• We use high-resolution continuum images obtained at 870microns with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to probe the surface density of star-formation in z~2 galaxies and study the different physical properties between galaxies within and above the star-formation main sequence of galaxies. This sample of eight star-forming galaxies at z~2 selected among the most massive Herschel galaxies in the GOODS-South field is supplemented with eleven galaxies from the public data of the 1.3 mm survey of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field. ALMA reveals systematically dense concentrations of dusty star-formation close to the center of the stellar component of the galaxies. We identify two different starburst regimes: (i) the classical population of starbursts located above the SFR-M* main sequence, with enhanced gas fractions and short depletion times and (ii) a sub-population of galaxies located within the scatter of the main sequence that experience compact star formation with depletion timescales typical of starbursts of ~150 Myr. In both starburst populations, the far infrared and UV are distributed in distinct regions and dust-corrected star formation rates estimated using UV-optical-NIR data alone underestimate the total star formation rate. Starbursts hidden in the main sequence show instead the lowest gas fractions of our sample and could represent the last stage of star-formation before they become passive. Being Herschel-selected, these main sequence galaxies are located in the high-mass end of the main sequence, hence we do not know whether these "starbursts hidden in the main sequence" also exist below 10^11 Msun. Active galactic nuclei are found to be ubiquitous in these compact starbursts, suggesting that the triggering mechanism also feeds the central black hole or that the active nucleus triggers star formation.
  • We obtained ALMA spectroscopy and imaging to investigate the origin of the unexpected sub-mm emission toward the most distant quiescent galaxy known to date, ZF-COSMOS-20115 at z=3.717. We show here that this sub-mm emission is produced by another massive, compact and extremely obscured galaxy, located only 3.1 kpc away from the quiescent galaxy. We dub the quiescent and dusty galaxies Jekyll and Hyde, respectively. No dust emission is detected at the location of Jekyll, implying SFR < 13 Msun/yr, which is the most stringent upper limit ever obtained for a quiescent galaxy at these redshifts. The two sources are confirmed to lie at the same redshift thanks to the detection of [CII]158 in Hyde, which provides one the few robust redshifts for an "H-dropout" galaxy. The line has a rotating-disk velocity profile blueshifted from Jekyll by 549+/-60 km/s, demonstrating that it is produced by another galaxy. Careful de-blending of the Spitzer imaging confirms the existence of Hyde, and its non-detection with Hubble requires extreme attenuation by dust. Modeling the photometry of both galaxies shows that Jekyll has fully quenched >200 Myr prior to observation and still presents a challenge for models, while Hyde only harbors moderate star-formation (SFR<120 Msun/yr) and is located at least a factor 1.4 below the z~4 main sequence. Hyde could also have stopped forming stars <200 Myr before being observed, which would be consistent with its hight compactness similar to z~4 quiescent galaxies and its low [CII]/FIR ratio, but significant SF cannot be ruled out. Finally, we show that Hyde hosts a dense reservoir of gas comparable to that of extreme starbursts, suggesting that its SFR was reduced without expelling the gas outside of the galaxy. We argue that Jekyll and Hyde can be seen as two stages of quenching, and provide a unique laboratory to study this poorly understood phenomenon. [abridged]
  • We present a new, publicly available library of dust spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs are characterized by only three parameters: the dust mass (Mdust), the dust temperature (Tdust), and the mid-to-total infrared color (IR8=LIR/L8). The latter measures the relative contribution of PAH molecules to the LIR. We used this library to model star-forming galaxies at 0.5<z<4 in the CANDELS fields, using both individual detections and stacks of Herschel and ALMA imaging, and extending this sample to z=0 using the Herschel Reference Survey. At first order, the dust SED of a galaxy was found independent of stellar mass, but evolving with redshift. We found trends of increasing Tdust and IR8 with redshift and distance from the SFR--Mstar main sequence (MS), and quantified for the