• Precision cosmology requires accurate galaxy redshifts, but next generation optical surveys will observe unprecedented numbers of resolved galaxies, placing strain on the amount of spectroscopic follow-up required. We show how useful information can be gained on the redshift distributions of optical galaxy samples from spatial cross-correlations with intensity maps of unresolved HI (21cm) spectral line emission. We construct a redshift distribution estimator, which we test using simulations. We utilise the S3-SAX catalogue which includes HI emission information for each galaxy, which we use to construct HI intensity maps. We also make use of simulated LSST and Euclid-like photometry enabling us to apply the HI clustering calibration to realistic simulated photometric redshifts. While taking into account important limitations to HI intensity mapping such as lost k-modes from foreground cleaning and poor angular resolution due to large receiver beams, we show that excellent constraints on redshift distributions can be provided for an optical photometric sample.
  • We investigate the effect of microlensing on the standardisation of strongly lensed Type Ia supernovae (GLSNe Ia). We present predictions for the amount of scatter induced by microlensing across a range of plausible strong lens macromodels. We find that lensed images in regions of low convergence, shear and stellar density are standardisable, where the microlensing scatter is comparable to the intrinsic dispersion of a typical SN Ia. These standardiable configurations correspond to the outer image of an asymmetric double for lenses with large Einstein radii. Quadruple image systems, symmetric doubles and small Einstein radii lenses are not standardisable. We apply our model to the recently discovered GLSN Ia iPTF16geu and find that the large discrepancy between the observed flux and the macromodel predictions from More et al. 2016 cannot be explained by microlensing alone. Using the mock GLSNe Ia catalogue of Goldstein et al. 2017, we predict that ~22% of GLSNe Ia discovered by LSST will be standardisable, with a median Einstein radius of 0.9 arcseconds and a median time-delay of 41 days. By breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy the full LSST GLSNe Ia sample will be able to detect systematics in H0 at the 0.5% level.
  • We discuss the ground-breaking science that will be possible with a wide area survey, using the MeerKAT telescope, known as MeerKLASS (MeerKAT Large Area Synoptic Survey). The current specifications of MeerKAT make it a great fit for science applications that require large survey speeds but not necessarily high angular resolutions. In particular, for cosmology, a large survey over $\sim 4,000 \, {\rm deg}^2$ for $\sim 4,000$ hours will potentially provide the first ever measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillations using the 21cm intensity mapping technique, with enough accuracy to impose constraints on the nature of dark energy. The combination with multi-wavelength data will give unique additional information, such as exquisite constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity using the multi-tracer technique, as well as a better handle on foregrounds and systematics. Such a wide survey with MeerKAT is also a great match for HI galaxy studies, providing unrivalled statistics in the pre-SKA era for galaxies resolved in the HI emission line beyond local structures at z > 0.01. It will also produce a large continuum galaxy sample down to a depth of about 5\,$\mu$Jy in L-band, which is quite unique over such large areas and will allow studies of the large-scale structure of the Universe out to high redshifts, complementing the galaxy HI survey to form a transformational multi-wavelength approach to study galaxy dynamics and evolution. Finally, the same survey will supply unique information for a range of other science applications, including a large statistical investigation of galaxy clusters as well as produce a rotation measure map across a huge swathe of the sky. The MeerKLASS survey will be a crucial step on the road to using SKA1-MID for cosmological applications and other commensal surveys, as described in the top priority SKA key science projects (abridged).
  • Objects falling into an overdensity appear larger on its near side and smaller on its far side than other objects at the same redshift. This produces a dipolar pattern of magnification, primarily as a consequence of the Doppler effect. At low redshift this Doppler magnification completely dominates the usual integrated gravitational lensing contribution to the lensing magnification. We show that one can optimally observe this pattern by extracting the dipole in the cross-correlation of number counts and galaxy sizes. This dipole allows us to almost completely remove the contribution from gravitational lensing up to redshift 0.5, and even at high redshift z~1 the dipole picks up the Doppler magnification predominantly. Doppler magnification should be easily detectable in current and upcoming optical and radio surveys; by forecasting for telescopes such as the SKA, we show that this technique is competitive with using peculiar velocities via redshift-space distortions to constrain dark energy. It produces similar yet complementary constraints on the cosmological model to those found using measurements of the cosmic shear.
