• Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • We present an overview of the design of IRIS, an infrared (0.85 - 2.5 micron) integral field spectrograph and imaging camera for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). With extremely low wavefront error (<30 nm) and on-board wavefront sensors, IRIS will take advantage of the high angular resolution of the narrow field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS) to dissect the sky at the diffraction limit of the 30-meter aperture. With a primary spectral resolution of 4000 and spatial sampling starting at 4 milliarcseconds, the instrument will create an unparalleled ability to explore high redshift galaxies, the Galactic center, star forming regions and virtually any astrophysical object. This paper summarizes the entire design and basic capabilities. Among the design innovations is the combination of lenslet and slicer integral field units, new 4Kx4k detectors, extremely precise atmospheric dispersion correction, infrared wavefront sensors, and a very large vacuum cryogenic system.
  • We present sensitivity estimates for point and resolved astronomical sources for the current design of the InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) on the future Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS, with TMT's adaptive optics system, will achieve unprecedented point source sensitivities in the near-infrared (0.84 - 2.45 {\mu}m) when compared to systems on current 8-10m ground based telescopes. The IRIS imager, in 5 hours of total integration, will be able to perform a few percent photometry on 26 - 29 magnitude (AB) point sources in the near-infrared broadband filters (Z, Y, J, H, K). The integral field spectrograph, with a range of scales and filters, will achieve good signal-to-noise on 22 - 26 magnitude (AB) point sources with a spectral resolution of R=4,000 in 5 hours of total integration time. We also present simulated 3D IRIS data of resolved high-redshift star forming galaxies (1 < z < 5), illustrating the extraordinary potential of this instrument to probe the dynamics, assembly, and chemical abundances of galaxies in the early universe. With its finest spatial scales, IRIS will be able to study luminous, massive, high-redshift star forming galaxies (star formation rates ~ 10 - 100 M yr-1) at ~100 pc resolution. Utilizing the coarsest spatial scales, IRIS will be able to observe fainter, less massive high-redshift galaxies, with integrated star formation rates less than 1 M yr-1, yielding a factor of 3 to 10 gain in sensitivity compared to current integral field spectrographs. The combination of both fine and coarse spatial scales with the diffraction-limit of the TMT will significantly advance our understanding of early galaxy formation processes and their subsequent evolution into presentday galaxies.
  • The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is a first-light instrument being designed for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is a combination of an imager that will cover a 16.4" field of view at the diffraction limit of TMT (4 mas sampling), and an integral field unit spectrograph that will sample objects at 4-50 mas scales. IRIS will open up new areas of observational parameter space, allowing major progress in diverse fields of astronomy. We present the science case and resulting requirements for the performance of IRIS. Ultimately, the spectrograph will enable very well-resolved and sensitive studies of the kinematics and internal chemical abundances of high-redshift galaxies, shedding light on many scenarios for the evolution of galaxies at early times. With unprecedented imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets, IRIS will allow detailed exploration of a range of planetary systems that are inaccessible with current technology. By revealing details about resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies, it will directly probe the formation of systems like our own Milky Way. Because it will be possible to directly characterize the stellar initial mass function in many environments and in galaxies outside of the the Milky Way, IRIS will enable a greater understanding of whether stars form differently in diverse conditions. IRIS will reveal detailed kinematics in the centers of low-mass galaxies, allowing a test of black hole formation scenarios. Finally, it will revolutionize the characterization of reionization and the first galaxies to form in the universe.
  • The Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is one of the three first light instruments for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and is the only one to directly sample the diffraction limit. The instrument consists of a parallel imager and off-axis Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) for optimum use of the near infrared (0.84um-2.4um) Adaptive Optics corrected focal surface. We present an overview of the IRIS spectrograph that is designed to probe a range of scientific targets from the dynamics and morphology of high-z galaxies to studying the atmospheres and surfaces of solar system objects, the latter requiring a narrow field and high Strehl performance. The IRIS spectrograph is a hybrid system consisting of two state of the art IFS technologies providing four plate scales (4mas, 9mas, 25mas, 50mas spaxel sizes). We present the design of the unique hybrid system that combines the power of a lenslet spectrograph and image slicer spectrograph in a configuration where major hardware is shared. The result is a powerful yet economical solution to what would otherwise require two separate 30m-class instruments.
