• We study the microscopic origins of photocurrent generation in the topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$ via time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We image the unoccupied band structure as it evolves following a circularly polarized optical excitation and observe an asymmetric electron population in momentum space, which is the spectroscopic signature of a photocurrent. By analyzing the rise times of the population we identify which occupied and unoccupied electronic states are coupled by the optical excitation. We conclude that photocurrents can only be excited via resonant optical transitions coupling to spin-orbital textured states. Our work provides a microscopic understanding of how to control photocurrents in systems with spin-orbit coupling and broken inversion symmetry.
  • Almost a decade has passed since the serendipitous discovery of the iron-based high temperature superconductors (FeSCs) in 2008. The question of how much similarity the FeSCs have with the copper oxide high temperature superconductors emerged since the initial discovery of long-range antiferromagnetism in the FeSCs in proximity to superconductivity. Despite the great resemblance in their phase diagrams, there exist important disparities between FeSCs and cuprates that need to be considered in order to paint a full picture of these two families of high temperature superconductors. One of the key differences lies in the multi-orbital multi-band nature of FeSCs, in contrast to the effective single-band model for cuprates. Due to the complexity of multi-orbital band structures, the orbital degree of freedom is often neglected in formulating the theoretical models for FeSCs. On the experimental side, systematic studies of the orbital related phenomena in FeSCs have been largely lacking. In this review, we summarize angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements across various FeSC families in literature, focusing on the systematic trend of orbital dependent electron correlations and the role of different Fe 3d orbitals in driving the nematic transition, the spin-density-wave transition, and implications for superconductivity.
  • A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • The high temperature superconductivity in single-unit-cell (1UC) FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO)(001) and the observation of replica bands by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have led to the conjecture that the coupling between FeSe electron and the STO phonon is responsible for the enhancement of Tc over other FeSe-based superconductors1,2. However the recent observation of a similar superconducting gap in FeSe grown on the (110) surface of STO raises the question of whether a similar mechanism applies3,4. Here we report the ARPES study of the electronic structure of FeSe grown on STO(110). Similar to the results in FeSe/STO(001), clear replica bands are observed. We also present a comparative study of STO (001) and STO(110) bare surfaces, where photo doping generates metallic surface states. Similar replica bands separating from the main band by approximately the same energy are observed, indicating this coupling is a generic feature of the STO surfaces and interfaces. Our findings suggest that the large superconducting gaps observed in FeSe films grown on two different STO surface terminations are likely enhanced by a common coupling between FeSe electrons and STO phonons.
  • To elucidate the mechanisms behind the enhanced $T_c$ in monolayer (1ML) FeSe on SrTiO$_3$ (STO), we grew highly strained 1ML FeSe on the rectangular (100) face of rutile TiO$_2$, and observed the coexistence of replica bands and superconductivity with a $T_c$ of 63 K. From the similar $T_c$ between this system and 1ML FeSe on STO (001), we conclude that strain and dielectric constant are likely unimportant to the enhanced $T_c$ in these systems. A systematic comparison of 1ML FeSe on TiO$_2$ with other systems in the FeSe family shows that while charge transfer alone can enhance $T_c$, it is only with the addition of interfacial electron-phonon coupling that $T_c$ can be increased to the level seen in 1ML FeSe on STO.
  • Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide (FeCh) superconductors, the only iron-based family in proximity to an insulating phase. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to measure three representative FeCh superconductors, FeTe0.56Se0.44, K0.76Fe1.72Se2, and monolayer FeSe film grown on SrTiO3. We show that, these FeChs are all in a strongly correlated regime at low temperatures, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi-surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic superconducting state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. These observations establish that FeChs display universal orbital-selective strong correlation behaviors that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase (OSMP), hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.
  • We study optimally doped Bi-2212 ($T_\textrm{c}=96$~K) using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Energy-resolved population lifetimes are extracted and compared with single-particle lifetimes measured by equilibrium photoemission. The population lifetimes deviate from the single-particle lifetimes in the low excitation limit by one to two orders of magnitude. Fundamental considerations of electron scattering unveil that these two lifetimes are in general distinct, yet for systems with only electron-phonon scattering they should converge in the low-temperature, low-fluence limit. The qualitative disparity in our data, even in this limit, suggests that scattering channels beyond electron-phonon interactions play a significant role in the electron dynamics of cuprate superconductors.
