• We present observations of N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HCN(1-0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 square arcminutes of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of 7 arcsecs. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N2H+(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of 0.2 pc and widths of 0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.
  • Young stars are formed within dusty discs. The grains in the disc are originally of the same size as interstellar dust. Models predict that these grains will grow in size through coagulation. Observations of the silicate features at micron wavelengths are consistent with growth to micron sizes whereas the slope of the SED at longer wavelengths traces growth up to mm sizes. We here look for a correlation between these two grain growth indicators. A large sample of T-Tauri and Herbig-Ae/Be stars was observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 5-13 micron; a subsample was observed at mm wavelengths. We complement this subsample with data from the literature to maximise the overlap between micron and mm observations and search for correlations. Synthetic spectra are produced to determine which processes may produce the dust evolution. Dust disc masses in the range <1 to 7 x 10^-4 MSun are obtained. Most sources have a mm spectral slope consistent with grain growth. There is a tentative correlation between the 10-micron silicate feature and the mm slope of the SED. The observed sources seem to be grouped per star-forming region in the micron-vs-mm diagram. The modelling results show that the 10-micron feature becomes flatter and subsequently the mm slope becomes shallower. Grain size distributions shallower than that of the ISM and/or bright central stars are required to explain specific features. Settling of larger grains towards the disc midplane affects the 10-micron feature, but hardly the mm slope. The tentative correlation between the strength of the 10-micron feature and the mm slope suggests that the inner and outer disc evolve simultaneously. Dust with a mass dominated by mm-sized grains is required to explain the shallowest mm slopes. Other processes besides grain growth may also be responsible for the removal of small grains.