• Analysis of all-sky Planck submillimetre observations and the IRAS 100um data has led to the detection of a population of Galactic cold clumps. The clumps can be used to study star formation and dust properties in a wide range of Galactic environments. Our aim is to measure dust spectral energy distribution (SED) variations as a function of the spatial scale and the wavelength. We examine the SEDs at large scales using IRAS, Planck, and Herschel data. At smaller scales, we compare with JCMT/SCUBA-2 850um maps with Herschel data that are filtered using the SCUBA-2 pipeline. Clumps are extracted using the Fellwalker method and their spectra are modelled as modified blackbody functions. According to IRAS and Planck data, most fields have dust colour temperatures T_C ~ 14-18K and opacity spectral index values of beta=1.5-1.9. The clumps/cores identified in SCUBA-2 maps have T~ 13K and similar beta values. There are some indications of the dust emission spectrum becoming flatter at wavelengths longer than 500um. In fits involving Planck data, the significance is limited by the uncertainty of the corrections for CO line contamination. The fits to the SPIRE data give a median beta value slightly above 1.8. In the joint SPIRE and SCUBA-2 850um fits the value decreases to beta ~1.6. Most of the observed T-beta anticorrelation can be explained by noise. The typical submillimetre opacity spectral index beta of cold clumps is found to be ~1.7. This is above the values of diffuse clouds but lower than in some previous studies of dense clumps. There is only tentative evidence of T-beta anticorrelation and beta decreasing at millimetre wavelengths.
  • We present high-resolution (sub-parsec) observations of a giant molecular cloud in the nearest star-forming galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. ALMA Band 6 observations trace the bulk of the molecular gas in $^{12}$CO(2-1) and high column density regions in $^{13}$CO(2-1). Our target is a quiescent cloud (PGCC G282.98-32.40, which we refer to as the "Planck cold cloud" or PCC) in the southern outskirts of the galaxy where star-formation activity is very low and largely confined to one location. We decompose the cloud into structures using a dendrogram and apply an identical analysis to matched-resolution cubes of the 30 Doradus molecular cloud (located near intense star formation) for comparison. Structures in the PCC exhibit roughly 10 times lower surface density and 5 times lower velocity dispersion than comparably sized structures in 30 Dor, underscoring the non-universality of molecular cloud properties. In both clouds, structures with relatively higher surface density lie closer to simple virial equilibrium, whereas lower surface density structures tend to exhibit super-virial line widths. In the PCC, relatively high line widths are found in the vicinity of an infrared source whose properties are consistent with a luminous young stellar object. More generally, we find that the smallest resolved structures ("leaves") of the dendrogram span close to the full range of line widths observed across all scales. As a result, while the bulk of the kinetic energy is found on the largest scales, the small-scale energetics tend to be dominated by only a few structures, leading to substantial scatter in observed size-linewidth relationships.
  • The dust properties in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are studied using the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project photometric data in five bands from 100 to 500 micron. Three simple models of dust emission were fit to the observations: a single temperature blackbody modified by a power- law emissivity (SMBB), a single temperature blackbody modified by a broken power-law emissivity (BEMBB), and two blackbodies with different temperatures, both modified by the same power-law emissivity (TTMBB). Using these models we investigate the origin of the submm excess; defined as the submillimeter (submm) emission above that expected from SMBB models fit to observations < 200 micron. We find that the BEMBB model produces the lowest fit residuals with pixel-averaged 500 micron submm excesses of 27% and 43% for the LMC and SMC, respectively. Adopting gas masses from previous works, the gas-to-dust ratios calculated from our the fitting results shows that the TTMBB fits require significantly more dust than are available even if all the metals present in the interstellar medium (ISM) were condensed into dust. This indicates that the submm excess is more likely to be due to emissivity variations than a second population of colder dust. We derive integrated dust masses of (7.3 +/- 1.7) x 10^5 and (8.3 +/- 2.1) times 10^4 M(sun) for the LMC and SMC, respectively. We find significant correlations between the submm excess and other dust properties; further work is needed to determine the relative contributions of fitting noise and ISM physics to the correlations.
  • We study the emission by dust and stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, a pair of low-metallicity nearby galaxies, as traced by their spatially resolved spectral energy distributions (SEDs). This project combines Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE far-infrared photometry with other data at infrared and optical wavelengths. We build maps of dust and stellar luminosity and mass of both Magellanic Clouds, and analyze the spatial distribution of dust/stellar luminosity and mass ratios. These ratios vary considerably throughout the galaxies, generally between the range $0.01\leq L_{\rm dust}/L_\ast\leq 0.6$ and $10^{-4}\leq M_{\rm dust}/M_\ast\leq 4\times10^{-3}$. We observe that the dust/stellar ratios depend on the interstellar medium (ISM) environment, such as the distance from currently or previously star-forming regions, and on the intensity of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF). In addition, we construct star formation rate (SFR) maps, and find that the SFR is correlated with the dust/stellar luminosity and dust temperature in both galaxies, demonstrating the relation between star formation, dust emission and heating, though these correlations exhibit substantial scatter.
  • The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides a unique laboratory for the study of the lifecycle of dust given its low metallicity (~1/5 solar) and relative proximity (~60 kpc). This motivated the SAGE-SMC (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud) Spitzer Legacy program with the specific goals of studying the amount and type of dust in the present interstellar medium, the sources of dust in the winds of evolved stars, and how much dust is consumed in star formation. This program mapped the full SMC (30 sq. deg.) including the Body, Wing, and Tail in 7 bands from 3.6 to 160 micron using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The data were reduced, mosaicked, and the point sources measured using customized routines specific for large surveys. We have made the resulting mosaics and point source catalogs available to the community. The infrared colors of the SMC are compared to those of other nearby galaxies and the 8 micron/24 micron ratio is somewhat lower and the 70 micron/160 micron ratio is somewhat higher than the average. The global infrared spectral energy distribution shows that the SMC has ~3X lower aromatic emission/PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) abundances compared to most nearby galaxies. Infrared color-magnitude diagrams are given illustrating the distribution of different asymptotic giant branch stars and the locations of young stellar objects. Finally, the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of HII/star formation regions is compared to the equivalent Large Magellanic Cloud average HII/star formation region SED. These preliminary results are expanded in detail in companion papers.
