• We present deep Magellan/Megacam stellar photometry of four recently discovered faint Milky Way satellites: Sagittarius II (Sgr II), Reticulum II (Ret II), Phoenix II (Phe II), and Tucana III (Tuc III). Our photometry reaches ~3 magnitudes deeper than the discovery data, providing improved determinations of the properties of these new objects (e.g., distance, structural properties, luminosity measurements, and signs of tidal disturbance). The satellite color-magnitude diagrams show that they are all old (~13.5 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]$\lesssim-2.2$). Sgr II is particularly interesting as it sits in an intermediate position between the loci of dwarf galaxies and globular clusters in the size-luminosity plane. The ensemble of its structural parameters is more consistent with a globular cluster classification, indicating that Sgr II is the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range. The other three satellites land directly on the locus defined by Milky Way ultra-faint dwarf galaxies of similar luminosity. Ret II is the most elongated nearby dwarf galaxy currently known for its luminosity range. Our structural parameters for Phe II and Tuc III suggest that they are both dwarf galaxies. Tuc III is known to be associated with a stellar stream, which is clearly visible in our matched-filter stellar density map. The other satellites do not show any clear evidence of tidal stripping in the form of extensions or distortions. Finally, we also use archival HI data to place limits on the gas content of each object.
  • We present optical continuum lags for two Seyfert 1 galaxies, MCG+08-11-011 and NGC 2617, using monitoring data from a reverberation mapping campaign carried out in 2014. Our light curves span the ugriz filters over four months, with median cadences of 1.0 and 0.6 days for MCG+08-11-011 and NGC\,2617, respectively, combined with roughly daily X-ray and near-UV data from Swift for NGC 2617. We find lags consistent with geometrically thin accretion-disk models that predict a lag-wavelength relation of $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$. However, the observed lags are larger than predictions based on standard thin-disk theory by factors of 3.3 for MCG+08-11-011 and 2.3 for NGC\,2617. These differences can be explained if the mass accretion rates are larger than inferred from the optical luminosity by a factor of 4.3 in MCG+08-11-011 and a factor of 1.3 in NGC\,2617, although uncertainty in the SMBH masses determines the significance of this result. While the X-ray variability in NGC\,2617 precedes the UV/optical variability, the long 2.6 day lag is problematic for coronal reprocessing models.
  • Binary neutron star mergers are important to understand stellar evolution, the chemical enrichment of the universe via the r-process, the physics of short gamma-ray bursts, gravitational waves and pulsars. The rates at which these coalescences happen is uncertain, but it can be constrained in different ways. One of those is to search for the optical transients produced at the moment of the merging, called a kilonova, in ongoing SN searches. However, until now, only theoretical models for kilonovae light curve were available to estimate their rates. The recent kilonova discovery AT~2017gfo/DLT17ck gives us the opportunity to constrain the rate of kilonovae using the light curve of a real event. We constrain the rate of binary neutron star mergers using the DLT40 Supernova search, and the native AT~2017gfo/DLT17ck light curve obtained with the same telescope and software system. Excluding AT~2017gfo/DLT17ck due to visibility issues, which was only discovered thanks to the aLIGO/aVirgo trigger, no other similar transients detected during 13 months of daily cadence observations of $\sim$ 2200 nearby ($<$40 Mpc) galaxies. We find that the rate of BNS mergers is lower than 0.47 - 0.55 kilonovae per 100 years per $10^{10}$ $L_{B_{\odot}}$ (depending on the adopted extinction distribution). In volume, this translates to $<0.99\times 10^{-4}\,_{-0.15}^{+0.19},\rm{Mpc^{-3}}\,\rm{yr^{-1}}$(SNe Ia-like extinction distribution), consistent with previous BNS coalescence rates. Based on our rate limit, and the sensitivity of aLIGO/aVirgo during O2, it is very unlikely that kilonova events are lurking in old pointed galaxy SN search datasets.