first time their intrinsic scatter. Half of the observed variation of these parameters was captured by these empirical relations, with residual scatters of 12% and 0.18 dex, respectively. Second order variations with stellar mass are discussed. Building on these results, we constructed high-fidelity mock galaxy catalogs to predict the accuracy of LIR and Mdust determined from a single flux measurement. Using a single JWST MIRI band, we found that LIR is typically uncertain by 0.15 dex, with a maximum of 0.25 dex when probing the rest-frame 8 um, and this is not significantly impacted by typical redshift uncertainties. On the other hand, we found that ALMA bands 8-to-7 and 6-to-3 measure Mdust at better than 0.2 and 0.15 dex, respectively, and independently of redshift, while bands 9-to-6 only measure LIR at better than 0.2 dex at z>1, 3.2, 3.8, and 5.7, respectively. Starburst galaxies above the MS have LIR significantly underestimated and Mdust overestimated. These results can be used immediately to interpret more accurately the large amount of archival data from Spitzer, Herschel and ALMA. [abridged]
  • We derive the SFH of MS galaxies showing how the SFH peak of a galaxy depends on its seed mass at e.g. z=5. Following the MS, galaxies undergo a drastic slow down of their stellar mass growth after reaching the peak of their SFH. According to abundance matching, these masses correspond to hot and massive DM halos which state could results in less efficient gas inflows on the galaxies and thus could be at the origin of the limited stellar mass growth. As a result, galaxies on the MS can enter the passive region of the UVJ diagram while still forming stars. The ability of the classical analytical SFHs to retrieve the SFR of galaxies from SED fitting is studied. Due to mathematical limitations, the exp-declining and delayed SFH struggle to model high SFR which starts to be problematic at z>2. The exp-rising and log-normal SFHs exhibit the opposite behavior with the ability to reach very high SFR, and thus model starburst galaxies, but not low values such as those expected at low redshift for massive galaxies. We show that these four analytical forms recover the SFR of MS galaxies with an error dependent on the model and the redshift. They are, however, sensitive enough to probe small variations of SFR within the MS but all the four fail to recover the SFR of rapidly quenched galaxies. However, these SFHs lead to an artificial gradient of age, parallel to the MS which is not exhibited by a simulated sample. This gradient is also produced on real data, using a sample of GOODS-South galaxies at 1.5<z<1.2. We propose a SFH composed of a delayed form to model the bulk of stellar population plus a flexibility in the recent SFH. This SFH provides very good estimates of the SFR of MS, starbursts, and rapidly quenched galaxies at all z. Furthermore, used on the GOODS-South sample, the age gradient disappears, showing its dependency on the SFH assumption made to perform the SED fitting.
  • HE0450-2958, an interacting quasar-starburst galaxy pair at $z$ = 0.285, is one of the best known examples of strong star formation activity in the presence of a quasar-driven jet. We present new multi-band JVLA-imaging covering 1 to 6 GHz and reaching an angular resolution of up to $0{}_{{}^.}^{"}6$ (a 6-fold improvement over existing radio data). We confirm the previous detection of a spatially extended radio component around the quasar indicating that there is on-going star formation activity in the quasar host galaxy. For the first time, we directly detect a jet-like bipolar outflow from the quasar aligned with its companion star-forming galaxy (SFG) and several blobs of ionized gas in its vicinity identified in previous studies. Within the companion SFG we find evidence for a flattening of the synchrotron spectral index towards the point of intersection with the jet axis, further suggesting that the outflow may actually be impacting its interstellar medium (ISM). We discuss two possible mechanisms that could have triggered the starburst in the companion SFG: a wet-dry merger with the quasar and jet-induced star formation. While triggering through interaction-driven gas dynamics cannot be excluded with current data, our new observations make HE0450-2958 a strong candidate for jet-induced star formation, and one of the rare links between local systems (like Minkowski's Object or Centaurus A) and the high-z regime where radio-optical alignments suggest that this phenomenon could be more common.
  • In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$).