  • We forecast constraints on neutral hydrogen (HI) and cosmological parameters using near-term intensity mapping surveys with instruments such as BINGO, MeerKAT, and the SKA, and Stage III and IV optical galaxy surveys. If foregrounds and systematic effects can be controlled - a problem which becomes much easier in cross-correlation - these surveys will provide exquisite measurements of the HI density and bias, as well as measurements of the growth of structure, the angular diameter distance, and the Hubble rate, over a wide range of redshift. We also investigate the possibility of detecting the late time ISW effect using the Planck satellite and forthcoming intensity mapping surveys, finding that a large sky survey with Phase 1 of the SKA can achieve a near optimal detection.
  • We report on SPT-CLJ2011-5228, a giant system of arcs created by a cluster at $z=1.06$. The arc system is notable for the presence of a bright central image. The source is a Lyman Break galaxy at $z_s=2.39$ and the mass enclosed within the 14 arc second radius Einstein ring is $10^{14.2}$ solar masses. We perform a full light profile reconstruction of the lensed images to precisely infer the parameters of the mass distribution. The brightness of the central image demands that the central total density profile of the lens be shallow. By fitting the dark matter as a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile---with a free parameter for the inner density slope---we find that the break radius is $270^{+48}_{-76}$ kpc, and that the inner density falls with radius to the power $-0.38\pm0.04$ at 68 percent confidence. Such a shallow profile is in strong tension with our understanding of relaxed cold dark matter halos; dark matter only simulations predict the inner density should fall as $r^{-1}$. The tension can be alleviated if this cluster is in fact a merger; a two halo model can also reconstruct the data, with both clumps (density going as $r^{-0.8}$ and $r^{-1.0}$) much more consistent with predictions from dark matter only simulations. At the resolution of our Dark Energy Survey imaging, we are unable to choose between these two models, but we make predictions for forthcoming Hubble Space Telescope imaging that will decisively distinguish between them.
  • Probing the relative speeds of gravitational waves and light acts as an important test of General Relativity and alternative theories of gravity. Measuring the arrival time of gravitational waves and electromagnetic counterparts can be used to measure the relative speeds, but only if the intrinsic time-lag between emission of the photons and gravitational waves is well understood. Here we suggest a method that does not make such an assumption, using future strongly lensed GW events and EM counterparts; Biesiada et al forecast that 50-100 strongly lensed GW events will be observed each year with the Einstein Telescope. A single strongly lensed GW event would produce robust constraints on the ratio of speeds of GWs and light at the $10^{-7}$ level, if a high energy EM counterpart is observed within the field-of-view of an observing gamma ray burst monitor.
  • We consider the dispersion on the supernova distance-redshift relation due to peculiar velocities and gravitational lensing, and the sensitivity of these effects to the amplitude of the matter power spectrum. We use the MeMo lensing likelihood developed by Quartin, Marra & Amendola (2014), which accounts for the characteristic non-Gaussian distribution caused by lensing magnification with measurements of the first four central moments of the distribution of magnitudes. We build on the MeMo likelihood by including the effects of peculiar velocities directly into the model for the moments. In order to measure the moments from sparse numbers of supernovae, we take a new approach using Kernel Density Estimation to estimate the underlying probability density function of the magnitude residuals. We also describe a bootstrap re-sampling approach to estimate the data covariance matrix. We then apply the method to the Joint Light-curve Analysis (JLA) supernova catalogue. When we impose only that the intrinsic dispersion in magnitudes is independent of redshift, we find $\sigma_8=0.44^{+0.63}_{-0.44}$ at the one standard deviation level, although we note that in tests on simulations, this model tends to overestimate the magnitude of the intrinsic dispersion, and underestimate $\sigma_8$. We note that the degeneracy between intrinsic dispersion and the effects of $\sigma_8$ is more pronounced when lensing and velocity effects are considered simultaneously, due to a cancellation of redshift dependence when both effects are included. Keeping the model of the intrinsic dispersion fixed as a Gaussian distribution of width 0.14 mag, we find $\sigma_8 = 1.07^{+0.50}_{-0.76}$.
