• Pulsars are the most stable macroscopic clocks found in nature. Spinning with periods as short as a few milliseconds, their stability can supersede that of the best atomic clocks on Earth over timescales of a few years. Stable clocks are synonymous with precise measurements, which is why pulsars play a role of paramount importance in testing fundamental physics. As a pulsar rotates, the radio beam emitted along its magnetic axis appears to us as pulses because of the lighthouse effect. Thanks to the extreme regularity of the emitted pulses, minuscule disturbances leave particular fingerprints in the times-of-arrival (TOAs) measured on Earth with the technique of pulsar timing. Tiny deviations from the expected TOAs, predicted according to a theoretical timing model based on known physics, can therefore reveal a plethora of interesting new physical effects. Pulsar timing can be used to measure the dynamics of pulsars in compact binaries, thus probing the post-Newtonian expansion of general relativity beyond the weak field regime, while offering unique possibilities of constraining alternative theories of gravity. Additionally, the correlation of TOAs from an ensemble of millisecond pulsars can be exploited to detect low-frequency gravitational waves of astrophysical and cosmological origins. We present a comprehensive review of the many applications of pulsar timing as a probe of gravity, describing in detail the general principles, current applications and results, as well as future prospects.
  • Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) are collections of well-timed millisecond pulsars that are being used as detectors of gravitational waves (GWs). Given current sensitivity, projected improvements in PTAs and the predicted strength of the GW signals, the detection of GWs with PTAs could occur within the next decade. One way we can improve a PTA is to reduce the measurement noise present in the pulsar timing residuals. If the pulsars included in the array display uncorrelated noise, the root mean square (RMS) of the timing residuals is predicted to scale as $\mathrm{T}^{-1/2}$, where T is the dwell time per observation. In this case, the sensitivity of the array can be increased by increasing T. We studied the 17 pulsars in the five year North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) data set to determine if the noise in the timing residuals of the pulsars observed was consistent with this property. For comparison, we performed the same analysis on PSR B1937+21, a pulsar that is known to display red noise. With this method, we find that 15 of the 17 NANOGrav pulsars have timing residuals consistent with the inverse square law. The data also suggest that these 15 pulsars can be observed for up to eight times as long while still exhibiting an RMS that scales as root T.
  • We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • We analyze timing noise from five years of Arecibo and Green Bank observations of the seventeen millisecond pulsars of the North-American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) pulsar timing array. The weighted autocovariance of the timing residuals was computed for each pulsar and compared against two possible models for the underlying noise process. The first model includes red noise and predicts the autocovariance to be a decaying exponential as a function of time lag. The second model is Gaussian white noise whose autocovariance would be a delta function. We also perform a ``nearest-neighbor" correlation analysis. We find that the exponential process does not accurately describe the data. Two pulsars, J1643-1224 and J1910+1256, exhibit weak red noise, but the rest are well described as white noise. The overall lack of evidence for red noise implies that sensitivity to a (red) gravitational wave background signal is limited by statistical rather than systematic uncertainty. In all pulsars, the ratio of non-white noise to white noise is low, so that we can increase the cadence or integration times of our observations and still expect the root-mean-square of timing residual averages to decrease by the square-root of observation time, which is key to improving the sensitivity of the pulsar timing array.