  • We study the molecular gas properties of high-$z$ galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets a $\sim1$ arcmin$^2$ region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3mm and 1mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities $L_{\rm{}IR}>10^{11}$ L$_\odot$, i.e. a detection in CO emission was expected. Out these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than typically found in starburst/SMG/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star-formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): The CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-$L_{\rm{}IR}$ envelope of the scatter in the $L_{\rm{}IR}-L'_{\rm{}CO}$ relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of $\sim$ 1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ($M_{\rm{}H2}$/$M_*$) is consistent with earlier measurements of main sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor $\sim$2-5$\times$ smaller than those based on CO. Accounting for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.
  • We report the discovery of a remarkable concentration of massive galaxies with extended X-ray emission at $z_{spec} = 2.506$, which contains 11 massive ($M_{*} \gtrsim 10^{11} M_{\odot}$) galaxies in the central 80kpc region (11.6$\sigma$ overdensity). We have spectroscopically confirmed 17 member galaxies with 11 from CO and the remaining ones from $H\alpha$. The X-ray luminosity, stellar mass content and velocity dispersion all point to a collapsed, cluster-sized dark matter halo with mass $M_{200c} = 10^{13.9\pm0.2} M_{\odot}$, making it the most distant X-ray-detected cluster known to date. Unlike other clusters discovered so far, this structure is dominated by star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the core with only 2 out of the 11 massive galaxies classified as quiescent. The star formation rate (SFR) in the 80kpc core reaches $\sim$3400 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ with a gas depletion time of $\sim 200$ Myr, suggesting that we caught this cluster in rapid build-up of a dense core. The high SFR is driven by both a high abundance of SFGs and a higher starburst fraction ($\sim25\%$, compared to 3\%-5\% in the field). The presence of both a collapsed, cluster-sized halo and a predominant population of massive SFGs suggests that this structure could represent an important transition phase between protoclusters and mature clusters. It provides evidence that the main phase of massive galaxy passivization will take place after galaxies accrete onto the cluster, providing new insights into massive cluster formation at early epochs. The large integrated stellar mass at such high redshift challenges our understanding of massive cluster formation.
  • We make use of deep 1.2mm-continuum observations (12.7microJy/beam RMS) of a 1 arcmin^2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to probe dust-enshrouded star formation from 330 Lyman-break galaxies spanning the redshift range z=2-10 (to ~2-3 Msol/yr at 1sigma over the entire range). Given the depth and area of ASPECS, we would expect to tentatively detect 35 galaxies extrapolating the Meurer z~0 IRX-beta relation to z>~2 (assuming T_d~35 K). However, only 6 tentative detections are found at z>~2 in ASPECS, with just three at >3sigma. Subdividing z=2-10 galaxies according to stellar mass, UV luminosity, and UV-continuum slope and stacking the results, we only find a significant detection in the most massive (>10^9.75 Msol) subsample, with an infrared excess (IRX=L_{IR}/L_{UV}) consistent with previous z~2 results. However, the infrared excess we measure from our large selection of sub-L* (<10^9.75 Msol) galaxies is 0.11(-0.42)(+0.32) and 0.14(-0.14)(+0.15) at z=2-3 and z=4-10, respectively, lying below even an SMC IRX-beta relation (95% confidence). These results demonstrate the relevance of stellar mass for predicting the IR luminosity of z>~2 galaxies. We furthermore find that the evolution of the IRX-stellar mass relationship depends on the evolution of the dust temperature. If the dust temperature increases monotonically with redshift (as (1+z)^0.32) such that T_d~44-50 K at z>=4, current results are suggestive of little evolution in this relationship to z~6. We use these results to revisit recent estimates of the z>~3 SFR density. One less obvious implication is in interpreting the high Halpha EWs seen in z~5 galaxies: our results imply that star-forming galaxies produce Lyman-continuum photons at twice the efficiency (per unit UV luminosity) as implied in conventional models. Star-forming galaxies can then reionize the Universe, even if the escape fraction is <10%.