  • The Beyond Horndeski class of alternative gravity theories allow for Self-accelerating de-Sitter cosmologies with no need for a cosmological constant. This makes them viable alternatives to $\Lambda$CDM and so testing their small-scale predictions against General Relativity is of paramount importance. These theories generically predict deviations in both the Newtonian force law and the gravitational lensing of light inside extended objects. Therefore, by simultaneously fitting the X-ray and lensing profiles of galaxy clusters new constraints can be obtained. In this work, we apply this methodology to the stacked profiles of 58 high-redshift ($ 0.1<z<1.2$) clusters using X-ray surface brightness profiles from the XMM Cluster Survey and weak lensing profiles from CFHTLenS. By performing a multi-parameter Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis, we are able to place new constraints on the parameters governing deviations from Newton's law $\Upsilon_{1}=-0.11^{+0.93}_{-0.67}$ and light bending $\Upsilon_{2}=-0.22^{+1.22}_{-1.19}$. Both constraints are consistent with General Relativity, for which $\Upsilon_{1}=\Upsilon_{2}=0$. We present here the first observational constraints on $\Upsilon_{2}$, as well as the first extragalactic measurement of both parameters.
  • We use two new hydrodynamical simulations of $\Lambda$CDM and $f(R)$ gravity to test the methodology used by Wilcox et al. 2015 (W15) in constraining the effects of a fifth force on the profiles of clusters of galaxies. We construct realistic simulated stacked weak lensing and X-ray surface brightness cluster profiles from these cosmological simulations, and then use these data projected along various lines-of-sight to test the spherical symmetry of our stacking procedure. We also test the applicability of the NFW profile to model weak lensing profiles of clusters in $f(R)$ gravity. Finally, we test the validity of the analytical model developed in W15 against the simulated profiles. Overall, we find our methodology is robust and broadly agrees with these simulated data. We also apply our full Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis from W15 to our simulated X-ray and lensing profiles, providing consistent constraints on the modified gravity parameters as obtained from the real cluster data, e.g. for our $\Lambda$CDM simulation we obtain $|f_{\rm{R}0}| < 8.3 \times 10^{-5}$ (95% CL), which is in good agreement with the W15 measurement of $|f_{\rm{R}0}| < 6 \times 10^{-5}$. Overall, these tests confirm the power of our methodology which can now be applied to larger cluster samples available with the next generation surveys.
  • We assess and develop techniques to remove contaminants when calculating the 3D galaxy power spectrum. We separate the process into three separate stages: (i) removing the contaminant signal, (ii) estimating the uncontaminated cosmological power spectrum, (iii) debiasing the resulting estimates. For (i), we show that removing the best-fit contaminant mode subtraction), and setting the contaminated components of the covariance to be infinite (mode deprojection) are mathematically equivalent. For (ii), performing a Quadratic Maximum Likelihood (QML) estimate after mode deprojection gives an optimal unbiased solution, although it requires the manipulation of large $N_{\rm mode}^2$ matrices ($N_{\rm mode}$ being the total number of modes)}, which is unfeasible for recent 3D galaxy surveys. Measuring a binned average of the modes for (ii) as proposed by \citet*[FKP]{Feldman} is faster and simpler, but is sub-optimal and gives rise to a biased solution. We present a method to debias the resulting FKP measurements that does not require any large matrix calculations. We argue that the sub-optimality of the FKP estimator compared with the QML estimator, caused by contaminants is less severe than that commonly ignored due to the survey window.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect HI clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the HI density $\Omega_{\rm HI}$, the HI bias $b_{\rm HI}$ and the galaxy-HI correlation coefficient $r_{\rm HI-g}$.
  • We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) as standardisable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z~3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the "Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae" (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardisation values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalise over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ~100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Omega_m by at least 20% (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia and 10,000 LSST-like SLSNe can measure Omega_m and w to 2% and 4% respectively. The real power of SLSNe becomes evident when we consider possible temporal variations in w(a), giving possible uncertainties of only 2%, 5% and 14% on Omega_m, w_0 and w_a respectively, from the combination of DES SNe Ia, LSST-like SLSNe and Planck. These errors are competitive with predicted Euclid constraints, indicating a future role for SLSNe for probing the high redshift Universe.