  • We investigate the hypothesized tidal disruption of the Hercules ultra-faint dwarf galaxy (UFD). Previous tidal disruption studies of the Hercules UFD have been hindered by the high degree of foreground contamination in the direction of the dwarf. We bypass this issue by using RR Lyrae stars, which are standard candles with a very low field-volume density at the distance of Hercules. We use wide-field imaging from the Dark Energy Camera on CTIO to identify candidate RR Lyrae stars, supplemented with observations taken in coordination with the Beijing-Arizona Sky Survey on the Bok Telescope. Combining color, magnitude, and light-curve information, we identify three new RR Lyrae stars associated with Hercules. All three of these new RR Lyrae stars lie outside its published tidal radius. When considered with the nine RR Lyrae stars already known within the tidal radius, these results suggest that a substantial fraction of Hercules' stellar content has been stripped. With this degree of tidal disruption, Hercules is an interesting case between a visibly disrupted dwarf (such as the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy) and one in dynamic equilibrium. The degree of disruption also shows that we must be more careful with the ways we determine object membership when estimating dwarf masses in the future. One of the three discovered RR Lyrae stars sits along the minor axis of Hercules, but over two tidal radii away. This type of debris is consistent with recent models that suggest Hercules' orbit is aligned with its minor axis.
  • We present new Chandra observations of the outer halo of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4472 (M49) in the Virgo Cluster. The data extend to 130 kpc (28'), and have a combined exposure time of 150 ks. After identifying optical counterparts using the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey to remove background active galactic nuclei and globular cluster (GC) sources, and correcting for completeness, we find that the number of field low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) per unit stellar V-band light increases significantly with galactocentric radius. Because the flux limit of the complete sample corresponds to the Eddington limit for neutron stars in NGC 4472, many of the ~90 field LMXBs in this sample could host black holes. The excess of field LMXBs at large galactocentric radii may be partially caused by natal kicks on black holes and neutron stars in binary systems in the inner part of the galaxy. Furthermore, since the metallicity in the halo of NGC 4472 strongly decreases towards larger galactocentric radii, the number of field LMXBs per unit stellar mass is anti-correlated with metallicity, opposite to what is observed in GCs. Another way to explain the spatial distribution of field LMXBs is therefore a reversed metallicity effect, although we have not identified a mechanism to explain this in terms of stellar and binary evolution.
  • We present deep, wide-field Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam photometry of two recently discovered satellites of the Milky Way (MW): Columba I and Triangulum II. The color magnitude diagrams of both objects point to exclusively old and metal-poor stellar populations. We re-derive structural parameters and luminosities of these satellites, and find $M_{\rm V, Col~I} = -4.2\pm0.2$ for Col I and $M_{\rm V, Tri~II} = -1.2\pm0.4$ for Tri II, with corresponding half-light radii of $r_{\rm h, Col~I} = 117\pm17$ pc and $r_{\rm h, Tri~II} = 21\pm4$ pc. The properties of both systems are consistent with observed scaling relations for MW dwarf galaxies. Based on archival data, we derive upper limits on the neutral gas content of these dwarfs, and find that they lack HI, as do the majority of observed satellites within the MW virial radius. Neither satellite shows evidence of tidal stripping in the form of extensions or distortions in matched-filter stellar density maps or surface density profiles. However, the smaller Tri II system is relatively metal-rich for its luminosity (compared to other MW satellites), possibly because it has been tidally stripped. Through a suite of orbit simulations, we show that Tri II is approaching pericenter of its eccentric orbit, a stage at which tidal debris is unlikely to be seen. In addition, we find that Tri II may be on its first infall into the MW, which helps explain its unique properties among MW dwarfs. Further evidence that Tri II is likely an ultra-faint dwarf comes from its stellar mass function, which is similar to those of other MW dwarfs.
  • We present late-time spectra of eight Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained at $>200$ days after peak brightness using the Gemini South and Keck telescopes. All of the SNe Ia in our sample were nearby, well separated from their host galaxy's light, and have early-time photometry and spectroscopy from the Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO). Parameters are derived from the light curves and spectra such as peak brightness, decline rate, photospheric velocity, and the widths and velocities of the forbidden nebular emission lines. We discuss the physical interpretations of these parameters for the individual SNe Ia and the sample in general, including comparisons to well-observed SNe Ia from the literature. There are possible correlations between early-time and late-time spectral features that may indicate an asymmetric explosion, so we discuss our sample of SNe within the context of models for an offset ignition and/or white dwarf collisions. A subset of our late-time spectra are uncontaminated by host emission, and we statistically evaluate our nondetections of H$\alpha$ emission to limit the amount of hydrogen in these systems. Finally, we consider the late-time evolution of the iron emission lines, finding that not all of our SNe follow the established trend of a redward migration at $>200$ days after maximum brightness.