  • A systematic investigation of dust emission associated with the ionized gas has so far been performed only in our Galaxy and for wavelengths longer than 60 {\mu}m. Newly available Spitzer data now offer the opportunity to carry out a similar analysis in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). By cross-correlating Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) data with the ATCA/Parkes HI 21-cm data, the NANTEN 12CO (J=1-0) data, and both the SHASSA H{\alpha} and the Parkes 6-cm data, we investigate the physical properties of dust associated with the different phases of the gas (atomic, molecular and ionized). In particular, we study the presence and nature of dust from 3.6 to 160 {\mu}m and for various regimes of the ionized gas, spanning emission measures (EM) from \sim 1 pc cm-6 (diffuse component) to \sim 10^3 pc cm-6 (HII regions). Using a dust emission model, and testing our results with several radiation field spectra, we show that dust in the ionized gas is warmer than dust associated with other phases (atomic and molecular). We also find a decrease of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) relative abundance with respect to big grains (BGs), as well as an increase of the near infrared (NIR) continuum. These three results (e.g. warmer temperature, decrease of PAH abundance and increase of the NIR continuum) are found consistently for all regimes of the ionized gas. On the contrary, the molecular phase appears to provide favorable conditions for the survival of PAHs. Furthermore, the very small grain (VSG) relative abundance tends to increase in the ionized phase, especially in bright HII regions. Last but not least, our analysis shows that the emissivity of dust associated with the ionized gas is lower in the LMC than in our Galaxy, and that this difference is not accounted for by the lower metallicity of the LMC.
  • Dust emission at submm to cm wavelengths is often simply the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of dust particles at thermal equilibrium and is used as a cold mass tracer in various environments including nearby galaxies. However, well-sampled spectral energy distributions of the nearby, star-forming Magellanic Clouds have a pronounced (sub-)millimeter excess (Israel et al., 2010). This study attempts to confirm the existence of such a millimeter excess above expected dust, free-free and synchrotron emission and to explore different possibilities for its origin. We model NIR to radio spectral energy distributions of the Magellanic Clouds with dust, free-free and synchrotron emission. A millimeter excess emission is confirmed above these components and its spectral shape and intensity are analysed in light of different scenarios: very cold dust, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) fluctuations, a change of the dust spectral index and spinning dust emission. We show that very cold dust or CMB fluctuations are very unlikely explanations for the observed excess in these two galaxies. The excess in the LMC can be satisfactorily explained either by a change of the spectral index due to intrinsic properties of amorphous grains, or by spinning dust emission. In the SMC however, due to the importance of the excess, the dust grain model including TLS/DCD effects cannot reproduce the observed emission in a simple way. A possible solution was achieved with spinning dust emission, but many assumptions on the physical state of the interstellar medium had to be made. Further studies, using higher resolution data from Planck and Herschel, are needed to probe the origin of this observed submm-cm excess more definitely. Our study shows that the different possible origins will be best distinguished where the excess is the highest, as is the case in the SMC.
  • Spitzer and IRAS observations of the LMC suggest an excess of FIR emission with respect to the gas surface density traced by 12CO and HI 21 cm emission lines. This "FIR excess" is noticeable near molecular clouds in the LMC, and has usually been interpreted as the presence of a self-shielded H2 component not traced by CO molecular clouds' envelopes. Based on Herschel observations, we examine the correlation between gas and dust at higher resolution than previously achieved. We consider three additional causes for the FIR excess: X factor, FIR dust emissivity, and gas-to-dust ratio variations between the diffuse and dense phases of the ISM. We examine the structure of NT80 and NT71, two molecular clouds detected in the NANTEN 12CO survey of the LMC. Dust surface density maps are derived from the HERITAGE data. The gas phase is traced by MAGMA 12CO and ATCA HI 21 cm observations of the LMC. The dust emissivity, gas-to-dust ratio, and X factor required to match the dust and gas surface densities are derived, and their correlations with the dust surface density are examined. The dust surface density is spatially correlated with the atomic and molecular gas phases. The dust temperature is consistently lower in the dense phase of the ISM than in the diffuse phase. We confirm variations in the ratio of FIR emission to gas surface density derived from HI and CO observations. There is an excess of FIR emission, spatially correlated with regions of intermediate HI and dust surface densities (Av = 1-2), and little or no CO. While there is no significant trend in the dust emissivity or gas-to-dust ratio with dust surface density, the X factor is enhanced at Av = 1-2. We conclude that H2 envelopes not traced by CO and X factor variations close to the CO boundary are more likely to cause these deviations between FIR emission and gas surface density than gas-to-dust ratio or emissivity variations.
  • Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Such variations are expected, as the explosive events which have lead to the formation of the many HI shells observed should have affected the dust properties. Using a model and comparing with a reference spectral energy distribution from our Galaxy, we deduce the relative abundance variations of small dust grains across the LMC. We examined the infrared color ratios as well as the relative abundances of very small grains (VSGs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to the big grain (BG) abundance. Results show that each dust component could have different origins or evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). The VSG abundance traces the star formation activity and could result from shattering of larger grains, whereas the PAH abundance increases around molecular clouds as well as in the stellar bar, where they could have been injected into the ISM during mass loss from old stars.