• Commodity OS kernels are known to have broad attack surfaces due to the large code base and the numerous features such as device drivers. For a real-world use case (e.g., an Apache Server), many kernel services are unused and only a small amount of kernel code is used. Within the used code, a certain part is invoked only at the runtime phase while the rest are executed at startup and/or shutdown phases in the kernel's lifetime run. In this paper, we propose a reliable and practical system, named KASR, which transparently reduces attack surfaces of commodity OS kernels at the runtime phase without requiring their source code. The KASR system, residing in a trusted hypervisor, achieves the attack surface reduction through two reliable steps: (1) deprives unused code of executable permissions, and (2) transparently segments used code and selectively activates them according to their phases. KASR also prevents unknown code from executing in the kernel space, and thus it is able to defend against all kernel code injection attacks. We implement a prototype of KASR on the Xen-4.8.2 hypervisor and evaluate its security effectiveness on Linux kernel-4.4.0-87-generic. Our evaluation shows that KASR reduces kernel attack surface by 64%, trims off 40% of in-memory CVE vulnerabilities and 66% of system calls, and prohibits 99% of on-disk device drivers (including their related CVEs) from executing. Besides, KASR successfully detects and blocks all 6 real-world kernel rootkits. We measure its performance overhead with three benchmark tools (i.e., SPECINT, httperf and bonnie++). The experimental results indicate that KASR imposes less than 1% averaged performance overhead compared to an unmodified Xen hypervisor.
  • Many techniques for privacy-preserving data mining (PPDM) have been investigated over the past decade. Often, the entities involved in the data mining process are end-users or organizations with limited computing and storage resources. As a result, such entities may want to refrain from participating in the PPDM process. To overcome this issue and to take many other benefits of cloud computing, outsourcing PPDM tasks to the cloud environment has recently gained special attention. We consider the scenario where n entities outsource their databases (in encrypted format) to the cloud and ask the cloud to perform the clustering task on their combined data in a privacy-preserving manner. We term such a process as privacy-preserving and outsourced distributed clustering (PPODC). In this paper, we propose a novel and efficient solution to the PPODC problem based on k-means clustering algorithm. The main novelty of our solution lies in avoiding the secure division operations required in computing cluster centers altogether through an efficient transformation technique. Our solution builds the clusters securely in an iterative fashion and returns the final cluster centers to all entities when a pre-determined termination condition holds. The proposed solution protects data confidentiality of all the participating entities under the standard semi-honest model. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first work to discuss and propose a comprehensive solution to the PPODC problem that incurs negligible cost on the participating entities. We theoretically estimate both the computation and communication costs of the proposed protocol and also demonstrate its practical value through experiments on a real dataset.