  • We present the rationale for and the observational description of ASPECS: The ALMA SPECtroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF), the cosmological deep field that has the deepest multi-wavelength data available. Our overarching goal is to obtain an unbiased census of molecular gas and dust continuum emission in high-redshift (z$>$0.5) galaxies. The $\sim$1$'$ region covered within the UDF was chosen to overlap with the deepest available imaging from HST. Our ALMA observations consist of full frequency scans in band 3 (84-115 GHz) and band 6 (212-272 GHz) at approximately uniform line sensitivity ($L'_{\rm CO}\sim$2$\times$10$^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$), and continuum noise levels of 3.8 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ and 12.7 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$, respectively. The molecular surveys cover the different rotational transitions of the CO molecule, leading to essentially full redshift coverage. The [CII] emission line is also covered at redshifts $6.0<z<8.0$. We present a customized algorithm to identify line candidates in the molecular line scans, and quantify our ability to recover artificial sources from our data. Based on whether multiple CO lines are detected, and whether optical spectroscopic redshifts as well as optical counterparts exist, we constrain the most likely line identification. We report 10 (11) CO line candidates in the 3mm (1mm) band, and our statistical analysis shows that $<$4 of these (in each band) are likely spurious. Less than 1/3 of the total CO flux in the low-J CO line candidates are from sources that are not associated with an optical/NIR counterpart. We also present continuum maps of both the band 3 and band 6 observations. The data presented here form the basis of a number of dedicated studies that are presented in subsequent papers.
  • In this paper we study the causes of the reported mass-dependence of the slope of SFR-M* relation, the so-called "Main Sequence" of star-forming galaxies, and discuss its implication on the physical processes that shaped the star formation history of massive galaxies over cosmic time. We use the CANDELS near-IR imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope to perform the bulge-to-disk decomposition of distant galaxies and measure for the first time the slope of the SFR-Mdisk relation at z=1. We find that this relation follows very closely the shape of the SFR-M* correlation, still with a pronounced flattening at the high-mass end. This is clearly excluding, at least at z=1, the secular growth of quiescent bulges in star-forming galaxies as the main driver for the change of slope of the Main Sequence. Then, by stacking the Herschel data available in the CANDELS field, we estimate the total gas mass and the star formation efficiency at different positions on the SFR-M* relation. We find that the relatively low SFRs observed in massive galaxies (M* > 5e10 Msun) are caused by a decreased star formation efficiency, by up to a factor of 3 as compared to lower stellar mass galaxies, and not by a reduced gas content. The trend at the lowest masses is likely linked to the dominance of atomic over molecular gas. We argue that this stellar-mass-dependent SFE can explain the varying slope of the Main Sequence since z=1.5, hence over 70% of the Hubble time. The drop of SFE occurs at lower masses in the local Universe (M* > 2e10 Msun) and is not present at z=2. Altogether this provides evidence for a slow downfall of the star formation efficiency in massive Main Sequence galaxies. The resulting loss of star formation is found to be rising starting from z=2 to reach a level comparable to the mass growth of the quiescent population by z=1. We finally discuss the possible physical origin of this phenomenon.
  • We explore star-formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies based on the evolution of the star-formation rate stellar mass relation (SFR-M*). Using data from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) in combination with far-IR imaging from the Spitzer and Herschel observatories we measure the SFR-M* relation at 0.5 < z < 4. Similar to recent works we find that the average infrared SEDs of galaxies are roughly consistent with a single infrared template across a broad range of redshifts and stellar masses, with evidence for only weak deviations. We find that the SFR-M* relation is not consistent with a single power-law of the form SFR ~ M*^a at any redshift; it has a power-law slope of a~1 at low masses, and becomes shallower above a turnover mass (M_0) that ranges from 10^9.5 - 10^10.8 Msol, with evidence that M_0 increases with redshift. We compare our measurements to results from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations, and find general agreement in the slope of the SFR-M* relation albeit with systematic offsets. We use the evolving SFR-M* sequence to generate SFHs, finding that typical SFRs of individual galaxies rise at early times and decline after reaching a peak. This peak occurs earlier for more massive galaxies. We integrate these SFHs to generate mass-growth histories and compare to the implied mass-growth from the evolution of the stellar mass function. We find that these two estimates are in broad qualitative agreement, but that there is room for improvement at a more detailed level. At early times the SFHs suggest mass-growth rates that are as much as 10x higher than inferred from the stellar mass function. However, at later times the SFHs under-predict the inferred evolution, as is expected in the case of additional growth due to mergers.