  • The cross-correlation of a foreground density field with two different background convergence fields can be used to measure cosmographic distance ratios and constrain dark energy parameters. We investigate the possibility of performing such measurements using a combination of optical galaxy surveys and HI intensity mapping surveys, with emphasis on the performance of the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Using HI intensity mapping to probe the foreground density tracer field and/or the background source fields has the advantage of excellent redshift resolution and a longer lever arm achieved by using the lensing signal from high redshift background sources. Our results show that, for our best SKA-optical configuration of surveys, a constant equation of state for dark energy can be constrained to $\simeq 8\%$ for a sky coverage $f_{\rm sky}=0.5$ and assuming a $\sigma(\Omega_{\rm DE})=0.03$ prior for the dark energy density parameter. We also show that using the CMB as the second source plane is not competitive, even when considering a COrE-like satellite.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • The chameleon gravity model postulates the existence of a scalar field that couples with matter to mediate a fifth force. If it exists, this fifth force would influence the hot X-ray emitting gas filling the potential wells of galaxy clusters. However, it would not influence the clusters' weak lensing signal. Therefore, by comparing X-ray and weak lensing profiles, one can place upper limits on the strength of a fifth force. This technique has been attempted before using a single, nearby cluster (Coma, $z=0.02$). Here we apply the technique to the stacked profiles of 58 clusters at higher redshifts ($0.1<z<1.2$), including 12 new to the literature, using X-ray data from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) and weak lensing data from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). Using a multi-parameter MCMC analysis, we constrain the two chameleon gravity parameters ($\beta$ and $\phi_{\infty}$). Our fits are consistent with general relativity, not requiring a fifth force. In the special case of $f(R)$ gravity (where $\beta = \sqrt{1/6}$), we set an upper limit on the background field amplitude today of $|f_{\rm{R0}}| < 6 \times 10^{-5}$ (95% CL). This is one of the strongest constraints to date on $|f_{\rm{R0}}|$ on cosmological scales. We hope to improve this constraint in future by extending the study to hundreds of clusters using data from the Dark Energy Survey.
  • Employing a nonparametric approach of the principal component analysis (PCA), we forecast the future constraint on the equation of state $w(z)$ of dark energy, and on the effective Newton constant $\mu(k,z)$, which parameterise the effect of modified gravity, using the planned SKA HI galaxy survey. Combining with the simulated data of Planck and Dark Energy Survey (DES), we find that SKA Phase 1 (SKA1) and SKA Phase 2 (SKA2) can well constrain $3$ and $5$ eigenmodes of $w(z)$ respectively. The errors of the best measured modes can be reduced to 0.04 and 0.023 for SKA1 and SKA2 respectively, making it possible to probe dark energy dynamics. On the other hand, SKA1 and SKA2 can constrain $7$ and $20$ eigenmodes of $\mu(k,z)$ respectively within 10\% sensitivity level. Furthermore, 2 and 7 modes can be constrained within sub percent level using SKA1 and SKA2 respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to the combined datasets without SKA.
  • Weak gravitational lensing measurements are traditionally made at optical wavelengths where many highly resolved galaxy images are readily available. However, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) holds great promise for this type of measurement at radio wavelengths owing to its greatly increased sensitivity and resolution over typical radio surveys. The key to successful weak lensing experiments is in measuring the shapes of detected sources to high accuracy. In this document we describe a simulation pipeline designed to simulate radio images of the quality required for weak lensing, and will be typical of SKA observations. We provide as input, images with realistic galaxy shapes which are then simulated to produce images as they would have been observed with a given radio interferometer. We exploit this pipeline to investigate various stages of a weak lensing experiment in order to better understand the effects that may impact shape measurement. We first show how the proposed SKA1-Mid array configurations perform when we compare the (known) input and output ellipticities. We then investigate how making small changes to these array configurations impact on this input-outut ellipticity comparison. We also demonstrate how alternative configurations for SKA1-Mid that are smaller in extent, and with a faster survey speeds produce similar performance to those originally proposed. We then show how a notional SKA configuration performs in the same shape measurement challenge. Finally, we describe ongoing efforts to utilise our simulation pipeline to address questions relating to how applicable current (mostly originating from optical data) shape measurement techniques are to future radio surveys. As an alternative to such image plane techniques, we lastly discuss a shape measurement technique based on the shapelets formalism that reconstructs the source shapes directly from the visibility data.
