• Although core helium-burning red clump (RC) stars are faint at ultraviolet wavelengths, their ultraviolet-optical color is a unique and accessible probe of their physical properties. Using data from the GALEX All Sky Imaging Survey, Gaia Data Release 2 and the SDSS APOGEE DR14 survey, we find that spectroscopic metallicity is strongly correlated with the location of an RC star in the UV-optical color magnitude diagram. The RC has a wide spread in (NUV - G)$_0$ color, over 4 magnitudes, compared to a 0.7-magnitude range in (G$_{BP}$ - G$_{RP}$)$_0$. We propose a photometric, dust-corrected, ultraviolet-optical (NUV - G)$_0$ color-metallicity [Fe/H] relation using a sample of 5,175 RC stars from APOGEE. We show that this relation has a scatter of 0.28 dex and is easier to obtain for large, wide-field samples than spectroscopic metallicities. Importantly, the effect may be comparable to the spread in RC color attributed to extinction in other studies.
  • A common approach for Bayesian computation with big data is to partition the data into smaller pieces, perform local inference for each piece separately, and finally combine the results to obtain an approximation to the global posterior. Looking at this from the bottom up, one can perform separate analyses on individual sources of data and then combine these in a larger Bayesian model. In either case, the idea of distributed modeling and inference has both conceptual and computational appeal, but from the Bayesian perspective there is no general way of handling the prior distribution: if the prior is included in each separate inference, it will be multiply-counted when the inferences are combined; but if the prior is itself divided into pieces, it may not provide enough regularization for each separate computation, thus eliminating one of the key advantages of Bayesian methods. To resolve this dilemma, we propose expectation propagation (EP) as a general prototype for distributed Bayesian inference. The central idea is to factor the likelihood according to the data partitions, and to iteratively combine each factor with an approximate model of the prior and all other parts of the data, thus producing an overall approximation to the global posterior at convergence. In this paper, we give an introduction to EP and an overview of some recent developments of the method, with particular emphasis on its use in combining inferences from partitioned data. In addition to distributed modeling of large datasets, our unified treatment also includes hierarchical modeling of data with a naturally partitioned structure. The paper describes a general algorithmic framework, rather than a specific algorithm, and presents an example implementation for it.
  • We present the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (xGASS), a gas fraction-limited census of the atomic (HI) gas content of 1179 galaxies selected only by stellar mass ($M_\star =10^{9}-10^{11.5} M_\odot$) and redshift ($0.01<z<0.05$). This includes new Arecibo observations of 208 galaxies, for which we release catalogs and HI spectra. In addition to extending the GASS HI scaling relations by one decade in stellar mass, we quantify total (atomic+molecular) cold gas fractions and molecular-to-atomic gas mass ratios, $R_{mol}$, for the subset of 477 galaxies observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that atomic gas fractions keep increasing with decreasing stellar mass, with no sign of a plateau down to $\log M_\star/M_\odot = 9$. Total gas reservoirs remain HI-dominated across our full stellar mass range, hence total gas fraction scaling relations closely resemble atomic ones, but with a scatter that strongly correlates with $R_{mol}$, especially at fixed specific star formation rate. On average, $R_{mol}$ weakly increases with stellar mass and stellar surface density $\mu_\star$, but individual values vary by almost two orders of magnitude at fixed $M_\star$ or $\mu_\star$. We show that, for galaxies on the star-forming sequence, variations of $R_{mol}$ are mostly driven by changes of the HI reservoirs, with a clear dependence on $\mu_\star$. Establishing if galaxy mass or structure plays the most important role in regulating the cold gas content of galaxies requires an accurate separation of bulge and disk components for the study of gas scaling relations.
