• DGRAV News: We hear that .... APS April Meeting Town Hall Meeting Conference Reports: Hawking Conference Benasque workshop 2017 QIQG 3 Obituary: Remembering Cecile De Witt-Morette
  • This is an overview article of the mathematics of gravitational waves. We explain the mathematics and physics of these waves in general relativity theory, discuss the gravitational wave experiment aLIGO and their detection of gravitational waves as well as its implications for astrophysics. A version of this article was published in the AMS Notices, Vol. 64, Issue 07, 2017, (August issue 2017).
  • We explicitly calculate the gravitational wave memory effect for classical point particle sources in linearized gravity off of an even dimensional Minkowski background. We show that there is no memory effect in $d>4$ dimensions, in agreement with the general analysis of Hollands, Ishibashi, and Wald (2016).
  • DGRAV News: We hear that .... DGRAV student travel grants Research Briefs: The Discovery of GW170104 Obituary: Remembering Vishu Remembering Cecile DeWitt-Morette Remembering Larry Shepley Remembering Marcus Ansorg Conference Reports: EGM20
  • We examine gravitational wave memory in the case where sources and detector are in a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. We consider the case where the universe can be highly inhomogeneous, but the gravitatational radiation is treated in the short wavelength approximation. We find results very similar to those of gravitational wave memory in an asymptotically flat spacetime; however, the overall magnitude of the memory effect is enhanced by a redshift-dependent factor. In addition, we find the memory can be affected by lensing.
  • The classical approach to spacetime singularities leads to a simplified dynamics in which spatial derivatives become unimportant compared to time derivatives, and thus each spatial point essentially becomes uncoupled from its neighbors. This uncoupled dynamics leads to sharp features (called "spikes") as follows: particular spatial points follow an exceptional dynamical path that differs from that of their neighbors, with the consequence that, in the neighborhood of these exceptional points, the spatial profile becomes ever more sharp. Spikes are consequences of the BKL-type oscillatory evolution towards generic singularities of spacetime. Do spikes persist when the spacetime dynamics is treated using quantum mechanics? To address this question, we treat a Hamiltonian system that describes the dynamics of the approach to the singularity and consider how to quantize that system. We argue that this particular system is best treated using an affine quantization approach (rather than the more familiar methods of canonical quantization) and we set up the formalism needed for this treatment. Our investigation, based on this affine approach, shows the nonexistence of quantum spikes.
  • DGRAV News: we hear that ... DGRAV program at the APS meeting in Washington D.C. Obituary: Remembering John Stewart Conference Reports: CPT and Lorentz Symmetry
  • Carl Bender and collaborators have developed a quantum theory governed by Hamiltonians that are PT-symmetric rather than Hermitian. To implement this theory, the inner product was redefined to guarantee positive norms of eigenstates of the Hamiltonian. In the general case, which includes arbitrary time-dependence in the Hamiltonian, a modification of the Schrodinger equation is necessary as shown by Gong and Wang to conserve probability. In this paper, we derive the following selection rule: transitions induced by time dependence in a PT-symmetric Hamiltonian cannot occur between normalized states of differing PT-norm. We show three examples of this selection rule in action: two matrix models and one in the continuum.
  • We perform numerical simulations of gravitational collapse in Einstein-aether theory. We find that under certain conditions, the collapse results in the temporary formation of a white hole horizon.
  • A simple estimate is given of gravitational wave memory for the inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. Here the memory is proportional to the total energy radiated and has a simple angular dependence. This estimate might be helpful as a consistency check for numerical relativity memory waveforms.
  • DGRAV News: DGRAV we hear that.... Research Briefs: GW150914 Obituaries: Remembering Felix Pirani Remembering David Finkelstein Steve, the physicist Remembering Sergio Dain Editorial: Gravitational physics in the modern university
  • Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.
  • GGR News: Remembering Jacob Bekenstein we hear that ... 100 years ago GGR program at the APS meeting in Salt Lake City Conference reports: Hawking Radiation Quantum Information in Quantum Gravity Gravity-new perspectives from strings and higher dimensions
  • We examine gravitational wave memory in the case where sources and detector are in an expanding cosmology. For simplicity, we treat the case where the cosmology is de Sitter spacetime, and discuss the possibility of generalizing our results to the case of a more realistic cosmology. We find results very similar to those of gravitational wave memory in an asymptotically flat spacetime, but with the magnitude of the effect multiplied by a redshift factor.