  • We present very early, high-cadence photometric observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2017cbv. The light curve is unique in that it has a blue bump during the first five days of observations in the U, B, and g bands, which is clearly resolved given our photometric cadence of 5.7 hr during that time span. We model the light curve as the combination of early shocking of the supernova ejecta against a nondegenerate companion star plus a standard SN Ia component. Our best-fit model suggests the presence of a subgiant star 56 solar radii from the exploding white dwarf, although this number is highly model-dependent. While this model matches the optical light curve well, it overpredicts the observed flux in the ultraviolet bands. This may indicate that the shock is not a blackbody, perhaps because of line blanketing in the UV. Alternatively, it could point to another physical explanation for the optical blue bump, such as interaction with circumstellar material or an unusual nickel distribution. Early optical spectra of SN 2017cbv show strong carbon absorption up through day -13 with respect to maximum light, suggesting that the progenitor system contains a significant amount of unburned material. These early results on SN 2017cbv illustrate the power of early discovery and intense follow-up of nearby supernovae to resolve standing questions about the progenitor systems and explosion mechanisms of SNe Ia.
  • Observations of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies can be used to study a variety of topics, including the structure of dark matter halos and the history of vigorous star formation in low-mass galaxies. We report on the properties of the faint globular cluster (M_V ~ -3.4) in the M31 dwarf galaxy Andromeda I. This object adds to the growing population of low-luminosity Local Group galaxies that host single globular clusters.
  • Many Type IIb supernovae (SNe) show a prominent additional early peak in their light curves, which is generally thought to be due to the shock cooling of extended hydrogen-rich material surrounding the helium core of the exploding star. The recent SN 2016gkg was a nearby Type IIb SN discovered shortly after explosion, which makes it an excellent candidate for studying this first peak. We numerically explode a large grid of extended envelope models and compare these to SN 2016gkg to investigate what constraints can be derived from its light curve. This includes exploring density profiles for both a convective envelope and an optically thick steady-state wind, the latter of which has not typically been considered for Type IIb SNe models. We find that roughly $\sim0.02\,M_\odot$ of extended material with a radius of $\approx180-260\,R_\odot$ reproduces the photometric light curve data, consistent with pre-explosion imaging. These values are independent of the assumed density profile of this material, although a convective profile provides a somewhat better fit. We infer from our modeling that the explosion must have occurred within $\approx2-3\,{\rm hrs}$ of the first observed data point, demonstrating that this event was caught very close to the moment of explosion. Nevertheless, our best-fitting one-dimensional models overpredict the earliest velocity measurements, which suggests that the hydrogen-rich material is not distributed in a spherically symmetric manner. We compare this to the asymmetries seen in the SN IIb remnant Cas A, and we discuss the implications of this for Type IIb SN progenitors and explosion models.
  • We present results from WIYN pODI imaging of Lacerta I (And XXXI), a satellite dwarf galaxy discovered in the outskirts of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) in Pan-STARRS1 survey data. Our deep, wide-field $g,i$ photometry reaches $\sim$3 magnitudes fainter than the photometry in the Pan-STARRS1 discovery paper and allows us to trace the stellar population of Lac I beyond two half-light radii from the galaxy center. We measure a Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) distance for Lac I of $(m-M)_0=24.44\pm0.11$ mag (773$\pm$40 kpc, or 264$\pm$6 kpc from M31), which is consistent with the Pan-STARRS1 distance. We use a maximum-likelihood technique to derive structural properties for the galaxy, and find a half-light radius ($r_h$) of 3.24$\pm$0.21 arcmin (728$\pm$47 pc), ellipticity ($\epsilon$) of 0.44$\pm$0.03, total magnitude $M_V$ $=$ $-$11.4$\pm$0.3, and central surface brightness $\mu_{V,0}$ $=$ 24.8$\pm$0.3 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. We find no HI emission in archival data and set a limit on Lac I's neutral gas mass-to-light ratio of $M_{HI}/L_V$ $<$ 0.06 $M_{sun}$/$L_{sun}$, confirming Lac I as a gas-poor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Photometric metallicities derived from Red Giant Branch stars within 2 $r_h$ yield a median [Fe/H] of $-$1.68$\pm$0.03, which is more metal-rich than the spectroscopically-derived value from Martin et al. (2014). Combining our measured magnitude with this higher metallicity estimate places Lac I closer to its expected position on the luminosity-metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies.