  • We introduce xCOLD GASS, a legacy survey providing a census of molecular gas in the local Universe. Building upon the original COLD GASS survey, we present here the full sample of 532 galaxies with CO(1-0) measurements from the IRAM-30m telescope. The sample is mass-selected in the redshift interval $0.01<z<0.05$ from SDSS, and therefore representative of the local galaxy population with M$_{\ast}>10^9$M$_{\odot}$. The CO(1-0) flux measurements are complemented by observations of the CO(2-1) line with both the IRAM-30m and APEX telescopes, HI observations from Arecibo, and photometry from SDSS, WISE and GALEX. Combining the IRAM and APEX data, we find that the CO(2-1) to CO(1-0) luminosity ratio for integrated measurements is $r_{21}=0.79\pm0.03$, with no systematic variations across the sample. The CO(1-0) luminosity function is constructed and best fit with a Schechter function with parameters {$L_{\mathrm{CO}}^* = (7.77\pm2.11) \times 10^9\,\mathrm{K\,km\,s^{-1}\, pc^{2}}$, $\phi^{*} = (9.84\pm5.41) \times 10^{-4} \, \mathrm{Mpc^{-3}}$ and $\alpha = -1.19\pm0.05$}. With the sample now complete down to stellar masses of $10^9$M$_{\odot}$, we are able to extend our study of gas scaling relations and confirm that both molecular gas fraction and depletion timescale vary with specific star formation rate (or offset from the star-formation main sequence) much more strongly than they depend on stellar mass. Comparing the xCOLD GASS results with outputs from hydrodynamic and semi-analytic models, we highlight the constraining power of cold gas scaling relations on models of galaxy formation.
  • We report on observations made with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) using background QSOs to probe the circum-galactic medium (CGM) around 17 low-redshift galaxies that are undergoing or have recently undergone a strong starburst (the COS-Burst program). The sightlines extend out to roughly the virial radius of the galaxy halo. We construct control samples of normal star-forming low-redshift galaxies from the COS/HST archive that match the starbursts in terms of galaxy stellar mass and impact parameter. We find clear evidence that the CGM around the starbursts differs systematically compared to the control galaxies. The Ly$\alpha$, Si III, C IV, and possibly O VI absorption-lines are stronger as a function of impact parameter, and the ratios of the equivalent widths of C IV/Ly$\alpha$ and Si III/Ly$\alpha$ are both larger than in normal star-forming galaxies. We also find that the widths and the velocity offsets (relative to $v_{sys}$) of the Ly$\alpha$ absorption-lines are significantly larger in the CGM of the starbursts, implying velocities of the absorbing material that are roughly twice the halo virial velocity. We show that these properties can be understood as a consequence of the interaction between a starburst-driven wind and the pre-existing CGM. These results underscore the importance of winds driven from intensely star-forming galaxies in helping drive the evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium. They also offer a new probe of the properties of starburst-driven winds and of the CGM itself.
  • We introduce a new methodology for the direct extraction of galaxy physical parameters from multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy. We use semi-analytic models that describe galaxy evolution in the context of large scale cosmological simulation to provide a catalog of galaxies, star formation histories, and physical parameters. We then apply stellar population synthesis models and a simple extinction model to calculate the observable broad-band fluxes and spectral indices for these galaxies. We use a linear regression analysis to relate physical parameters to observed colors and spectral indices. The result is a set of coefficients that can be used to translate observed colors and indices into stellar mass, star formation rate, and many other parameters, including the instantaneous time derivative of the star formation rate which we denote the {\it Star Formation Acceleration (SFA)}, We apply the method to a test sample of galaxies with GALEX photometry and SDSS spectroscopy, deriving relationships between stellar mass, specific star formation rate, and star formation acceleration. We find evidence for a mass-dependent SFA in the green valley, with low mass galaxies showing greater quenching and higher mass galaxies greater bursting. We also find evidence for an increase in average quenching in galaxies hosting AGN. A simple scenario in which lower mass galaxies accrete and become satellite galaxies, having their star forming gas tidally and/or ram-pressure stripped, while higher mass galaxies receive this gas and react with new star formation can qualitatively explain our results.
