• Motivated by recent concerns that queuing delays in the Internet are on the rise, we conduct a performance evaluation of Compound TCP (C-TCP) in two topologies: a single bottleneck and a multi-bottleneck topology, under different traffic scenarios. The first topology consists of a single bottleneck router, and the second consists of two distinct sets of TCP flows, regulated by two edge routers, feeding into a common core router. We focus on some dynamical and statistical properties of the underlying system. From a dynamical perspective, we develop fluid models in a regime wherein the number of flows is large, bandwidth-delay product is high, buffers are dimensioned small (independent of the bandwidth-delay product) and routers deploy a Drop-Tail queue policy. A detailed local stability analysis for these models yields the following key insight: smaller buffers favour stability. Additionally, we highlight that larger buffers, in addition to increasing latency, are prone to inducing limit cycles in the system dynamics, via a Hopf bifurcation. These limit cycles in turn cause synchronisation among the TCP flows, and also result in a loss of link utilisation. For the topologies considered, we also empirically analyse some statistical properties of the bottleneck queues. These statistical analyses serve to validate an important modelling assumption: that in the regime considered, each bottleneck queue may be approximated as either an $M/M/1/B$ or an $M/D/1/B$ queue. This immediately makes the modelling perspective attractive and the analysis tractable. Finally, we show that smaller buffers, in addition to ensuring stability and low latency, would also yield fairly good system performance, in terms of throughput and flow completion times.
  • We conduct a local stability and Hopf bifurcation analysis for Compound TCP, with small Drop-tail buffers, in three topologies. The first topology consists of two sets of TCP flows having different round trip times, and feeding into a core router. The second topology corresponds to two queues in tandem, and consists of two distinct sets of TCP flows, regulated by a single edge router and feeding into a core router. The third topology comprises of two distinct sets of TCP flows, regulated by two separate edge routers, and feeding into a common core router. For each of these cases, we conduct a detailed local stability analysis and obtain conditions on the network and protocol parameters to ensure stability. If these conditions get marginally violated, our analysis shows that the underlying systems would lose local stability via a Hopf bifurcation. After exhibiting a Hopf, a key concern is to determine the asymptotic orbital stability of the bifurcating limit cycles. We present a detailed analytical framework to address the stability of the limit cycles, and the type of the Hopf bifurcation by invoking Poincare normal forms and the center manifold theory. We conduct packet-level simulations to highlight the existence and stability of the limit cycles in the queue size dynamics.