  • At z>1, the distinction between merging and 'normal' star-forming galaxies based on single band morphology is often hampered by the presence of large clumps which result in a disturbed, merger-like appearance even in rotationally supported disks. In this paper we discuss how a classification based on canonical, non-parametric structural indices measured on resolved stellar mass maps, rather than on single-band images, reduces the misclassification of clumpy but not merging galaxies. We calibrate the mass-based selection of mergers using the MIRAGE hydrodynamical numerical simulations of isolated and merging galaxies which span a stellar mass range of $10^{9.8}$-$10^{10.6}M_{sun}$ and merger ratios between 1:1-1:6.3. These simulations are processed to reproduce the typical depth and spatial resolution of observed HUDF data. We test our approach on a sample of real z~2 galaxies with kinematic classification into disks or mergers and on ~100 galaxies in the HUDF field with photometric/spectroscopic redshift between 1.5$\leqslant z \leqslant$3 and $M>10^{9.4}M_{sun}$. We find that a combination of the asymmetry $A_{MASS}$ and $M_{20, MASS}$ indices measured on the stellar mass maps can efficiently identify real (major) mergers with $\lesssim$20% contamination from clumpy disks in the merger sample. This mass-based classification cannot be reproduced in star-forming galaxies by $H-$band measurements alone, which instead result in a contamination from clumpy galaxies that can be as high as 50%. Moreover, we find that the mass-based classification always results in a lower contamination from clumpy galaxies than an $H-$band classification, regardless of the depth of the imaging used (e.g., CANDELS vs. HUDF).
  • We use deep panchromatic datasets in the GOODS-N field, from GALEX to the deepest Herschel far-infrared and VLA radio continuum imaging, to explore, using mass-complete samples, the evolution of the star formation activity and dust attenuation of star-forming galaxies to z~4. Our main results can be summarized as follows: i) the slope of the SFR-M correlation is consistent with being constant, and equal to ~0.8 at least up to z~1.5, while its normalization keeps increasing with redshift; ii) for the first time here we are able to explore the FIR-radio correlation for a mass-selected sample of star-forming galaxies: the correlation does not evolve up to z~4; iii) we confirm that galaxy stellar mass is a robust proxy for UV dust attenuation in star-forming galaxies, with more massive galaxies being more dust attenuated, strikingly we find that this attenuation relation evolves very weakly with redshift, the amount of dust attenuation increasing by less than 0.3 magnitudes over the redshift range [0.5-4] for a fixed stellar mass, as opposed to a tenfold increase of star formation rate; iv) the correlation between dust attenuation and the UV spectral slope evolves in redshift, with the median UV spectral slope of star-forming galaxies becoming bluer with redshift. By z~3, typical UV slopes are inconsistent, given the measured dust attenuation, with the predictions of commonly used empirical laws. Finally, building on existing results, we show that gas reddening is marginally larger (by a factor of around 1.3) than stellar reddening at all redshifts probed, and also that the amount of dust attenuation at a fixed ISM metallicity increases with redshift. We speculate that our results support evolving ISM conditions of typical star-forming galaxies such that at z~1.5 Main Sequence galaxies have ISM conditions getting closer to those of local starbursts.