  • A number of exciting concepts are under development for Flagship, Probe class, Explorer class, and Suborbital class NASA missions in the ultraviolet/optical spectral ranges. These missions will depend on high performance silicon detector arrays being delivered affordably and in high numbers. In a focused effort we have advanced delta-doping technology to high throughput and high yield wafer-scale processing, encompassing a multitude of state-of-the-art silicon-based detector formats and designs. As part of this technology advancement and in preparation for upcoming missions, we have embarked on a number of field observations, instrument integrations, and independent evaluations of delta-doped arrays. In this paper, we present recent data and innovations from the Advanced Detectors and Systems program at JPL, including two-dimensional doping technology; our end-to-end post-fabrication processing of high performance UV/Optical/NIR arrays; and advanced coatings for detectors and optical elements. Additionally, we present examples of past, in-progress, and planned observations and deployments of delta-doped arrays.
  • We report on multilayer high efficiency antireflection coating (ARC) design and development for use at UV wavelengths on CCDs and other Si-based detectors. We have previously demonstrated a set of single-layer coatings, which achieve >50% quantum efficiency (QE) in four bands from 130 to 300 nm. We now present multilayer coating designs that significantly outperform our previous work between 195 and 215 nm. Using up to 11 layers, we present several model designs to reach QE above 80%. We also demonstrate the successful performance of 5 and 11 layer ARCs on silicon and fused silica substrates. Finally, we present a five-layer coat- ing deposited onto a thinned, delta-doped CCD and demonstrate external QE greater than 60% between 202 and 208 nm, with a peak of 67.6% at 206 nm.
  • We use the combined data from the COS-GASS and COS-Halos surveys to characterize the Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM) surrounding typical low-redshift galaxies in the mass range $\rm~M_*\sim~10^{9.5-11.5}~M_{\odot} $, and over a range of impact parameters extending to just beyond the halo virial radius ($\rm~R_{vir}$). We find the radial scale length of the distributions of the equivalent widths of the Lyman~$\alpha$ and Si III absorbers to be 0.9 and 0.4 $\rm~R_{vir}$, respectively. The radial distribution of equivalent widths is relatively uniform for the blue galaxies, but highly patchy (low covering fraction) for the red galaxies. We also find that the Lyman~$\alpha$ and Si III equivalent widths show significant positive correlations with the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) of the galaxy. We find a surprising lack of correlations between the halo mass (virial velocity) and either the velocity dispersions or velocity offsets of the Lyman~$\alpha$ lines. The ratio of the velocity offset to the velocity dispersion for the Lyman~$\alpha$ absorbers has a mean value of $\sim$ 4, suggesting that a given the line-of-sight is intersecting a dynamically coherent structure in the CGM rather than a sea of orbiting clouds. The kinematic properties of the CGM are similar in the blue and red galaxies, although we find that a significantly larger fraction of the blue galaxies have large Lyman~$\alpha$ velocity offsets (>200 km s$^{-1}$). We show that - if the CGM clouds represent future fuel for star-formation - our new results could imply a large drop in the specific star-formation rate across the galaxy mass-range we probe.
  • The circumgalactic medium (CGM) remains one of the least constrained components of galaxies and as such has significant potential for advancing galaxy formation theories. In this work, we vary the extragalactic ultraviolet background for a high-resolution cosmological simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy and examine the effect on the absorption and emission properties of metals in the CGM. We find that a reduced quasar background brings the column density predictions into better agreement with recent data. Similarly, when the observationally derived physical properties of the gas are compared to the simulation, we find that the simulation gas is always at temperatures approximately 0.5 dex higher. Thus, similar column densities can be produced from fundamentally different gas. However, emission maps can provide complementary information to the line-of-sight column densities to better derive gas properties. From the simulations, we find that the brightest emission is less sensitive to the extragalactic background and that it closely follows the fundamental filamentary structure of the halo. This becomes increasingly true as the galaxy evolves from z=1 to z=0 and the majority of the gas transitions to a hotter, more diffuse phase. For the brightest ions (CIII, CIV, OVI), detectable emission can extend as far as 120 kpc at z=0. Finally, resolution is a limiting factor for the conclusions we can draw from emission observations but with moderate resolution and reasonable detection limits, upcoming instrumentation should place constraints on the physical properties of the CGM.
