• We performed very deep searches for 2 ground-state water transitions in 13 protoplanetary disks with the HIFI instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory, with integration times up to 12 hours per line. Two other water transitions that sample warmer gas were also searched for with shallower integrations. The detection rate is low, and the upper limits provided by the observations are generally much lower than predictions of thermo-chemical models with canonical inputs. One ground-state transition is newly detected in the stacked spectrum of AA Tau, DM Tau, LkCa 15, and MWC 480. We run a grid of models to show that the abundance of gas-phase oxygen needs to be reduced by a factor of at least ~100 to be consistent with the observational upper limits (and positive detections) if a dust-to-gas mass ratio of 0.01 were to be assumed. As a continuation of previous ideas, we propose that the underlying reason for the depletion of oxygen (hence the low detection rate) is the freeze-out of volatiles such as water and CO onto dust grains followed by grain growth and settling/migration, which permanently removes these gas-phase molecules from the emissive upper layers of the outer disk. Such depletion of volatiles is likely ubiquitous among different disks, though not necessarily to the same degree. The volatiles might be returned back to the gas phase in the inner disk (within about 15 AU), which is consistent with current constraints. Comparison with studies on disk dispersal due to photoevaporation indicates that the timescale for volatile depletion is shorter than that of photoevaporation.
  • We report the results of a sensitive search for the 443.952902 GHz $J=1-0$ transition of the LiH molecule toward two interstellar clouds in the Milky Way, W49N and Sgr B2 (Main), that has been carried out using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope. The results obtained toward W49N place an upper limit of $1.9 \times 10^{-11}\, (3\sigma)$ on the LiH abundance, $N({\rm LiH})/N({\rm H}_2)$, in a foreground, diffuse molecular cloud along the sight-line to W49N, corresponding to 0.5% of the solar system lithium abundance. Those obtained toward Sgr B2 (Main) place an abundance limit $N({\rm LiH})/N({\rm H}_2) < 3.6 \times 10^{-13} \,(3\sigma)$ in the dense gas within the Sgr B2 cloud itself. These limits are considerably smaller that those implied by the tentative detection of LiH reported previously for the $z=0.685$ absorber toward B0218+357.
  • SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
  • We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C-shock through a clump with preshock density 2e4/cm3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O$_2$ can explain the emission from the source if its line of sight dimension is ~10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O$_2$ emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.
  • Hydrogen fluoride has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J=1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H2 of 1.5e-8 in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC6334 I, we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5e-10. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freeze out of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant 3.6e-8) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freeze out onto gas grains.
  • The chemical composition of the interstellar medium is determined by gas phase chemistry, assisted by grain surface reactions, and by shock chemistry. The aim of this study is to measure the abundance of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in diffuse spiral arm clouds as a contribution to our understanding of the underlying network of chemical reactions. Owing to their high critical density, the ground states of light hydrides provide a tool to directly estimate column densities by means of absorption spectroscopy against bright background sources. We observed onboard the SOFIA observatory the 2Pi3/2, J = 5/2 3/2 2.5 THz line of ground-state OH in the diffuse clouds of the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm. OH column densities in the spiral arm clouds along the sightlines to W49N, W51 and G34.26+0.15 were found to be of the order of 10^14 cm^-2, which corresponds to a fractional abundance of 10^-7 to 10^-8, which is comparable to that of H_2O. The absorption spectra of both species have similar velocity components, and the ratio of the derived H_2O to OH column densities ranges from 0.3 to 1.0. In W49N we also detected the corresponding line of ^18OH.
  • We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5\times1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19"), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is 0.3 - 7.3\times10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~ 5" diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~ 10 M\odot and the dust temperature is \geq 150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T \geq 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature \geq 180 K. The inferred O2 column density \simeq 5\times1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) \simeq 4\times1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10 to 15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2.
  • Photometric maps, obtained with Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), can provide a valuable probe of warm molecular hydrogen within the interstellar medium. IRAC maps of the supernova remnant IC443, extracted from the Spitzer archive, are strikingly similar to spectral line maps of the H2 pure rotational transitions that we obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument on Spitzer. IRS spectroscopy indicates that IRAC Bands 3 and 4 are indeed dominated by the H2 v=0-0 S(5) and S(7) transitions, respectively. Modeling of the H2 excitation suggests that Bands 1 and 2 are dominated by H2 v=1-0 O(5) and v=0-0 S(9). Large maps of the H2 emission in IC433, obtained with IRAC, show band ratios that are inconsistent with the presence of gas at a single temperature. The relative strengths of IRAC Bands 2, 3, and 4 are consistent with pure H2 emission from shocked material with a power-law distribution of gas temperatures. CO vibrational emissions do not contribute significantly to the observed Band 2 intensity. Assuming that the column density of H2 at temperatures T to T+dT is proportional to T raised to the power -b for temperatures up to 4000 K, we obtained a typical estimate of 4.5 for b. The power-law index, b, shows variations over the range 3 to 6 within the set of different sight-lines probed by the maps, with the majority of sight-lines showing b in the range 4 to 5. The observed power-law index is consistent with the predictions of simple models for paraboloidal bow shocks.
  • By providing sensitive sub-arcsecond images and integral field spectroscopy in the 25 - 400 micron wavelength range, a far-IR interferometer will revolutionize our understanding of planetary system formation, reveal otherwise-undetectable planets through the disk perturbations they induce, and spectroscopically probe the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets in orbits typical of most of the planets in our solar system. The technical challenges associated with interferometry in the far-IR are greatly relaxed relative to those encountered at shorter wavelengths or when starlight nulling is required. A structurally connected far-IR interferometer with a maximum baseline length of 36 m can resolve the interesting spatial structures in nascent and developed exoplanetary systems and measure exozodiacal emission at a sensitivity level critical to TPF-I mission planning. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope was recommended in the Community Plan for Far-IR/Submillimeter Space Astronomy, studied as a Probe-class mission, and estimated to cost 800M dollars. The scientific communities in Europe, Japan, and Canada have also demonstrated a keen interest in far-IR interferometry through mission planning workshops and technology research, suggesting the possibility of an international collaborative effort.
  • A major goal of modern astrophysics is to understand the processes by which the universe evolved from its initial simplicity, as seen in measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background, to the universe we see today, with complexity on all scales. While the diffuse background measurements of COBE reveal the importance of the far infrared and submillimeter in early galaxy and star formation, the understanding of the development of complex structure requires high resolution imaging and spectroscopy. We present a concept for a space mission called SPECS, the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, which provides these capabilities. SPECS is a cold, spatial and spectral Michelson interferometer with adjustable baselines ranging up to 1 km. It has Hubble sensitivity and angular resolution in the far IR and submillimeter, spectral resolution up to 10,000, and a 14' field of view. SPECS will be able to image thermal dust continuum and infrared cooling and diagnostic line emission over a wide range of redshifts, providing extinction-free astrophysical probes of young galaxies and early cosmic structures, and measures of the luminosity and heavy element formation history of the universe. SPECS would also have the potential to improve vastly our knowledge of protostars, protoplanetary systems, Active Galactic Nuclei and other objects in the local universe. We recommend that a concerted effort be made during the next decade to develop and test certain critical technologies (photon-counting far IR detectors, formation flying spacecraft, cold, lightweight mirrors, and active coolers), so that SPECS can be deployed in about 2015.