planet presence and disk properties. In addition to the known disk around GJ 581, we report the discovery of two new disks, in the GJ 433 and GJ 649 systems. Our sample therefore yields a disk detection rate of 14%, higher than the detection rate of 1.2% among our control sample of DEBRIS M-type stars with 98% confidence. Further analysis however shows that the disk sensitivity in the control sample is about a factor of two lower in fractional luminosity than for our survey, lowering the significance of any correlation between planet presence and disk brightness below 98%. In terms of their specific architectures, the disk around GJ 433 lies at a radius somewhere between 1 and 30au. The disk around GJ 649 lies somewhere between 6 and 30au, but is marginally resolved and appears more consistent with an edge-on inclination. In both cases the disks probably lie well beyond where the known planets reside (0.06-1.1au), but the lack of radial velocity sensitivity at larger separations allows for unseen Saturn-mass planets to orbit out to $\sim$5au, and more massive planets beyond 5au. The layout of these M-type systems appears similar to Sun-like star + disk systems with low-mass planets.
  • We present the science cases and technological discussions that came from the workshop entitled "Finding the UV-Visible Path Forward" held at NASA GSFC June 25-26, 2015. The material presented outlines the compelling science that can be enabled by a next generation space-based observatory dedicated for UV-visible science, the technologies that are available to include in that observatory design, and the range of possible alternative launch approaches that could also enable some of the science. The recommendations to the Cosmic Origins Program Analysis Group from the workshop attendees on possible future development directions are outlined.
  • At the distance of 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disk, probably in transition between a massive primordial disk and a debris disk. We observed the fine-structure lines of OI at 63 and 145 micron and the CII line at 157 micron with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Telescope as part of the open-time large programme GASPS. We complemented the atomic line observations with archival Spitzer spectroscopic and photometric continuum data, a ground-based VLT-VISIR image at 8.6 micron, and 12CO fundamental ro-vibrational and pure rotational J=3-2 observations. We simultaneously modeled the continuum emission and the line fluxes with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk gas- and dust properties assuming no dust settling. The models suggest that the oxygen lines are emitted from the inner disk around HD141569A, whereas the [CII] line emission is more extended. The CO submillimeter flux is emitted mostly by the outer disk. Simultaneous modeling of the photometric and line data using a realistic disk structure suggests a dust mass derived from grains with a radius smaller than 1 mm of 2.1E-7 MSun and from grains with a radius of up to 1 cm of 4.9E-6 MSun. We constrained the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mass to be between 2E-11 and 1..4E-10 MSun assuming circumcircumcoronene (C150H30) as the representative PAH. The associated PAH abundance relative to hydrogen is lower than those found in the interstellar medium (3E-7) by two to three orders of magnitude. The disk around HD141569A is less massive in gas (2.5 to 4.9E-4 MSun or 67 to 164 MEarth) and has a flat opening angle (<10%). [abridged]
  • We analyze the accretion properties of 21 low mass T Tauri stars using a dataset of contemporaneous near ultraviolet (NUV) through optical observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the ground based Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS), a unique dataset because of the nearly simultaneous broad wavelength coverage. Our dataset includes accreting T Tauri stars (CTTS) in Taurus, Chamaeleon I, $\eta$ Chamaeleon and the TW Hydra Association. For each source we calculate the accretion rate by fitting the NUV and optical excesses above the photosphere, produced in the accretion shock, introducing multiple accretion components characterized by a range in energy flux (or density) for the first time. This treatment is motivated by models of the magnetospheric geometry and accretion footprints, which predict that high density, low filling factor accretion spots co-exist with low density, high filling factor spots. By fitting the UV and optical spectra with multiple accretion components, we can explain excesses which have been observed in the near infrared. Comparing our estimates of the accretion rate to previous estimates, we find some discrepancies; however, they may be accounted for when considering assumptions for the amount of extinction and variability in optical spectra. Therefore, we confirm many previous estimates of the accretion rate. Finally, we measure emission line luminosities from the same spectra used for the accretion rate estimates, to produce correlations between accretion indicators (H$\beta$, Ca II K, C II] and Mg II) and accretion properties obtained simultaneously.
