• In the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers and sMDT chambers with half of the tube diameter of the MDTs are used for precision muon track reconstruction. The sMDT chambers are designed for operation at high counting rates due to neutron and gamma background irradiation expected for the HL-LHC and future hadron colliders. The existing MDT read-out electronics uses bipolar signal shaping which causes an undershoot of opposite polarity and same charge after a signal pulse. At high counting rates and short electronics dead time used for the sMDTs, signal pulses pile up on the undershoot of preceding background pulses leading to a reduction of the signal amplitude and a jitter in the drift time measurement and, therefore, to a degradation of drift tube efficiency and spatial resolution. In order to further increase the rate capability of sMDT tubes, baseline restoration can be used in the read-out electronics to suppress the pile-up effects. A discrete bipolar shaping circuit with baseline restoration has been developed and used for reading out sMDT tubes under irradiation with a 24 MBq 90Sr source. The measurements results show a substantial improvement of the performance of the sMDT tubes at high counting rates.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the the next generation facility of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes; two sites will cover both hemispheres. CTA will reach unprecedented sensitivity, energy and angular resolution in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. Each CTA array will include four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), designed to cover the low-energy range of the CTA sensitivity ($\sim$20 GeV to 200 GeV). In the baseline LST design, the focal-plane camera will be instrumented with 265 photodetector clusters; each will include seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with an entrance window of 1.5 inches in diameter. The PMT design is based on mature and reliable technology. Recently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging as a competitor. Currently, SiPMs have advantages (e.g. lower operating voltage and tolerance to high illumination levels) and disadvantages (e.g. higher capacitance and cross talk rates), but this technology is still young and rapidly evolving. SiPM technology has a strong potential to become superior to the PMT one in terms of photon detection efficiency and price per square mm of detector area. While the advantage of SiPMs has been proven for high-density, small size cameras, it is yet to be demonstrated for large area cameras such as the one of the LST. We are working to develop a SiPM-based module for the LST camera, in view of a possible camera upgrade. We will describe the solutions we are exploring in order to balance a competitive performance with a minimal impact on the overall LST camera design.
  • So far the current ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) have energy thresholds in the best case in the range of ~30 to 50 GeV (H.E.S.S. II and MAGIC telescopes). Lowest energy gamma-ray showers produce low light intensity images and cannot be efficiently separated from dominating images from hadronic background. A cost effective way of improving the telescope performance at lower energies is to use novel photosensors with superior photon detection efficiency (PDE). Currently the best commercially available superbialkali photomultipliers (PMTs) have a PDE of about 30-33%, whereas the silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs, also known as MPPC, GAPD) from some manufacturers show a photon detection efficiency of about 40-45%. Using these devices can lower the energy threshold of the instrument and may improve the background rejection due to intrinsic properties of SiPMs such as a superb single photoelectron resolution. Compared to PMTs, SiPMs are more compact, fast in response, operate at low voltage, and are insensitive to magnetic fields. SiPMs can be operated at high background illumination, which would allow to operate the IACT also during partial moonlight, dusk and dawn, hence increasing the instrument duty cycle. We are testing the SiPMs for Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and CTA. Here we present an overview of our setup and first measurements, which we perform in two independent laboratories, in Munich, Germany and in Barcelona, Spain.