  • Our current understanding of galaxy evolution still has many uncertainties associated with the details of accretion, processing, and removal of gas across cosmic time. The next generation of radio telescopes will image the neutral hydrogen (HI) in galaxies over large volumes at high redshifts, which will provide key insights into these processes. We are conducting the COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, which is the first survey to simultaneously observe HI from z=0 to z~0.5. Here, we report the highest redshift HI 21-cm detection in emission to date of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) COSMOS J100054.83+023126.2 at z=0.376 with the first 178 hours of CHILES data. The total HI mass is $(2.9\pm1.0)\times10^{10}~M_\odot$, and the spatial distribution is asymmetric and extends beyond the galaxy. While optically the galaxy looks undisturbed, the HI distribution suggests an interaction with candidate a candidate companion. In addition, we present follow-up Large Millimeter Telescope CO observations that show it is rich in molecular hydrogen, with a range of possible masses of $(1.8-9.9)\times10^{10}~M_\odot$. This is the first study of the HI and CO in emission for a single galaxy beyond z~0.2.
  • We present a study exploring the nature and properties of the Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM) and its connection to the atomic gas content in the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies as traced by the HI 21cm line. Our sample includes 45 low-z (0.026-0.049) galaxies from the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey. Their CGM was probed via absorption in the spectra of background Quasi-Stellar Objects at impact parameters of 63 to 231kpc. The spectra were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected neutral hydrogen (Ly$\alpha$ absorption-lines) in the CGM of 92% of the galaxies. We find the radial profile of the CGM as traced by the Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width can be fit as an exponential with a scale length of roughly the virial radius of the dark matter halo. We found no correlation between the orientation of sightline relative to the galaxy major axis and the Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width. The velocity spread of the circumgalactic gas is consistent with that seen in the atomic gas in the interstellar medium. We find a strong correlation (99.8% confidence) between the gas fraction (M(HI)/M*) and the impact-parameter-corrected Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width. This is stronger than the analogous correlation between corrected Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width and SFR/M* (97.5% confidence). These results imply a physical connection between the HI disk and the CGM, which is on scales an order-of-magnitude larger. This is consistent with the picture in which the HI disk is nourished by accretion of gas from the CGM.
  • For the first time in history, humans have reached the point where it is possible to construct a revolutionary space-based observatory that has the capability to find dozens of Earth-like worlds, and possibly some with signs of life. This same telescope, designed as a long-lived facility, would also produce transformational scientific advances in every area of astronomy and astrophysics from black hole physics to galaxy formation, from star and planet formation to the origins of the Solar System. The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) commissioned a study on a next-generation UVOIR space observatory with the highest possible scientific impact in the era following JWST. This community-based study focuses on the future space-based options for UV and optical astronomy that significantly advance our understanding of the origin and evolution of the cosmos and the life within it. The committee concludes that a space telescope equipped with a 12-meter class primary mirror can find and characterize dozens of Earth-like planets and make fundamental advances across nearly all fields of astrophysics. The concept is called the High Definition Space Telescope (HDST). The telescope would be located at the Sun-Earth L2 point and would cover a spectral range that, at a minimum, runs from 0.1 to 2 microns. Unlike JWST, HDST will not need to operate at cryogenic temperatures. HDST can be made to be serviceable on orbit but does not require servicing to complete its primary scientific objectives. We present the scientific and technical requirements for HDST and show that it could allow us to determine whether or not life is common outside the Solar System. We do not propose a specific design for such a telescope, but show that designing, building and funding such a facility is feasible beginning in the next decade - if the necessary strategic investments in technology begin now.
  • Despite the existence of well-defined relationships between cold gas and star formation, there is evidence that some galaxies contain large amounts of HI that do not form stars efficiently. By systematically assessing the link between HI and star formation within a sample of galaxies with extremely high HI masses (log M_HI/M_sun > 10), we uncover a population of galaxies with an unexpected combination of high HI masses and low specific star formation rates that exists primarily at stellar masses greater than log M_*/M_sun ~ 10.5. We obtained HI maps of 20 galaxies in this population to understand the distribution of the HI and the physical conditions in the galaxies that could be suppressing star formation in the presence of large quantities of HI. We find that all of the galaxies we observed have low HI surface densities in the range in which inefficient star formation is common. The low HI surface densities are likely the main cause of the low sSFRs, but there is also some evidence that AGN or bulges contribute to the suppression of star formation. The sample's agreement with the global star formation law highlights its usefulness as a tool for understanding galaxies that do not always follow expected relationships.