  • The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is a first light client science instrument for the TMT observatory that operates as a client of the NFIRAOS facility multi-conjugate adaptive optics system. This paper reports on the concept study and baseline concept design of the On-Instrument WaveFront Sensors (OIWFS) and NFIRAOS interface subsystems of the IRIS science instrument, a collaborative effort by NRC-HIA, Caltech, and TMT AO and Instrument teams. This includes work on system engineering, structural and thermal design, sky coverage modeling, patrol geometry, probe optics and mechanics design, camera design, and controls design.
  • We present discovery observations of a quasar in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) at redshift z=6.44. We also use near-IR spectroscopy of nine CFHQS quasars at z~6 to determine black hole masses. These are compared with similar estimates for more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars to investigate the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity. We find a strong correlation between MgII FWHM and UV luminosity and that most quasars at this early epoch are accreting close to the Eddington limit. Thus these quasars appear to be in an early stage of their life cycle where they are building up their black hole mass exponentially. Combining these results with the quasar luminosity function, we derive the black hole mass function at z=6. Our black hole mass function is ~10^4 times lower than at z=0 and substantially below estimates from previous studies. The main uncertainties which could increase the black hole mass function are a larger population of obscured quasars at high-redshift than is observed at low-redshift and/or a low quasar duty cycle at z=6. In comparison, the global stellar mass function is only ~10^2 times lower at z=6 than at z=0. The difference between the black hole and stellar mass function evolution is due to either rapid early star formation which is not limited by radiation pressure as is the case for black hole growth or inefficient black hole seeding. Our work predicts that the black hole mass - stellar mass relation for a volume-limited sample of galaxies declines rapidly at very high redshift. This is in contrast to the observed increase at 4<z<6 from the local relation if one just studies the most massive black holes.
  • We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z ~ 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous SDSS sample we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalisation and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M_1450 approx -25. A double power law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1 sigma uncertainty < 0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M_1450 < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are Phi(M_1450^*) = 1.14 x 10^-8 Mpc^-3 mag^-1, break magnitude M_1450^* = -25.13 and bright end slope beta = -2.81. However the covariance between beta and M_1450^* prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M_1450^* < -24 we find -3.8 < beta < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.
  • We investigate the correlation between the mass of a central supermassive black hole and the total gravitational mass of the host galaxy (M_tot). The results are based on 43 galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses from the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey whose black hole masses were estimated through two scaling relations: the relation between black hole mass and Sersic index (M_bh - n) and the relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion (M_bh - sigma). We use the enclosed mass within R_200, the radius within which the density profile of the early type galaxy exceeds the critical density of the Universe by a factor of 200, determined by gravitational lens models fitted to HST imaging data, as a tracer of the total gravitational mass. The best fit correlation, where M_bh is determined from M_bh - sigma relation, is log(M_bh) = (8.18 +/- 0.11) + (1.55 +/- 0.31) (log(M_tot) - 13.0) over 2 orders of magnitude in M_bh. From a variety of tests, we find that we cannot reliably infer a connection between M_bh and M_tot from the M_bh - n relation. The M_bh - M_tot relation provides some of the first, direct observational evidence to test the prediction that supermassive black hole properties are determined by the halo properties of the host galaxy.
  • The Flamingos-2 Tandem Tunable filter is a tunable, narrow-band filter, consisting of two Fabry-Perot etalons in series, capable of scanning to any wavelength from 0.95 to 1.35 microns with a spectral resolution of R~800. It is an accessory mode instrument for the near-IR Flamingos-2 imaging-spectrograph designed for the Gemini South 8m Observatory and will be fed through the upcoming Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics feed. The primary science goal of the F2T2 filter is to perform a ground-based search for the first star forming regions in the universe at redshifts of 7 < z < 11. The construction of the F2T2 filter is complete and it is currently in its calibration and commissioning phases. In this proceeding, we describe the calibration and performance of the instrument.
  • To meet the scientific goals of the Thirty Meter Telescope Project, full diffraction-limited performance is required from the outset and hence the entire observatory is being designed, as a system, to achieve this. The preliminary design phases of the telescope and the first light adaptive optic facility are now approaching completion so that much better predictions of the system performance are possible. The telescope design and instrumentation are summarized in this presentation, with a brief description of some of the scientific programs that are foreseen.