  • We present an analysis of the deepest Herschel images in four major extragalactic fields GOODS-North, GOODS-South, UDS and COSMOS obtained within the GOODS-Herschel and CANDELS-Herschel key programs. The picture provided by 10497 individual far-infrared detections is supplemented by the stacking analysis of a mass-complete sample of 62361 star-forming galaxies from the CANDELS-HST H band-selected catalogs and from two deep ground-based Ks band-selected catalogs in the GOODS-North and the COSMOS-wide fields, in order to obtain one of the most accurate and unbiased understanding to date of the stellar mass growth over the cosmic history. We show, for the first time, that stacking also provides a powerful tool to determine the dispersion of a physical correlation and describe our method called "scatter stacking" that may be easily generalized to other experiments. We demonstrate that galaxies of all masses from z=4 to 0 follow a universal scaling law, the so-called main sequence of star-forming galaxies. We find a universal close-to-linear slope of the logSFR-logM* relation with evidence for a flattening of the main sequence at high masses (log(M*/Msun) > 10.5) that becomes less prominent with increasing redshift and almost vanishes by z~2. This flattening may be due to the parallel stellar growth of quiescent bulges in star-forming galaxies. Within the main sequence, we measure a non varying SFR dispersion of 0.3 dex. The specific SFR (sSFR=SFR/M*) of star-forming galaxies is found to continuously increase from z=0 to 4. Finally we discuss the implications of our findings on the cosmic SFR history and show that more than 2/3 of present-day stars must have formed in a regime dominated by the main sequence mode. As a consequence we conclude that, although omnipresent in the distant Universe, galaxy mergers had little impact in shaping the global star formation history over the last 12.5 Gyr.
  • We measure the dust and gas content of the three sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the GN20 proto-cluster at $z=4.05$ using new IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) CO(4-3) and 1.2-3.3 mm continuum observations. All these three SMGs are heavily dust obscured, with UV-based star formation rate (SFR) estimates significantly smaller than the ones derived from the bolometric infrared (IR), consistent with the spatial offsets revealed by HST and CO imaging. Based also on evaluations of the specific SFR, CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor and gas depletion timescale, we classify all the three galaxies as starbursts (SBs), although with a lower confidence for GN20.2b that might be a later stage merging event. We place our measurements in the context of the evolutionary properties of main sequence (MS) and SB galaxies. ULIRGs have 3-5 times larger $L'_{\rm CO}/M_{\rm dust}$ and $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ ratios than $z=0$ MS galaxies, but by $z\sim2$ the difference appears to be blurred, probably due to differential metallicity evolution. SB galaxies appear to slowly evolve in their $L'_{\rm CO}/M_{\rm dust}$ and $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ ratios all the way to $z>6$ (consistent with rapid enrichment of SB events), while MS galaxies rapidly increase in $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ from $z=0$ to 2 (due to gas fraction increase, compensated by a decrease of metallicities). While no IR/submm continuum detection is available for indisputably normal massive galaxies at $z>2.5$, we show that if metallicity indeed decrease rapidly for these systems at $z>3$ as claimed in the literature, we should expect a strong decrease of their $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$, consistent with recent PdBI and ALMA upper limits. We conclude that the $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ ratio could be a powerful tool for distinguishing starbursts from normal galaxies at $z>4$.
  • We study the mid-infrared (IR) excess emission of early-type galaxies (ETGs) on the red-sequence at $z <$ 1 using a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). In the mass-limited sample of 1025 galaxies with $M_{star}$ $>$ 10$^{10.5}$ $M_{\odot}$ and $0.4<z<1.05$, we identify 696 $Spitzer$ 24 $\mu$m detected (above the 5$\sigma$) galaxies and find them to have a wide range of NUV-$r$ and $r$-[12 $\mu$m] colors despite their red optical $u-r$ colors. Even in the sample of very massive ETGs on the red sequence with $M_{star}$ $>$ 10$^{11.2}$ $M_{\odot}$, more than 18% show excess emission over the photospheric emission in the mid-IR. The combination with the results of red ETGs in the local universe suggests that the recent star formation is not rare among quiescent, red ETGs at least out to $z \sim 1$ if the mid-IR excess emission results from intermediate-age stars or/and from low-level ongoing star formation. Our color$-$color diagram including near-UV and mid-IR emissions are efficient not only for identifying ETGs with recent star formation, but also for distinguishing quiescent galaxies from dusty star-forming galaxies.