  • We present an all sky map of the diffuse Galactic far ultraviolet (1344-1786 Angstroms) background using GALEX data, covering 65% of the sky with 11.79 arcmin square pixels. We investigate the dependence of the background on Galactic coordinates, finding that a standard cosecant model of intensity is not a valid fit. Furthermore, we compare our map to Galactic all sky maps of 100 micron emission, N_HI column, and H-alpha intensity. We measure a consistent low level FUV intensity at zero-points for other Galactic quantities, indicating a 300 CU non-scattered isotropic component to the diffuse FUV. There is also a linear relationship between FUV and 100 micron emission below 100 micron values of 8 MJy/sr. We find a similar linear relationship between FUV and NHI below 10^21 square cm. The relationship between FUV and H-alpha intensity has no such constant cutoff. For all Galactic quantities, the slope of the linear portion of the relationship decreases with Galactic latitude. A modified cosecant model, taking into account dust scattering asymmetry and albedo, is able to accurately fit the diffuse FUV at latitudes above 20 degrees. The best fit model indicates an albedo, a, of 0.62 +- 0.04 and a scattering asymmetry function, g, of 0.78 +- 0.05. Deviations from the model fit may indicate regions of excess FUV emission from fluorescence or shock fronts, while low latitude regions with depressed FUV emission are likely the result of self-shielding dusty clouds.
  • In today's mailing, Hogg et al. propose image modeling techniques to maintain 10-ppm-level precision photometry in Kepler data with only two working reaction wheels. While these results are relevant to many scientific goals for the repurposed mission, all modeling efforts so far have used a toy model of the Kepler telescope. Because the two-wheel performance of Kepler remains to be determined, we advocate for the consideration of an alternate strategy for a >1 year program that maximizes the science return from the "low-torque" fields across the ecliptic plane. Assuming we can reach the precision of the original Kepler mission, we expect to detect 800 new planet candidates in the first year of such a mission. Our proposed strategy has benefits for transit timing variation and transit duration variation studies, especially when considered in concert with the future TESS mission. We also expect to help address the first key science goal of Kepler: the frequency of planets in the habitable zone as a function of spectral type.
  • We present the bivariate neutral atomic hydrogen (HI)---stellar mass function (HISMF) (phi(M_HI, M_*)) for massive (log M_*/M_sun > 10) galaxies derived from a sample of 480 local (0.025 < z < 0.050) galaxies observed in HI at Arecibo as part of the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS). We fit six different models to the HISMF and find that a Schechter function that extends down to a 1% HI gas fraction, with an additional fractional contribution below that limit, is the best parametrization of the HISMF. We calculate Omega_{HI, M_* >10^10} and find that massive galaxies contribute 41% of the HI density in the local universe. In addition to the binned HISMF we derive a continuous bivariate fit, which reveals that the Schechter parameters only vary weakly with stellar mass: M_HI^*, the characteristic HI mass, scales as M_*^0.39, alpha, the slope of the HISMF at moderate HI masses, scales as M_*^0.07, and f, the fraction of galaxies with HI gas fraction greater than 1%, scales as M_*^-0.24. The variation of f with stellar mass should be a strong constraint for numerical simulations. To understand the physical mechanisms that produce the shape of the HISMF we redefine the parameters of the Schechter function as explicit functions of stellar mass and star formation rate to produce a trivariate fit. This analysis reveals strong trends with SFR. While M_HI^* varies weakly with stellar mass and SFR, alpha is a stronger function of both stellar mass and especially star formation rate. The HISMF is a crucial tool that can be used to constrain cosmological galaxy simulations, test observational predictions of the HI content of populations of galaxies, and identify galaxies whose properties deviate from average trends.