  • The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) is an optical survey designed to locate quasars during the epoch of reionization. In this paper we present the discovery of the first four CFHQS quasars at redshift greater than 6, including the most distant known quasar, CFHQS J2329-0301 at z=6.43. We describe the observational method used to identify the quasars and present optical, infrared, and millimeter photometry and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We investigate the dust properties of these quasars finding an unusual dust extinction curve for one quasar and a high far-infrared luminosity due to dust emission for another. The mean millimeter continuum flux for CFHQS quasars is substantially lower than that for SDSS quasars at the same redshift, likely due to a correlation with quasar UV luminosity. For two quasars with sufficiently high signal-to-noise optical spectra, we use the spectra to investigate the ionization state of hydrogen at z>5. For CFHQS J1509-1749 at z=6.12, we find significant evolution (beyond a simple extrapolation of lower redshift data) in the Gunn-Peterson optical depth at z>5.4. The line-of-sight to this quasar has one of the highest known optical depths at z~5.8. An analysis of the sizes of the highly-ionized near-zones in the spectra of two quasars at z=6.12 and z=6.43 suggest the IGM surrounding these quasars was substantially ionized before these quasars turned on. Together, these observations point towards an extended reionization process, but we caution that cosmic variance is still a major limitation in z>6 quasar observations.
  • The galaxy population at z~6 has been the subject of intense study in recent years, culminating in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) -- the deepest imaging survey yet. A large number of high redshift galaxy candidates have been identified within the HUDF, but until now analysis of their properties has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for these faint galaxies. Our ''Gemini Lyman-Alpha at Reionisation Era'' (GLARE) project has been designed to undertake spectroscopic follow up of faint (z'<28.5) i'-drop galaxies at z~6 in the HUDF. In a previous paper we presented preliminary results from the first 7.5 hours of data from GLARE. In this paper we detail the complete survey. We have now obtained 36 hours of spectroscopy on a single GMOS slitmask from Gemini-South, with a spectral resolution of lambda/Delta(lambda) ~ 1000. We identify five strong Lyman-alpha emitters at z>5.5, and a further nine possible line emitters with detections at lower significance. We also place tight constraints on the equivalent width of Lyman-alpha emission for a further ten i'-drop galaxies and examine the equivalent width distribution of this faint spectroscopic sample of z~6 galaxies. We find that the fraction of galaxies with little or no emission is similar to that at z~3, but that the z~6 population has a tail of sources with high rest frame equivalent widths. Possible explanations for this effect include a tendency towards stronger line emission in faint sources, which may arise from extreme youth or low metallicity in the Lyman-break population at high redshift, or possibly a top-heavy initial mass function.
  • We have performed a deep spectroscopic survey of extremely red galaxies on the GOODS-South field, using GMOS on Gemini South. We present here spectra and redshifts for 16 ERGs at 0.87<z<2.02, to a limit K=20.2. The ERHs are a mixture of spheroidals, mergers and spirals, with one AGN. For at least 10 of these galaxies we observe [OII] emission lines. We perform an age-dating analysis by fitting the spectra and 9-band photometry of the ERGs with models of passively evolving stellar populations combined with a younger star-forming component. The best-fitting ages for the old stellar components range from 0.6 to 4.5 Gyr, with a mean 2.1 Gyr. Masses range from 3 to 20 times 10^10 solar masses. The star-forming component typically forms a few per cent of the total mass, with dust reddening averaging E(B-V)=0.35. Its timescale tends to be short for mergers (<50 Myr) and longer (200-800 Myr) for spiral ERGs.
  • We show that there has been a dramatic decline in the abundance of massive galaxies with strong Hdelta stellar absorption lines from z=1.2 to the present. These ``Hdelta-strong'', or HDS, galaxies have undergone a recent and rapid break in their star-formation activity. Combining data from the Gemini Deep Deep and the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys to make mass-matched samples (M*>=10^10.2 Msun), with 25 and 50,255 galaxies, respectively), we find that the fraction of galaxies in an HDS phase has decreased from about 50% at z=1.2 to a few percent today. This decrease in fraction is due to an actual decrease in the number density of massive HDS systems by a factor of 2-4, coupled with an increase in the number density of massive galaxies by about 30 percent. We show that this result depends only weakly on the threshold chosen for the Hdelta equivalent width to define HDS systems (if greater than 4 A) and corresponds to a (1+z)^{2.5\pm 0.7} evolution. Spectral synthesis studies of the high-redshift population using the PEGASE code, treating Hdelta_A, EW[OII], Dn4000, and rest-frame colors, favor models in which the Balmer absorption features in massive Hdelta-strong systems are the echoes of intense episodes of star-formation that faded about 1 Gyr prior to the epoch of observation. The z=1.4-2 epoch appears to correspond to a time at which massive galaxies are in transition from a mode of sustained star formation to a relatively quiescent mode with weak and rare star-formation episodes. We argue that the most likely local descendants of the distant massive HDS galaxies are passively evolving massive galaxies in the field and small groups.