  • SN 2016gkg is a nearby Type IIb supernova discovered shortly after explosion. Like several other Type IIb events with early-time data, SN 2016gkg displays a double-peaked light curve, with the first peak associated with the cooling of a low-mass extended progenitor envelope. We present unprecedented intranight-cadence multi-band photometric coverage of the first light-curve peak of SN 2016gkg obtained from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network, the Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System, the Swift satellite and various amateur-operated telescopes. Fitting these data to analytical shock-cooling models gives a progenitor radius of ~25-140 solar radii with ~2-30 x 10^-2 solar masses of material in the extended envelope (depending on the model and the assumed host-galaxy extinction). Our radius estimates are broadly consistent with values derived independently (in other works) from HST imaging of the progenitor star. However, the shock-cooling model radii are on the lower end of the values indicated by pre-explosion imaging. Hydrodynamical simulations could refine the progenitor parameters deduced from the shock-cooling emission and test the analytical models.
  • We present a chemodynamical analysis of the Leo~V dwarf galaxy, based on Keck II DEIMOS spectra of 8 member stars. We find a systemic velocity for the system of $\langle v_r\rangle = 170.9^{+ 2.1}_{-1.9}$kms$^{-1}$, and barely resolve a velocity dispersion for the system, with $\sigma_{vr} = 2.3^{+3.2}_{-1.6}$kms$^{-1}$, consistent with previous studies of Leo~V. The poorly resolved dispersion means we are unable to adequately constrain the dark matter content of Leo~V. We find an average metallicity for the dwarf of [Fe/H]$ = -2.48\pm0.21$, and measure a significant spread in the iron abundance of its member stars, with $-3.1\le$[Fe/H]$\le-1.9$ dex, which cleanly identifies Leo~V as a dwarf galaxy that has been able to self-enrich its stellar population through extended star formation. Owing to the tentative photometric evidence for tidal substructure around Leo~V, we also investigate whether there is any evidence for tidal stripping or shocking of the system within its dynamics. We measure a significant velocity gradient across the system, of $\frac{{\rm d}v}{{\rm d}\chi} = -4.1^{+2.8}_{-2.6}$kms$^{-1}$ per arcmin (or $\frac{{\rm d}v}{{\rm d}\chi} = -71.9^{+50.8}_{-45.6}$kms$^{-1}$~kpc$^{-1}$), which points almost directly toward the Galactic centre. We argue that Leo~V is likely a dwarf on the brink of dissolution, having just barely survived a past encounter with the centre of the Milky Way.
  • We present the first results from an optical reverberation mapping campaign executed in 2014, targeting the active galactic nuclei (AGN) MCG+08-11-011, NGC 2617, NGC 4051, 3C 382, and Mrk 374. Our targets have diverse and interesting observational properties, including a "changing look" AGN and a broad-line radio galaxy. Based on continuum-H$\beta$ lags, we measure black hole masses for all five targets. We also obtain H$\gamma$ and He{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 4686$ lags for all objects except 3C 382. The He{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 4686$ lags indicate radial stratification of the BLR, and the masses derived from different emission lines are in general agreement. The relative responsivities of these lines are also in qualitative agreement with photoionization models. These spectra have extremely high signal-to-noise ratios (100--300 per pixel) and there are excellent prospects for obtaining velocity-resolved reverberation signatures.
  • We report the discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of an LMC stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group, based on deep imaging with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. MADCASH J074238+652501-dw lies $\sim$35 kpc in projection from NGC 2403, a dwarf spiral galaxy at $D$$\approx$3.2 Mpc. This new dwarf has $M_{g} = -7.4\pm0.4$ and a half-light radius of $168\pm70$ pc, at the calculated distance of $3.39\pm0.41$ Mpc. The color-magnitude diagram reveals no evidence of young stellar populations, suggesting that MADCASH J074238+652501-dw is an old, metal-poor dwarf similar to low luminosity dwarfs in the Local Group. The lack of either detected HI gas ($M_{\rm HI}/L_{V} < 0.69 M_\odot/L_\odot$, based on Green Bank Telescope observations) or $GALEX$ NUV/FUV flux enhancement is consistent with a lack of young stars. This is the first result from the MADCASH (Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos) survey, which is conducting a census of the stellar substructure and faint satellites in the halos of Local Volume LMC analogs via resolved stellar populations. Models predict a total of $\sim$4-10 satellites at least as massive as MADCASH J074238+652501-dw around a host with the mass of NGC 2403, with 2-3 within our field of view, slightly more than the one such satellite observed in our footprint.