  • We present the final data release from the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS), a large Arecibo program that measured the HI properties for an unbiased sample of ~800 galaxies with stellar masses greater than 10^10 Msun and redshifts 0.025<z<0.05. This release includes new Arecibo observations for 250 galaxies. We use the full GASS sample to investigate environmental effects on the cold gas content of massive galaxies at fixed stellar mass. The environment is characterized in terms of dark matter halo mass, obtained by cross-matching our sample with the SDSS group catalog of Yang et al. Our analysis provides, for the first time, clear statistical evidence that massive galaxies located in halos with masses of 10^13-10^14 Msun have at least 0.4 dex less HI than objects in lower density environments. The process responsible for the suppression of gas in group galaxies most likely drives the observed quenching of the star formation in these systems. Our findings strongly support the importance of the group environment for galaxy evolution, and have profound implications for semi-analytic models of galaxy formation, which currently do not allow for stripping of the cold interstellar medium in galaxy groups.
  • In this paper, we study the relationship between the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity (L_X), assumed to originate from X-ray binaries (XRBs), and star formation rate (SFR) in UV-selected z<0.1 Lyman break analogs (LBAs). We present Chandra observations for four new GALEX-selected LBAs. Including previously studied LBAs, Haro 11 and VV 114, we find that LBAs demonstrate L_X/SFR ratios that are elevated by ~1.5sigma compared to local galaxies, similar to the ratios found for stacked LBGs in the early Universe (z>2). We show that these LBAs are unlikely to harbor AGN, based on their optical and X-ray spectra and the spatial distribution of the X-rays in three spatially extended cases. We expect that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) dominate the X-ray emission in these galaxies, based on their high specific SFRs (sSFRs=SFR/M* > 10^{-9}/yr), which suggest the prevalence of young stellar populations. Since both LBAs and LBGs have lower dust attenuations and metallicities compared to similar samples of more typical local galaxies, we investigate the effects of dust extinction and metallicity on the L_X/SFR for the broader population of galaxies with high sSFRs (>10^{-10}/yr). The estimated dust extinctions (corresponding to column densities of N_H<10^{22}/cm^2) are expected to have insignificant effects on observed L_X/SFR ratio for the majority of galaxy samples. We find that the observed relationship between L_X/SFR and metallicity appears consistent with theoretical expectations from X-ray binary population synthesis models. Therefore, we conclude that lower metallicities, related to more luminous HMXBs such as ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), drive the elevated L_X/SFR observed in our sample of z<0.1 LBAs. The relatively metal-poor, active mode of star formation in LBAs and distant z>2 LBGs may yield higher total HMXB luminosity than found in typical galaxies in the local Universe.
  • High-resolution 21-cm HI deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved neutral gas maps at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for the COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) done with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We take advantage of the newly expanded capabilities of the telescope to probe the redshift interval 0<z<0.193 in one observation. We observe the COSMOS field for 50 hours, which contains 413 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the imaged field of view of 34' x 34' and the observed redshift interval. We have detected neutral hydrogen gas in 33 galaxies in different environments spanning the probed redshift range, including three without a previously known spectroscopic redshift. The detections have a range of HI and stellar masses, indicating the diversity of galaxies we are probing. We discuss the observations, data reduction, results and highlight interesting detections. We find that the VLA's B-array is the ideal configuration for HI deep fields since its long spacings mitigate RFI. This pilot shows that the VLA is ready to carry out such a survey, and serves as a test for future HI deep fields planned with other SKA pathfinders.
  • In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) All-Sky Survey and Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is ~10% and ~35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R_V parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the ISM.
  • We present a study exploring the impact of a starburst on the properties of the surrounding circum-galactic medium (CGM): gas located beyond the galaxy's stellar body and extending out to the virial radius (200 kpc). We obtained ultraviolet spectroscopic data from the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph (COS) probing the CGM of 20 low-redshift foreground galaxies using background QSOs. Our sample consists of starburst and control galaxies. The latter comprises normal star-forming and passive galaxies with similar stellar masses and impact parameters as the starbursts. We used optical spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey(SDSS) to estimate the properties of the starbursts, inferring average ages of 200 Myrs and burst fractions involving ~10% of their stellar mass. The COS data reveal highly ionized gas traced by CIV in 80%(4/5) of the starburst and in 17%(2/12) of the control sample. The two control galaxies with CIV absorbers differed from the four starbursts in showing multiple low-ionization transitions and strong saturated Lyman-alpha lines. They therefore appear to be physically different systems. We show that the CIV absorbers in the starburst CGM represent a significant baryon repository. The high detection rate of this highly ionized material in the starbursts suggests that starburst-driven winds can affect the CGM out to radii as large as 200 kpc. This is plausible given the inferred properties of the starbursts and the known properties of starburst-driven winds. This would represent the first direct observational evidence of local starbursts impacting the bulk of their gaseous halos, and as such provides new evidence of the importance of this kind of feedback in the evolution of galaxies.