  • Young stars surrounded by disks with very low mass accretion rates are likely in the final stages of inner disk evolution and therefore particularly interesting to study. We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of the ~5-9 Myr old stars RECX-1 and RECX-11, obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), as well as optical and near infrared spectroscopic observations. The two stars have similar levels of near UV emission, although spectroscopic evidence indicates that RECX-11 is accreting and RECX-1 is not. The line profiles of Halpha and He I 10830 in RECX-11 show both broad and narrow redshifted absorption components that vary with time, revealing the complexity of the accretion flows. We show that accretion indicators commonly used to measure mass accretion rates, e.g. U band excess luminosity or the Ca II triplet line luminosity are unreliable for low accretors, at least in the middle K spectral range. Using RECX-1 as a template for the intrinsic level of photospheric and chromospheric emission, we determine an upper limit of 3 x 10^-10 solar masses/ year for RECX-11. At this low accretion rate, recent photoevaporation models predict that an inner hole should have developed in the disk. However, the spectral energy distribution of RECX-11 shows fluxes comparable to the median of Taurus in the near infrared, indicating that substantial dust remains. Fluorescent H_2 emission lines formed in the innermost disk are observed in RECX-11, showing that gas is present in the inner disk, along with the dust.
  • HST/NICMOS PSF-subtracted coronagraphic observations of HD 181327 have revealed the presence of a ring-like disk of circumstellar debris seen in 1.1 micron light scattered by the disk grains, surrounded by a di use outer region of lower surface brightness. The annular disk appears to be inclined by 31.7 +/- 1.6 deg from face on with the disk major axis PA at 107 +/-2 deg . The total 1.1 micron flux density of the light scattered by the disk (at 1.2" < r < 5.0") of 9.6 mJy +/- 0.8 mJy is 0.17% +/- 0.015% of the starlight. Seventy percent of the light from the scattering grains appears to be confined in a 36 AU wide annulus centered on the peak of the radial surface brightness (SB) profile 86.3 +/- 3.9 AU from the star, well beyond the characteristic radius of thermal emission estimated from IRAS and Spitzer flux densities assuming blackbody grains (~ 22 AU). The light scattered by the ring appears bilaterally symmetric, exhibits directionally preferential scattering well represented by a Henyey-Greenstein scattering phase function with g = 0.30 +/- 0.03, and has an azimuthally medianed SB at the 86.3 AU radius of peak SB of 1.00 +/- 0.07 mJy arcsec^-2. No photocentric offset is seen in the ring relative to the position of the central star. A low surface brightness diffuse halo is seen in the NICMOS image to a distance of ~ 4" Deeper 0.6 micron HST/ACS PSF-subtracted coronagraphic observations reveal a faint outer nebulosity, asymmetrically brighter to the North of the star. We discuss models of the disk and properties of its grains, from which we infer a maximum vertical scale height of 4 - 8 AU at the 87.6 AU radius of maximum surface density, and a total maximum dust mass of collisionally replenished grains with minimum grain sizes of ~ 1 micron of ~ 4 M(moon).
  • (abridged) We present an analysis of high resolution optical spectra for a sample of very young, mid- to late M, low-mass stellar and substellar objects in Upper Sco and Taurus. Effective temperatures (T_eff) and surface gravities are derived from a multi-feature spectral analysis using TiO, NaI and KI, through comparison with the latest synthetic spectra. In combination, they allow us to determine T_eff to within 50K and gravity to within 0.25 dex. Our high-resolution analysis does not require extinction estimates. Moroever, it yields T_eff and gravities independent of theoretical evolutionary models. We find that our gravities for most of the sample agree remarkably well with the isochrone predictions for the likely cluster ages. However, discrepancies appear in our coolest targets: these appear to have significantly lower gravity (by up to 0.75 dex) than our hotter objects, even though our entire sample covers a relatively narrow range in T_eff (about 300K). This drop in gravity is also implied by inter-comparisons of the data alone, without recourse to synthetic spectra. We consider, and argue against, dust opacity, cool stellar spots or metallicity differences leading to the observed spectral effects; a real decline in gravity is strongly indicated. Such gravity variations are contrary to the predictions of the evolutionary tracks, causing improbably low ages to be inferred from the tracks for our coolest targets. We venture that these results may arise from evolutionary model uncertainties related to accretion, deuterium-burning and/or convection effects. Finally, when combined with photometry and distances, our technique for deriving gravities and temperatures provides a way of obtaining masses and radii for substellar objects independent of evolutionary models, as presented in Paper II.