  • We report evidence for excess blue light from the Type Ia supernova SN 2012cg at fifteen and sixteen days before maximum B-band brightness. The emission is consistent with predictions for the impact of the supernova on a non-degenerate binary companion. This is the first evidence for emission from a companion to a SN Ia. Sixteen days before maximum light, the B-V color of SN 2012cg is 0.2 mag bluer than for other normal SN~Ia. At later times, this supernova has a typical SN Ia light curve, with extinction-corrected M_B = -19.62 +/- 0.02 mag and Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.86 +/- 0.02. Our data set is extensive, with photometry in 7 filters from 5 independent sources. Early spectra also show the effects of blue light, and high-velocity features are observed at early times. Near maximum, the spectra are normal with a silicon velocity v_{Si} = -10,500$ km s^{-1}. Comparing the early data with models by Kasen (2010) favors a main-sequence companion of about 6 solar masses. It is possible that many other SN Ia have main-sequence companions that have eluded detection because the emission from the impact is fleeting and faint.
  • We present deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging at the locations of four, potentially hostless, long-faded Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in low-redshift, rich galaxy clusters that were identified in the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey. Assuming a steep faint-end slope for the galaxy cluster luminosity function ($\alpha_d=-1.5$), our data includes all but $\lesssim0.2\%$ percent of the stellar mass in cluster galaxies ($\lesssim0.005\%$ with $\alpha_d=-1.0$), a factor of 10 better than our ground-based imaging. Two of the four SNe Ia still have no possible host galaxy associated with them ($M_R>-9.2$), confirming that their progenitors belong to the intracluster stellar population. The third SNe Ia appears near a faint disk galaxy ($M_V=-12.2$) which has a relatively high probability of being a chance alignment. A faint, red, point source coincident with the fourth SN Ia's explosion position ($M_V=-8.4$) may be either a globular cluster (GC) or faint dwarf galaxy. We estimate the local surface densities of GCs and dwarfs to show that a GC is more likely, due to the proximity of an elliptical galaxy, but neither can be ruled out. This faint host implies that the SN Ia rate in dwarfs or GCs may be enhanced, but remains within previous observational constraints. We demonstrate that our results do not preclude the use of SNe Ia as bright tracers of intracluster light at higher redshifts, but that it will be necessary to first refine the constraints on their rate in dwarfs and GCs with deep imaging for a larger sample of low-redshift, apparently hostless SNe Ia.
  • Torques acting on galaxies lead to physical alignments, but the resulting ellipticity correlations are difficult to predict. As they constitute a major contaminant for cosmic shear studies, it is important to constrain the intrinsic alignment signal observationally. We measured the alignments of satellite galaxies within 90 massive galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.05<z<0.55 and quantified their impact on the cosmic shear signal. We combined a sample of 38,104 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts with high-quality data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We used phase-space information to select 14,576 cluster members, 14,250 of which have shape measurements and measured three different types of alignment: the radial alignment of satellite galaxies toward the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), the common orientations of satellite galaxies and BCGs, and the radial alignments of satellites with each other. Residual systematic effects are much smaller than the statistical uncertainties. We detect no galaxy alignment of any kind out to at least 3 r200. The signal is consistent with zero for both blue and red galaxies, bright and faint ones, and also for subsamples of clusters based on redshift, dynamical mass, and dynamical state. These conclusions are unchanged if we expand the sample with bright cluster members from the red sequence. We augment our constraints with those from the literature to estimate the importance of the intrinsic alignments of satellites compared to those of central galaxies, for which the alignments are described by the linear alignment model. Comparison of the alignment signals to the expected uncertainties of current surveys such as the Kilo-Degree Survey suggests that the linear alignment model is an adequate treatment of intrinsic alignments, but it is not clear whether this will be the case for larger surveys.
  • KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3-m telescope from February to November of 2012, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the H-beta light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method, and found rest-frame lags of lag_CCF = 13.53 (+2.03, -2.32) days and lag_JAVELIN = 13.15 (+1.08, -1.00) days. The H-beta root-mean-square line profile has a width of sigma_line = 770 +/- 49 km/s. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M_BH = 8.06 (+1.59, -1.72) x 10^6 M_sun for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L_Edd ~ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.
  • We present the discovery and extensive early-time observations of the Type Ic supernova (SN) PTF12gzk. Our finely sampled light curves show a rise of 0.8mag within 2.5hr. Power-law fits [f(t)\sim(t-t_0)^n] to these data constrain the explosion date to within one day. We cannot rule out the expected quadratic fireball model, but higher values of n are possible as well for larger areas in the fit parameter space. Our bolometric light curve and a dense spectral sequence are used to estimate the physical parameters of the exploding star and of the explosion. We show that the photometric evolution of PTF12gzk is slower than that of most SNe Ic, and its high ejecta velocities (~30,000km/s four days after explosion) are closer to the observed velocities of broad-lined SNe Ic associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) than to the observed velocities in normal Type Ic SNe. The high velocities are sustained through the SN early evolution, and are similar to those of GRB-SNe when the SN reach peak magnitude. By comparison with the spectroscopically similar SN 2004aw, we suggest that the observed properties of PTF12gzk indicate an initial progenitor mass of 25-35 solar mass and a large (5-10E51 erg) kinetic energy, close to the regime of GRB-SN properties. The host-galaxy characteristics are consistent with GRB-SN hosts, and not with normal SN Ic hosts as well, yet this SN does not show the broad lines over extended periods of time that are typical of broad-line Type Ic SNe.
  • The prominent broad Fe II emission blends in the spectra of active galactic nuclei have been shown to vary in response to continuum variations, but past attempts to measure the reverberation lag time of the optical Fe II lines have met with only limited success. Here we report the detection of Fe II reverberation in two Seyfert 1 galaxies, NGC 4593 and Mrk 1511, based on data from a program carried out at Lick Observatory in Spring 2011. Light curves for emission lines including H-beta and Fe II were measured by applying a fitting routine to decompose the spectra into several continuum and emission-line components, and we use cross-correlation techniques to determine the reverberation lags of the emission lines relative to V-band light curves. In both cases the measured lag (t_cen) of Fe II is longer than that of H-beta, although the inferred lags are somewhat sensitive to the choice of Fe II template used in the fit. For spectral decompositions done using the Fe II template of Veron-Cetty et al. (2004), we find t_cen(Fe II)/t_cen(H-beta) = 1.9+-0.6 in NGC 4593 and 1.5+-0.3 in Mrk 1511. The detection of highly correlated variations between Fe II and continuum emission demonstrates that the Fe II emission in these galaxies originates in photoionized gas, located predominantly in the outer portion of the broad-line region.
  • Clusters of galaxies are excellent locations to probe the distribution of baryons and dark matter (DM) over a wide range of scales. We study a sample of seven massive, relaxed galaxy clusters with centrally-located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at z=0.2-0.3. Using the observational tools of strong and weak gravitational lensing, combined with resolved stellar kinematics within the BCG, we measure the total radial density profile, comprising both dark and baryonic matter, over scales of ~3-3000 kpc. Lensing-derived mass profiles typically agree with independent X-ray estimates within ~15%, suggesting that departures from hydrostatic equilibrium are small and that the clusters in our sample (except A383) are not strongly elongated along the line of sight. The inner logarithmic slope gamma_tot of the total density profile measured over r/r200=0.003-0.03, where rho_tot ~ r^(-gamma_tot), is found to be nearly universal, with a mean <gamma_tot> = 1.16 +- 0.05 (random) +0.05-0.07 (systematic) and an intrinsic scatter of < 0.13 (68% confidence). This is further supported by the very homogeneous shape of the observed velocity dispersion profiles, obtained via Keck spectroscopy, which are mutually consistent after a simple scaling. Remarkably, this slope agrees closely with numerical simulations that contain only dark matter, despite the significant contribution of stellar mass on the scales we probe. The Navarro-Frenk-White profile characteristic of collisionless cold dark matter is a better description of the total mass density at radii >~ 5-10 kpc than that of dark matter alone. Hydrodynamical simulations that include baryons, cooling, and feedback currently provide a poorer match. We discuss the significance of our findings for understanding the assembly of BCGs and cluster cores, particularly the influence of baryons on the inner DM halo. [abridged]