  • We have undertaken deep optical imaging observations of three 6.2<z<6.5 quasar fields in the i' and z' filters. These data are used to search for foreground galaxies which are gravitationally lensing the quasars and distant galaxies physically associated with the quasars. Foreground galaxies are found closer than 5 arcsec from the lines-of-sight of two of the three quasars. However, the faintness of these galaxies suggests they have fairly low masses and provide only weak magnifications (mu<1.1). No convincing galaxies physically associated with the quasars are found and the number of i'-band dropouts is consistent with that found in random fields. We consider the expected dark matter halo masses which host these quasars under the assumption that a correlation between black hole mass and dark matter halo mass exists. We show that the steepness of the high-mass tail of the halo mass function at this redshift, combined with realistic amounts of scatter in this correlation, lead to expected halo masses substantially lower than previously believed. This analysis can explain the lack of companion galaxies found here and the low dynamical mass recently published for one of the quasars.
  • We have obtained deep, multi-band imaging observations around three of the most distant known quasars at redshifts z>6. Standard accretion theory predicts that the supermassive black holes present in these quasars were formed at a very early epoch. If a correlation between black hole mass and dark matter halo mass is present at these early times, then these rare supermassive black holes will be located inside the most massive dark matter halos. These are therefore ideal locations to search for the first clusters of galaxies. We use the Lyman-break technique to identify star-forming galaxies at high redshifts. Our observations show no overdensity of star-forming galaxies in the fields of these quasars. The lack of (dust-free) luminous starburst companions indicates that the quasars may be the only massive galaxies in their vicinity undergoing a period of intense activity.
  • We present results from a deep spectroscopic search in the 9150A atmospheric window for z~6.5 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies using the VLT/FORS2. Our multi-slit+narrow-band filter survey covers a total spatial area of 17.6 sq. arcmin in four different fields and reaches fluxes down to 5x10^(-18) erg/s/cm^2 (7 sigma detection). Our detection limit is significantly fainter than narrow-band searches at this redshift and fainter also than the unlensed brightness of Hu et al.'s HCM6A at z=6.56, and thus provides better overlap with surveys at much lower redshifts. Eighty secure emission line galaxies are detected. However, based on their clear continuum emission shortward of the line or the presence of multiple lines, none of these can be Ly-alpha emission at z~6.5. Our null result of finding no z~6.5 Ly-alpha emitters suggests that the number density of Ly-alpha emitters with L>2x10^(42) erg/s declines by ~2 between z~3 and z~6.5.
  • Hierarchical galaxy formation is the model whereby massive galaxies form from an assembly of smaller units. The most massive objects therefore form last. The model succeeds in describing the clustering of galaxies, but the evolutionary history of massive galaxies, as revealed by their visible stars and gas, is not accurately predicted. Near-infrared observations (which allow us to measure the stellar masses of high-redshift galaxies) and deep multi-colour images indicate that a large fraction of the stars in massive galaxies form in the first 5 Gyr, but uncertainties remain owing to the lack of spectra to confirm the redshifts (which are estimated from the colours) and the role of obscuration by dust. Here we report the results of a spectroscopic redshift survey that probes the most massive and quiescent galaxies back to an era only 3 Gyr after the Big Bang. We find that at least two-thirds of massive galaxies have appeared since this era, but also that a significant fraction of them are already in place in the early Universe.
  • We report spectroscopic detection of three z~6 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies, in the vicinity of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, from the early data of the Gemini Lyman-$\alpha$ at Reionisation Era (GLARE) project. Two objects, GLARE#3001 (z =5.79) and GLARE#3011 (z =5.94), are new detections and are fainter in $z'$ (z'_{AB} =26.37 and 27.15) than any Lyman break galaxy previously detected in Lyman-alpha. A third object, GLARE#1042 (z =5.83) has previously been detected in line emission from the ground; we report here a new spectroscopic continuum detection. Gemini/GMOS-S spectra of these objects, obtained using nod & shuffle, are presented together with a discussion of their photometric properties. All three objects were selected for spectroscopy via the i-drop Lyman Break technique, the two new detections from the GOODS v1.0 imaging data. The red i'-z' colors and high equivalent widths of these objects suggest a high-confidence z>5 Lyman-alpha identification of the emission lines. This brings the total number of known z>5 galaxies within 9 arcmin of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to four, of which three are at the same redshift (z=5.8 within 2000 km/s suggesting the existence of a large-scale structure at this redshift.