  • The level of electronic correlation has been one of the key questions in understanding the nature of superconductivity. Among the iron-based superconductors, the iron chalcogenide family exhibits the strongest electron correlations. To gauge the correlation strength, we performed systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on the iron chalcogenide series Fe$_{1+y}$Se$_x$Te$_{1-x}$ (0$<$x$<$0.59), a model system with the simplest structure. Our measurement reveals an incoherent to coherent crossover in the electronic structure as the selenium ratio increases and the system evolves from the weakly localized to more itinerant state. Furthermore, we found that the effective mass of bands dominated by the d$_{xy}$ orbital character significantly decreases with increasing selenium ratio, as compared to the d$_{xz}$/d$_{yz}$ orbital-dominated bands. The orbital dependent change in the correlation level agrees with theoretical calculations on the band structure renormalization, and may help to understand the onset of superconductivity in Fe$_{1+y}$Se$_x$Te$_{1-x}$.
  • In the high-temperature ($T_{c}$) cuprate superconductors, increasing evidence suggests that the pseudogap, existing below the pseudogap temperature $T$*, has a distinct broken electronic symmetry from that of superconductivity. Particularly, recent scattering experiments on the underdoped cuprates have suggested that a charge ordering competes with superconductivity. However, no direct link of this physics and the important low-energy excitations has been identified. Here we report an antagonistic singularity at $T_{c}$ in the spectral weight of Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+{\delta}}$ as a compelling evidence for phase competition, which persists up to a high hole concentration $p$ ~ 0.22. Comparison with a theoretical calculation confirms that the singularity is a signature of competition between the order parameters for the pseudogap and superconductivity. The observation of the spectroscopic singularity at finite temperatures over a wide doping range provides new insights into the nature of the competitive interplay between the two intertwined phases and the complex phase diagram near the pseudogap critical point.
  • The nature of metallicity and the level of electronic correlations in the antiferromagnetically ordered parent compounds are two important open issues for the iron-based superconductivity. We perform a temperature-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of Fe1.02Te, the parent compound for iron chalcogenide superconductors. Deep in the antiferromagnetic state, the spectra exhibit a "peak-dip-hump" line shape associated with two clearly separate branches of dispersion, characteristics of polarons seen in manganites and lightly-doped cuprates. As temperature increases towards the Neel temperature (T_N), we observe a decreasing renormalization of the peak dispersion and a counterintuitive sharpening of the hump linewidth, suggestive of an intimate connection between the weakening electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling and antiferromagnetism. Our finding points to the highly-correlated nature of Fe1.02Te ground state featured by strong interactions among the charge, spin and lattice and a good metallicity plausibly contributed by the coherent polaron motion.
  • In this work, we study the A$_{x}$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ (A=K, Rb) superconductors using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In the low temperature state, we observe an orbital-dependent renormalization for the bands near the Fermi level in which the dxy bands are heavily renormliazed compared to the dxz/dyz bands. Upon increasing temperature to above 150K, the system evolves into a state in which the dxy bands have diminished spectral weight while the dxz/dyz bands remain metallic. Combined with theoretical calculations, our observations can be consistently understood as a temperature induced crossover from a metallic state at low temperature to an orbital-selective Mott phase (OSMP) at high temperatures. Furthermore, the fact that the superconducting state of A$_{x}$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ is near the boundary of such an OSMP constraints the system to have sufficiently strong on-site Coulomb interactions and Hund's coupling, and hence highlight the non-trivial role of electron correlation in this family of iron superconductors.
  • Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies were performed on two compounds (TlBiTe$_2$ and TlBiSe$_2$) from a recently proposed three dimensional topological insulator family in Thallium-based III-V-VI$_2$ ternary chalcogenides. For both materials, we show that the electronic band structures are in broad agreement with the $ab$ $initio$ calculations; by surveying over the entire surface Brillouin zone (BZ), we demonstrate that there is a single Dirac cone reside at the center of BZ, indicating its topological non-triviality. For TlBiSe$_2$, the observed Dirac point resides at the top of the bulk valance band, making it a large gap ($\geq$200$meV$) topological insulator; while for TlBiTe$_2$, we found there exist a negative indirect gap between the bulk conduction band at $M$ point and the bulk valance band near $\Gamma$, making it a semi-metal at proper doping. Interestingly, the unique band structures of TlBiTe$_2$ we observed further suggest TlBiTe$_2$ may be a candidate for topological superconductors.
  • We report the discovery of a self-doped multi-layer high Tc superconductor Ba2Ca3Cu4O8F2(F0234) which contains distinctly different superconducting gap magnitudes along its two Fermi surface(FS) sheets. While formal valence counting would imply this material to be an undoped insulator, it is a self-doped superconductor with a Tc of 60K, possessing simultaneously both electron- and hole-doped FS sheets. Intriguingly, the FS sheet characterized by the much larger gap is the electron-doped one, which has a shape disfavoring two electronic features considered to be important for the pairing mechanism: the van Hove singularity and the antiferromagnetic (Pi/a, Pi/a) scattering.