  • We present deep IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) observations, searching for CO-emission toward two massive, non-lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z=3.216 and 4.058. With one low significance CO detection (3.5 sigma) and one sensitive upper limit, we find that the CO lines are >~ 3-4 times weaker than expected based on the relation between IR and CO luminosities followed by similarly, massive galaxies at z=0-2.5. This is consistent with a scenario in which these galaxies have low metallicity, causing an increased CO-to-H_2 conversion factor, i.e., weaker CO-emission for a given molecular (H_2) mass. The required metallicities at z>3 are lower than predicted by the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) at these redshifts, consistent with independent evidence. Unless our galaxies are atypical in this respect, detecting molecular gas in normal galaxies at z>3 may thus remain challenging even with ALMA.
  • Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (<50Myr), like molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (~300Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7pc resolution AMR simulations of high-redshift disks including photo-ionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback (Renaud et al. 2013, and Perret et al., this astro-ph issue). Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (<=200Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can re-accrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies, without rapid dispersion and reformation of clumps.
  • In the local Universe, galaxy properties show a strong dependence on environment. In cluster cores, early type galaxies dominate, whereas star-forming galaxies are more and more common in the outskirts. At higher redshifts and in somewhat less dense environments (e.g. galaxy groups), the situation is less clear. One open issue is that of whether and how the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies in groups depends on the distance from the centre of mass. To shed light on this topic, we have built a sample of X-ray selected galaxy groups at 0<z<1.6 in various blank fields (ECDFS, COSMOS, GOODS). We use a sample of spectroscopically confirmed group members with stellar mass M >10^10.3 M_sun in order to have a high spectroscopic completeness. As we use only spectroscopic redshifts, our results are not affected by uncertainties due to projection effects. We use several SFR indicators to link the star formation (SF) activity to the galaxy environment. Taking advantage of the extremely deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations, we have an accurate, broad-band measure of the SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies. We use multi-wavelength SED fitting techniques to estimate the stellar masses of all objects and the SFR of the MIPS and PACS undetected galaxies. We analyse the dependence of the SF activity, stellar mass and specific SFR on the group-centric distance, up to z~1.6, for the first time. We do not find any correlation between the mean SFR and group-centric distance at any redshift. We do not observe any strong mass segregation either, in agreement with predictions from simulations. Our results suggest that either groups have a much smaller spread in accretion times with respect to the clusters and that the relaxation time is longer than the group crossing time.
  • We characterize the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is 0.3 < z < 1 star-forming galaxies by applying multi-wavelength AGN diagnostics (X-ray, optical, mid-infrared, radio) to a sample of galaxies selected at 70-micron from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy survey (FIDEL). Given the depth of FIDEL, we detect "normal" galaxies on the specific star formation rate (sSFR) sequence as well as starbursting systems with elevated sSFR. We find an overall high occurrence of AGN of 37+/-3%, more than twice as high as in previous studies of galaxies with comparable infrared luminosities and redshifts but in good agreement with the AGN fraction of nearby (0.05 < z < 0.1) galaxies of similar infrared luminosities. The more complete census of AGNs comes from using the recently developed Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagram. This optical diagnostic is also sensitive to X-ray weak AGNs and X-ray absorbed AGNs, and reveals that absorbed active nuclei reside almost exclusively in infrared-luminous hosts. The fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN appears to be independent of sSFR and remains elevated both on the sSFR sequence and above. In contrast, the fraction of AGNs that are X-ray absorbed increases substantially with increasing sSFR, possibly due to an increased gas fraction and/or gas density in the host galaxies.