  • We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.
  • Over the past few years two of the largest and highest fidelity experiments conceived have been approved for construction: Euclid is an ESA M-Class mission that will map three-quarters of the extra galactic sky with Hubble Space Telescope resolution optical and NIR imaging, and NIR spectroscopy, its scientific aims (amongst others) are to create a map of the dark Universe and to determine the nature of dark energy. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) has similar scientific aims (and others) using radio wavelength observations. The two experiments are synergistic in several respects, both through the scientific objectives and through the control of systematic effects. SKA Phase-1 and Euclid will be commissioned on similar timescales offering an exciting opportunity to exploit synergies between these facilities.
  • Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.
  • The peculiar motion of galaxies can be a particularly sensitive probe of gravitational collapse. As such, it can be used to measure the dynamics of dark matter and dark energy as well the nature of the gravitational laws at play on cosmological scales. Peculiar motions manifest themselves as an overall anisotropy in the measured clustering signal as a function of the angle to the line-of-sight, known as redshift-space distortion (RSD). Limiting factors in this measurement include our ability to model non-linear galaxy motions on small scales and the complexities of galaxy bias. The anisotropy in the measured clustering pattern in redshift-space is also driven by the unknown distance factors at the redshift in question, the Alcock-Paczynski distortion. This weakens growth rate measurements, but permits an extra geometric probe of the Hubble expansion rate. In this chapter we will briefly describe the scientific background to the RSD technique, and forecast the potential of the SKA phase 1 and the SKA2 to measure the growth rate using both galaxy catalogues and intensity mapping, assessing their competitiveness with current and future optical galaxy surveys.
  • Dark matter and dark energy are usually assumed to couple only gravitationally. An extension to this picture is to model dark energy as a scalar field coupled directly to cold dark matter. This coupling leads to new physical effects, such as a fifth-force and a time-dependent dark matter particle mass. In this work we examine the impact that coupling has on weak lensing statistics by constructing realistic simulated weak-lensing maps using raytracing techniques through N-body cosmological simulations. We construct maps for different lensing quantities, covering a range of scales from a few arcminutes to several degrees. The concordance $\Lambda$CDM model is compared to different coupled dark energy models, described either by an exponential scalar field potential (standard coupled dark energy scenario) or by a SUGRA potential (bouncing model). We analyse several statistical quantities and our results, with sources at low redshifts are largely consistent with previous work on CMB lensing by Carbone et al., 2013. The most significant differences from the $\Lambda$CDM model are due to the enhanced growth of the perturbations and to the effective friction term in non-linear dynamics. For the most extreme models, we see differences in the power spectra up to 40% compared to the $\Lambda$CDM model. The different time evolution of the linear matter overdensity can account for most of the differences, but when controlling for this using a $\Lambda$CDM model having the same normalization, the overall signal is smaller due to the effect of the friction term appearing in the equation of motion for dark matter particles.
  • We present a maximum probability approach to reconstructing spatial maps of the peculiar velocity field at redshifts $z\sim0.1$, where the velocities have been measured from distance indicators (DI) such as $D_n-\sigma$ relations or Tully-Fisher. With the large statistical uncertainties associated with DIs, our reconstruction method aims to recover the underlying true peculiar velocity field by reducing these errors with the use of two physically motivated filtering prior terms. The first constructs an estimate of the velocity field derived from the galaxy over-density {\deltag} and the second makes use of the matter linear density power spectrum {\pk}. Using $N$-body simulations we find, with an SDSS-like sample ($N_{gal}\simeq33$ per deg$^2$), an average correlation coefficient value of $r=0.55\pm{0.02}$ between our reconstructed velocity field and that of the true velocity field from the simulation. However, with a suitably high number density of galaxies from the next generation surveys (e.g. $N_{gal}\simeq140$ per deg$^2$) we can achieve an average $r=0.70\pm{0.02}$ out to moderate redshifts $z\sim0.1$. This will prove useful for future tests of gravity, as these relatively deep maps are complementary to weak lensing maps at the same redshift.