  • The Gemini Deep Deep Survey (GDDS) is an ultra-deep (K<20.6 mag, I<24.5 mag) redshift survey targeting galaxies in the "redshift desert" between 1<z<2. The primary goal of the survey is to constrain the space density at high redshift of evolved high-mass galaxies. We obtained 309 spectra in four widely-separated 30 arcmin^2 fields using the Gemini North telescope and the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS). The spectra define a one-in-two sparse sample of the reddest and most luminous galaxies near the I-K vs. I color-magnitude track mapped out by passively evolving galaxies in the redshift interval 0.8<z<1.8. This sample is augmented by a one-in-seven sparse sample of the remaining high-redshift galaxy population. Typical exposures times were 20-30 hours per field (in Nod & Shuffle mode), and the resulting spectra are the deepest ever obtained. In this paper we present our sample of 309 spectra, along with redshifts, identifications of spectral features, and photometry. The infrared selection underlying the survey means that the GDDS is observing not only star-forming galaxies, as in most high-redshift galaxy surveys, but also quiescent evolved galaxies. The median redshift of the whole GDDS sample is z=1.1. Together with the data and catalogs, we present a summary of the criteria for selecting the GDDS fields, the rationale behind our mask designs, an analysis of the completeness of the survey, and a description of the data reduction procedures used. All data from the GDDS are publicly available. (ABRIDGED)
  • This paper has been temporarily withdrawn by the authors. Subsequent observations with the VLT have shown that the high equivalent width line emission from the candidate z=6.4 galaxy most likely is associated with an unusually strong lined low redshift galaxy to the north west. The paper will be revised accordingly and resubmitted.
  • The Gemini Multiobject Spectrograph (GMOS) installed on the Gemini-North telescope has a facility for integral field spectroscopy over the wavelength range 0.4-1.0um. GMOS is converted to this mode by the remote insertion of an integral field unit (IFU) into the beam in place of the masks used for multiobject spectroscopy. With the IFU deployed, integral field spectroscopy is available over a fully-filled contiguous field of 5 x 7 arcsec with a sampling of 0.2 arcsec. A separate field of half the area, but otherwise identical, is also provided to aid background subtraction. The IFU contains 1500 lenslet-coupled fibres and is the largest-format fibre-based IFU yet tested on the sky and the first facility of any type for integral field spectroscopy employed on an 8/10m telescope. We describe the IFU and present results from commissioning.
  • An exquisite gravitational arc with a radius of 2.1" has been discovered around the z = 0.938 field elliptical galaxy CFRS03.1077 during HST observations of Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS) fields. Spectroscopic observations of the arc show that the redshift of the resolved lensed galaxy is z = 2.941. This gravitational lens-source system is well-fitted using the position angle and ellipticity derived from the visible matter distribution and an isothermal mass profile with a mass corresponding to sigma =387+-5 km/s. Surprisingly, given the evidence for passive evolution of elliptical galaxies, this is in good agreement with an estimate based on the fundamental plane for z = 0 ellipticals. This, perhaps, indicates that this galaxy has not shared in the significant evolution observed for average elliptical galaxies at z ~ 1. A second elliptical galaxy with similar luminosity from the CFRS survey, CFRS 14.1311 at z=0.807, is also a lens but in this case the lens model gives a much smaller mass-to-light ratio, i.e., it appears to confirm the expected evolution. This suggests that this pair of field elliptical galaxies may have very different evolutionary histories, a significant result if confirmed. Clearly, CFRS03.1077 demonstrates that these "Einstein rings" are powerful probes of high redshift galaxies.
  • A number of design options for image slicers for NGST and Gemini are being investigated. These image slicers are all of the focussing type and both refractive and reflective solutions are being explored. One such device, an image slicer that focuses 10 slices on a spectrograph slit is now in operation at the McMath Solar telescope. It consists of three lenslet arrays, and additionally acts as a focal reducer and provides correction for astigmatism of the telescope. A combined refractive and reflective slicer designed for use on NGST delivers near-diffraction limited images for up to 40 slices.