• Inferring model parameters from experimental data is a grand challenge in many sciences, including cosmology. This often relies critically on high fidelity numerical simulations, which are prohibitively computationally expensive. The application of deep learning techniques to generative modeling is renewing interest in using high dimensional density estimators as computationally inexpensive emulators of fully-fledged simulations. These generative models have the potential to make a dramatic shift in the field of scientific simulations, but for that shift to happen we need to study the performance of such generators in the precision regime needed for science applications. To this end, in this work we apply Generative Adversarial Networks to the problem of generating weak lensing convergence maps. We show that our generator network produces maps that are described by, with high statistical confidence, the same summary statistics as the fully simulated maps.
  • The nature of dark energy and the complete theory of gravity are two central questions currently facing cosmology. A vital tool for addressing them is the 3-point correlation function (3PCF), which probes deviations from a spatially random distribution of galaxies. However, the 3PCF's formidable computational expense has prevented its application to astronomical surveys comprising millions to billions of galaxies. We present Galactos, a high-performance implementation of a novel, O(N^2) algorithm that uses a load-balanced k-d tree and spherical harmonic expansions to compute the anisotropic 3PCF. Our implementation is optimized for the Intel Xeon Phi architecture, exploiting SIMD parallelism, instruction and thread concurrency, and significant L1 and L2 cache reuse, reaching 39% of peak performance on a single node. Galactos scales to the full Cori system, achieving 9.8PF (peak) and 5.06PF (sustained) across 9636 nodes, making the 3PCF easily computable for all galaxies in the observable universe.
  • We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
  • The statistics of shear peaks have been shown to provide valuable cosmological information beyond the power spectrum, and will be an important constraint of models of cosmology with the large survey areas provided by forthcoming astronomical surveys. Surveys include masked areas due to bright stars, bad pixels etc, which must be accounted for in producing constraints on cosmology from shear maps. We advocate a forward-modeling approach, where the impact of masking (and other survey artifacts) are accounted for in the theoretical prediction of cosmological parameters, rather than removed from survey data. We use masks based on the Deep Lens Survey, and explore the impact of up to 37% of the survey area being masked on LSST and DES-scale surveys. By reconstructing maps of aperture mass, the masking effect is smoothed out, resulting in up to 14% smaller statistical uncertainties compared to simply reducing the survey area by the masked area. We show that, even in the presence of large survey masks, the bias in cosmological parameter estimation produced in the forward-modeling process is ~1%, dominated by bias caused by limited simulation volume. We also explore how this potential bias scales with survey area and find that small survey areas are more significantly impacted by the differences in cosmological structure in the data and simulated volumes, due to cosmic variance.
  • The discovery of cosmic acceleration has inspired ambitious experimental and observational efforts to understand its origin. Many of these take the form of large astronomical surveys, sometimes using new, special-purpose instrumentation, and in some cases entirely new facilities. This Report summarizes some of the major ongoing and planned dark energy experiments, focusing on those in which the U.S. community has a leading or significant supporting role. It provides background information for other Reports from the "Dark Energy and CMB" working group of the APS Division of Particles and Fields long-term planning exercise. We provide 1-2 page summaries of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and its SDSS-IV successor eBOSS, the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the Subaru Hyper-Suprime Camera (HSC) and Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS), the Hobby-Eberley Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HEDTEX), the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), the Large Synpotic Survey Telescope (LSST), and the Euclid and AFTA-WFIRST (Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope) space missions. Over the next one to two decades, these experiments seek to improve the precision of measurements of the cosmic expansion history and cosmic structure growth by factors of 10-100, while simultaneously increasing their redshift range and tightening control and cross-checks of sytematic effects. These measurements will dramatically improve the empirical constraints on theoretical explanations of cosmic acceleration and could lead to breakthroughs in our understanding of the nature of gravity and spacetime or the forms of energy present in the universe.
  • Cosmological measurements require the calculation of nontrivial quantities over large datasets. The next generation of survey telescopes (such as DES, PanSTARRS, and LSST) will yield measurements of billions of galaxies. The scale of these datasets, and the nature of the calculations involved, make cosmological calculations ideal models for implementation on graphics processing units (GPUs). We consider two cosmological calculations, the two-point angular correlation function and the aperture mass statistic, and aim to improve the calculation time by constructing code for calculating them on the GPU. Using CUDA, we implement the two algorithms on the GPU and compare the calculation speeds to comparable code run on the CPU. We obtain a code speed-up of between 10 - 180x faster, compared to performing the same calculation on the CPU. The code has been made publicly available.