  • We present stellar and dark matter (DM) density profiles for a sample of seven massive, relaxed galaxy clusters derived from strong and weak gravitational lensing and resolved stellar kinematic observations within the centrally-located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). In Paper I of the series, we demonstrated that the total density profile derived from these data, which span 3 decades in radius, is consistent with numerical DM-only simulations at radii >~ 5-10 kpc, despite the significant contribution of stellar material in the core. Here we decompose the inner mass profiles of these clusters into stellar and dark components. Parametrizing the DM density profile as a power law rho_DM ~ r^{-\beta} on small scales, we find a mean slope <\beta> = 0.50 +- 0.10 (random) +0.14-0.13 (systematic). Alternatively, cored Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles with <log r_core/kpc> = 1.14 +- 0.13 (random) +0.14-0.22 (systematic) provide an equally good description. These density profiles are significantly shallower than canonical NFW models at radii <~ 30 kpc, comparable to the effective radii of the BCGs. The inner DM profile is correlated with the distribution of stars in the BCG, suggesting a connection between the inner halo and the assembly of stars in the central galaxy. The stellar mass-to-light ratio inferred from lensing and stellar dynamics is consistent with that inferred using stellar population synthesis models if a Salpeter initial mass function is adopted. We compare these results to theories describing the interaction between baryons and DM in cluster cores, including adiabatic contraction models and the possible effects of galaxy mergers and active galactic nucleus feedback, and evaluate possible signatures of alternative DM candidates.
  • Bright gravitationally lensed galaxies provide our most detailed view of galaxies at high redshift. Yet as a result of the small number of ultra-bright z~2 lensed systems with confirmed redshifts, most detailed spectroscopic studies have been limited in their scope. With the goal of increasing the number of bright lensed galaxies available for detailed follow-up, we have undertaken a spectroscopic campaign targeting wide separation (>3 arcsec) galaxy-galaxy lens candidates within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Building on the earlier efforts of our CASSOWARY survey, we target a large sample of candidate galaxy-galaxy lens systems in SDSS using a well-established search algorithm which identifies blue arc-like structures situated around luminous red galaxies. In this paper, we present a new redshift catalog containing 25 lensed sources in SDSS confirmed through spectroscopic follow-up of candidate galaxy-galaxy lens systems. Included in this new sample are two of the brightest galaxies (r=19.6 and 19.7) galaxies known at z~2, a low metallicity (12 + log (O/H)~8.0) extreme nebular line emitting galaxy at z=1.43, and numerous systems for which detailed follow-up will be possible. The source redshifts span 0.9<z<2.5 (median redshift of 1.9), and their optical magnitudes are in the range 19.6<r<22.3. We present a brief source-by-source discussion of the spectroscopic properties extracted from our confirmatory spectra and discuss some initial science results. With more than 50 gravitationally lensed z>1 galaxies now confirmed within SDSS, it will soon be possible for the first time to develop generalized conclusions from detailed spectroscopic studies of the brightest lensed systems at high redshift.
  • In a sample of 54 galaxy clusters (0.04<z<0.15) containing 3551 early-type galaxies suitable for study, we identify those with tidal features both interactively and automatically. We find that ~3% have tidal features that can be detected with data that reaches a 3-sigma sensitivity limit of 26.5 mag arcsec^-2. Regardless of the method used to classify tidal features, or the fidelity imposed on such classifications, we find a deficit of tidally disturbed galaxies with decreasing clustercentric radius that is most pronounced inside of ~0.5R_200. We cannot distinguish whether the trend arises from an increasing likelihood of recent mergers with increasing clustercentric radius or a decrease in the lifetime of tidal features with decreasing clustercentric radius. We find no evidence for a relationship between local density and the incidence of tidal features, but our local density measure has large uncertainties. We find interesting behavior in the rate of tidal features among cluster early-types as a function of clustercentric radius and expect such results to provide constraints on the effect of the cluster environment on the structure of galaxy halos, the build-up of the red sequence of galaxies, and the origin of the intracluster stellar population.