  • We present the second data release from the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS), an ongoing large Arecibo program to measure the HI properties for an unbiased sample of ~1000 galaxies with stellar masses greater than 10^10 Msun and redshifts 0.025<z<0.05. GASS targets are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) imaging surveys, and are observed until detected or until a gas mass fraction limit of a few per cent is reached. This second data installment includes new Arecibo observations of 240 galaxies, and marks the 50% of the complete survey. We present catalogs of the HI, optical and ultraviolet parameters for these galaxies, and their HI-line profiles. Having more than doubled the size of the sample since the first data release, we also revisit the main scaling relations of the HI mass fraction with galaxy stellar mass, stellar mass surface density, concentration index, and NUV-r color, as well as the gas fraction plane introduced in our earlier work.
  • We introduce a new photometric estimator of the HI mass fraction (M_HI/M_*) in local galaxies, which is a linear combination of four parameters: stellar mass, stellar surface mass density, NUV-r colour, and g-i colour gradient. It is calibrated using samples of nearby galaxies (0.025<z<0.05) with HI line detections from the GASS and ALFALFA surveys, and it is demonstrated to provide unbiased M_HI/M_* estimates even for HI-rich galaxies. We apply this estimator to a sample of ~24,000 galaxies from the SDSS/DR7 in the same redshift range. We then bin these galaxies by stellar mass and HI mass fraction and compute projected two point cross-correlation functions with respect to a reference galaxy sample. Results are compared with predictions from current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. The agreement is good for galaxies with stellar masses larger than 10^10 M_sun, but not for lower mass systems. We then extend the analysis by studying the bias in the clustering of HI-poor or HI-rich galaxies with respect to galaxies with normal HI content on scales between 100 kpc and ~5 Mpc. For the HI-deficient population, the strongest bias effects arise when the HI-deficiency is defined in comparison to galaxies of the same stellar mass and size. This is not reproduced by the semi-analytic models, where the quenching of star formation in satellites occurs by "starvation" and does not depend on their internal structure. HI-rich galaxies with masses greater than 10^10 M_sun are found to be anti-biased compared to galaxies with "normal" HI content. Interestingly, no such effect is found for lower mass galaxies.
  • We analyze the role of bars in the build-up of central mass concentrations in massive, disk galaxies. Our parent sample consists of 3757 face-on disk galaxies with redshifts between 0.01 and 0.05, selected from the seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. 1555 galaxies with bars are identified using position angle and ellipticity profiles of the $i$-band light. We compare the ratio of the specific star formation rate measured in the 1-3 kpc central region of the galaxy to that measured for the whole galaxy. Galaxies with strong bars have centrally enhanced star formation; the degree of enhancement depends primarily on the ellipticity of the bar, and not on the size of the bar or on the mass or structure of the host galaxy. The fraction of galaxies with strong bars is highest at stellar masses greater than $3 \times 10^{10} M_{\odot}$, stellar surface densities less than $3 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$ and concentration indices less than 2.5. In this region of parameter space, galaxies with strong bars either have enhanced central star formation rates, or star formation that is {\em suppressed} compared to the mean. This suggests that bars may play a role in the eventual quenching of star formation in galaxies. Only 50% of galaxies with strongly concentrated star formation have strong bars, indicating that other processes such as galaxy interactions also induce central star-bursts. We also find that the ratio of the size of the bar to that of the disk depends mainly on the colour of the galaxy, suggesting that the growth and destruction of bars are regulated by gas accretion, as suggested by simulations.