  • [abridged] Modern (sub-)millimeter/radio interferometers will enable us to measure the dust and molecular gas emission from galaxies that have luminosities lower than the Milky Way, out to high redshifts and with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. This will provide new constraints on the star formation properties and gas reservoir in galaxies throughout cosmic times through dedicated deep field campaigns targeting the CO/[CII] lines and dust continuum emission. In this paper, we present empirical predictions for such (sub-)millimeter line and continuum deep fields. We base these predictions on the deepest available optical/near-infrared ACS and NICMOS data on the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Using a physically-motivated spectral energy distribution model, we fit the observed optical/near-infrared emission of 13,099 galaxies with redshifts up to z=5, and obtain median likelihood estimates of their stellar mass, star formation rate, dust attenuation and dust luminosity. We derive statistical constraints on the dust emission in the infrared and (sub-)millimeter which are consistent with the observed optical/near-infrared emission in terms of energy balance. This allows us to estimate, for each galaxy, the (sub-)millimeter continuum flux densities in several ALMA, PdBI/NOEMA and JVLA bands. Using empirical relations between the observed CO/[CII] line luminosities and the infrared luminosity, we infer the flux of the CO(1-0) and [CII] lines from the estimated infrared luminosity of each galaxy in our sample. We then predict the fluxes of higher CO transition lines CO(2-1) to CO(7-6) bracketing two extreme gas excitation scenarios. We use our predictions to discuss possible deep field strategies with ALMA. The predictions presented in this study will serve as a direct benchmark for future deep field campaigns in the (sub-)millimeter regime.
  • We have compiled a large sample of 151 high redshift (z=0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 microns (S24>100 uJy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S250/S24 vs. S8.0/S3.6 and S100/S24 vs. S8.0/S3.6; both diagnostics have ~10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the WISE mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high z (z~2) star forming galaxies.
  • (Abridged) We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out with GTC/OSIRIS. SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field (130 arcmin^2) at wavelengths 500 to 950 nm and using 24 contiguous medium-band filters (spectral resolution R 50). The data reach 26.5 mag (>3-sigma level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS main goal is obtaining accurate physical properties of interm- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical SEDs with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z>1. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. We present science demonstration results about the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming and AGN) at z=0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies at 1.0<z<1.4. We discuss on the improvements introduced by the SHARDS dataset in the analysis of their SFH and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries. We find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z=1.0-1.5 are well described by an exponential decaying SFH with scale tau=100-200 Myr, age 1.5-2.0 Gyr, solar or slightly sub-solar metallicity, and moderate extinction, A(V)~0.5 mag. We also find that galaxies with masses above M* are typically older than lighter galaxies, as expected in a downsizing scenario of galaxy formation. This trend is, however, model dependent, i.e., it is significantly more evident in the results obtained with some stellar population synthesis libraries and almost absent in others.
  • We explore the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation activity on the infrared (0.3-1000 microns) spectral energy distributions of luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.5 to 4.0. We have compiled a large sample of 151 galaxies selected at 24 microns (S24 > 100 uJy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-IR spectrum into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. A significant portion (~25%) of our sample is dominated by an AGN in the mid-IR. Based on the mid-IR classification, we divide our full sample into four sub-samples: z~1 star-forming (SF) sources; z~2 SF sources; AGN with clear 9.7 micron silicate absorption; and AGN with featureless mid-IR spectra. From our large spectroscopic sample and wealth of multi-wavelength data, including deep Herschel imaging at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns, we use 95 galaxies with complete spectral coverage to create a composite spectral energy distribution (SED) for each sub-sample. We then fit a two-temperature component modified blackbody to the SEDs. We find that the IR SEDs have similar cold dust temperatures, regardless of the mid-IR power source, but display a marked difference in the warmer dust temperatures. We calculate the average effective temperature of the dust in each sub-sample and find a significant (~20 K) difference between the SF and AGN systems. We compare our composite SEDs to local templates and find that local templates do not accurately reproduce the mid-IR features and dust temperatures of our high redshift systems. High redshift IR luminous galaxies contain significantly more cool dust than their local counterparts. We find that a full suite of photometry spanning the IR peak is necessary to accurately account for the dominant dust temperature components in high redshift IR luminous galaxies.