  • GGR News: We Hear That ... Advanced LIGO in mid-2015 GGR dominates April APS meeting Conference Reports: GaryFest
  • General relativity explains gravitational radiation from binary black hole or neutron star mergers, from core-collapse supernovae and even from the inflation period in cosmology. These waves exhibit a unique effect called memory or Christodoulou effect, which in a detector like LIGO or LISA shows as a permanent displacement of test masses and in radio telescopes like NANOGrav as a change in the frequency of pulsars' pulses. It was shown that electromagnetic fields and neutrino radiation enlarge the memory. Recently it has been understood that the two types of memory addressed in the literature as `linear' and `nonlinear' are in fact two different phenomena. The former is due to fields that do not and the latter is due to fields that do reach null infinity.
  • We review the first modern singularity theorem, published by Penrose in 1965. This is the first genuine post-Einstenian result in General Relativity, where the fundamental and fruitful concept of closed trapped surface was introduced. We include historical remarks, an appraisal of the theorem's impact, and relevant current and future work that belongs to its legacy.
  • GGR News: we hear that... GR Centenial Speakers Bureau GGR $\to$ DGR GGR program at the APS meeting in Baltimore, MD Conference reports: New Frontiers in Dynamical Gravity Frontiers of Neutron Star Astrophysics Quantum Information in Quantum Gravity
  • Two different approaches to gravitational perturbation theory appear to give two different answers for the properties of gravitational wave memory. We show that this contradiction is only apparent and the two approaches actually agree.
  • We examine a simple example of gravitational wave memory due to the decay of a point particle into two point particles. In the case where one of the decay products is null, there are two types of memory: a null memory due to the null particle and an ordinary memory due to the recoiling timelike particle. In the case where both decay products are timelike, there is only ordinary memory. However, this ordinary memory can mimic the null memory in the limit where one of the decay products has a large velocity.
  • We present a perturbative treatment of gravitational wave memory. The coordinate invariance of Einstein's equations leads to a type of gauge invariance in perturbation theory. As with any gauge invariant theory, results are more clear when expressed in terms of manifestly gauge invariant quantities. Therefore we derive all our results from the perturbed Weyl tensor rather than the perturbed metric. We derive gravitational wave memory for the Einstein equations coupled to a general energy-momentum tensor that reaches null infinity.
  • GGR News: we hear that... 100 years ago GGR program at the APS meeting in Savannah, GA Conference reports: GR20/Amaldi10 Conference in Warsaw, Poland School and workshop on quantum gravity in Brazil
  • We perform a linear stability analysis of dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity in the geometric optics approximation and find that it is linearly stable on the backgrounds considered. Our analysis also reveals that gravitational waves in the modified theory travel at the speed of light in Minkowski spacetime. However, on a Schwarzschild background the characteristic speed of propagation along a given direction splits into two modes, one subluminal and one superluminal. The width of the splitting depends on the azimuthal components of the propagation vector, is linearly proportional to the mass of the black hole, and decreases with the third inverse power of the distance from the black hole. Radial propagation is unaffected, implying that as probed by gravitational waves the location of the event horizon of the spacetime is unaltered. The analysis further reveals that when a high frequency, pure gravitational wave is scattered from a black hole, a scalar wave of comparable amplitude is excited, and vice-versa.
  • GGR News: we hear that..., by David Garfinkle What's new in LIGO, by David Shoemaker News from NSF, by Pedro Marronetti Citation counts and indicies: Beware of bad data, by Clifford Will Research Briefs: Results from Planck, by William Jones Conference Reports: Gravity- Strings and Higher Dimensions, by Simon Ross Capra 16, by Leor Barack Reduced Order Modeling in General Relativity, by Michele Vallisneri
  • We present an electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory. That is, we consider what change has occurred to a detector of electromagnetic radiation after the wave has passed. Rather than a distortion in the detector, as occurs in the gravitational wave case, we find a residual velocity (a "kick") to the charges in the detector. In analogy with the two types of gravitational wave memory ("ordinary" and "nonlinear") we find two types of electromagnetic kick.