• We present a solution for the ultraviolet (UV) - submillimeter (submm) interstellar radiation fields (ISRFs) of the Milky Way, derived from modelling COBE, IRAS and Planck maps of the all-sky emission in the near-, mid-, far-infrared and submm.The analysis uses the axisymmetric radiative transfer (RT) model that we have previously implemented to model the panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of star forming galaxies in the nearby universe, but with a new methodology allowing for optimisation of the radial and vertical geometry of stellar emissivity and dust opacity, as deduced from the highly resolved emission seen from the vantage point of the Sun. As such, this is the first self-consistent model of the broad-band continuum emission from the Milky Way. In this paper, we present model predictions for the spatially integrated SED of the Milky Way as seen from the Sun, showing good agreement with the data, and give a detailed description of the solutions for the distribution of ISRFs, as well as their physical origin, throughout the volume of the galaxy. We explore how the spatial and spectral distribution of our new predictions for the ISRF in the Milky Way affects the amplitude and spectral distribution of the gamma-rays produced via Inverse Compton scattering for cosmic ray electrons situated at different positions in the galaxy, as well as the attenuation of the gamma-rays due to interactions of the gamma-ray photons with photons of the ISRF. We also compare and contrast our solutions for the ISRF with those incorporated in the GALPROP package used for modelling the high energy emission from cosmic rays in the Milky Way.
  • This review summarises recent observational results regarding the evolution of angular momentum and disks in brown dwarfs. The observations clearly show that brown dwarfs beyond ages of 10 Myr are exclusively fast rotators and do not spin down with age. This suggests that rotational braking by magnetic winds becomes very inefficient or ceases to work in the substellar regime. There is, however, some evidence for braking by disks during the first few Myrs in the evolution, similar to stars. Brown dwarf disks turn out to be scaled down versions of circumstellar disks, with dust settling, grain growth, and in some cases cleared out inner regions. The global disk properties roughly scale with central object mass. The evolutionary timescales in substellar disks are entirely consistent with what is found for stars, which may be challenging to understand. Given these findings, it is likely that brown dwarfs are able to form miniature planetary systems.
  • The statistics of discovered exoplanets suggest that planets form efficiently. However, there are fundamental unsolved problems, such as excessive inward drift of particles in protoplanetary disks during planet formation. Recent theories invoke dust traps to overcome this problem. We report the detection of a dust trap in the disk around the star Oph IRS 48 using observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The 0.44-millimeter-wavelength continuum map shows high-contrast crescent-shaped emission on one side of the star originating from millimeter-sized grains, whereas both the mid-infrared image (micrometer-sized dust) and the gas traced by the carbon monoxide 6-5 rotational line suggest rings centered on the star. The difference in distribution of big grains versus small grains/gas can be modeled with a vortex-shaped dust trap triggered by a companion.
  • Embedded clusters usually contain young stellar objects in different evolutionary stages. We investigate number ratios of objects in these classes in the star-forming regions rho Ophiuchi, Serpens, Taurus, Chamaeleon I, NGC 7129, IC 1396A, and IC 348. They are compared to the temporal evolution of young stars in numerical simulations of gravoturbulent fragmentation in order to constrain the models and to possibly determine the evolutionary stage of the clusters. It turns out that Serpens is the youngest, and IC 348 the most evolved cluster, although the time when the observations are best represented varies strongly depending on the model. Furthermore, we find an inverse correlation of the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the models with the Mach number. However, the observational SFE values cannot be reproduced by the current isothermal models. This argues for models that take into account protostellar feedback processes and/or the effects of magnetic fields.