• [Abridged] We study the abundance and clustering properties of HI at redshifts $z\leqslant5$ using TNG100, a large state-of-the-art magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of a 75 Mpc/h box size. We show that most of the HI lies within dark matter halos and quantify the average HI mass hosted by halos of mass M at redshift z. We find that only halos with circular velocities larger than $\simeq$ 30 km/s contain HI. While the density profiles of HI exhibit a large halo-to-halo scatter, the mean profiles are universal across mass and redshift. The HI in low-mass halos is mostly located in the central galaxy, while in massive halos is concentrated in the satellites. We show that the HI and matter density probability distribution functions differ significantly. Our results point out that for small halos the HI bulk velocity goes in the same direction and has the same magnitude as the halo peculiar velocity, while in large halos differences show up. We find that halo HI velocity dispersion follows a power-law with halo mass. We find a complicated HI bias, with HI becoming non-linear already at $k=0.3$ h/Mpc at $z\gtrsim3$. Our simulation reproduces the DLAs bias value from observations. We find that the clustering of HI can be accurately reproduced by perturbative methods. We identify a new secondary bias, by showing that the clustering of halos depends not only on mass but also on HI content. We compute the amplitude of the HI shot-noise and find that it is small at all redshifts. We study the clustering of HI in redshift-space, and show that linear theory can explain the ratio between the monopoles in redshift- and real-space down to small scales at high redshift. We find that the amplitude of the Fingers-of-God effect is larger for HI than for matter. We point out that accurate 21 cm maps can be created from N-body or approximate simulations rather than full hydrodynamic simulations.
  • We explore the abundance, spatial distribution, and physical properties of the OVI, OVII, and OVIII ions of oxygen in circumgalactic and intergalactic media (the CGM, IGM, and WHIM). We use the TNG100 and TNG300 large volume cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical simulations. Modeling the ionization states of simulated oxygen, we find good agreement with observations of the low-redshift OVI column density distribution function (CDDF), and present its evolution for all three ions from z=0 to z=4. Producing mock quasar absorption line spectral surveys, we show that the IllustrisTNG simulations are fully consistent with constraints on the OVI content of the CGM from COS-Halos and other low redshift observations, producing columns as high as observed. We measure the total amount of mass and average column densities of each ion using hundreds of thousands of simulated galaxies spanning 10^11 < Mhalo/Msun < 10^15 corresponding to 10^9 < M*/Msun < 10^12 in stellar mass. Stacked radial profiles of OVI are computed in 3D number density and 2D projected column, decomposing into the 1-halo and 2-halo terms. Relating halo OVI to properties of the central galaxy, we find a correlation between the (g-r) color of a galaxy and the total amount of OVI in its CGM. In comparison to the COS-Halos finding, this leads to a dichotomy of columns around star-forming versus passive galaxies at fixed stellar (or halo) mass. We demonstrate that this correlation is a direct result of blackhole feedback associated with quenching and represents a causal consequence of galactic-scale baryonic feedback impacting the physical state of the circumgalactic medium.
  • The distribution of elements in galaxies provides a wealth of information about their production sites and their subsequent mixing into the interstellar medium. Here we investigate the distribution of elements within stars in the IllustrisTNG simulations. In particular, we analyze the abundance ratios of magnesium and europium in Milky Way-like galaxies from the TNG100 simulation (stellar masses ${\log} (M_\star / {\rm M}_\odot) \sim 9.7 - 11.2$). As abundances of magnesium and europium for individual stars in the Milky Way are observed across a variety of spatial locations and metallicities, comparison with the stellar abundances in our more than $850$ Milky Way-like galaxies provides stringent constraints on our chemical evolutionary methods. To this end we use the magnesium to iron ratio as a proxy for the effects of our SNII and SNIa metal return prescription, and a means to compare our simulated abundances to a wide variety of galactic observations. The europium to iron ratio tracks the rare ejecta from neutron star -- neutron star mergers, the assumed primary site of europium production in our models, which in turn is a sensitive probe of the effects of metal diffusion within the gas in our simulations. We find that europium abundances in Milky Way-like galaxies show no correlation with assembly history, present day galactic properties, and average galactic stellar population age. In general, we reproduce the europium to iron spread at low metallicities observed in the Milky Way, with the level of enhancement being sensitive to gas properties during redshifts $z \approx 2-4$. We show that while the overall normalization of [Eu/Fe] is susceptible to resolution and post-processing assumptions, the relatively large spread of [Eu/Fe] at low [Fe/H] when compared to that at high [Fe/H] is very robust.
  • We use the IllustrisTNG simulations to investigate the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for star-forming cluster galaxies as a function of the formation history of their cluster host. The simulations predict an enhancement in the gas-phase metallicities of star-forming cluster galaxies (10^9< M_star<10^10 M_sun) at z<1.0 in comparisons to field galaxies. This is qualitatively consistent with observations. We find that the metallicity enhancement of cluster galaxies appears prior to their infall into the central cluster potential, indicating for the first time a systematic "chemical pre-processing" signature for {\it infalling} cluster galaxies. Namely, galaxies which will fall into a cluster by z=0 show a ~0.05 dex enhancement in the MZR compared to field galaxies at z<0.5. Based on the inflow rate of gas into cluster galaxies and its metallicity, we identify that the accretion of pre-enriched gas is the key driver of the chemical evolution of such galaxies, particularly in the stellar mass range (10^9< M_star<10^10 M_sun). We see signatures of an environmental dependence of the ambient/inflowing gas metallicity which extends well outside the nominal virial radius of clusters. Our results motivate future observations looking for pre-enrichment signatures in dense environments.
  • We introduce the first two simulations of the IllustrisTNG project, a next generation of cosmological magnetohydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the optical colors of galaxies. We explore TNG100, a rerun of the original Illustris box, and TNG300, which includes 2x2500^3 resolution elements in a volume twenty times larger. Here we present first results on the galaxy color bimodality at low redshift. Accounting for the attenuation of stellar light by dust, we compare the simulated (g-r) colors of 10^9 < M*/Msun < 10^12.5 galaxies to the observed distribution from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find a striking improvement with respect to the original Illustris simulation, as well as excellent quantitative agreement in comparison to the observations, with a sharp transition in median color from blue to red at a characteristic M* ~ 10^10.5 Msun. Investigating the build-up of the color-mass plane and the formation of the red sequence, we demonstrate that the primary driver of galaxy color transition in the TNG model is supermassive blackhole feedback in its low-accretion state. Across the entire population we measure a median color transition timescale dt_green of ~1.6 Gyr, a value which drops for increasingly massive galaxies. We find signatures of the physical process of quenching: at fixed stellar mass, redder galaxies have lower SFRs, gas fractions, and gas metallicities; their stellar populations are also older and their large-scale interstellar magnetic fields weaker than in bluer galaxies. Finally, we measure the amount of stellar mass growth on the red sequence. Galaxies with M* > 10^11 Msun which redden at z<1 accumulate on average ~25% of their final z=0 mass post-reddening; at the same time, ~18% of such massive galaxies acquire half or more of their final stellar mass while on the red sequence.
  • The IllustrisTNG project is a new suite of cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation performed with the Arepo code and updated models for feedback physics. Here we introduce the first two simulations of the series, TNG100 and TNG300, and quantify the stellar mass content of about 4000 massive galaxy groups and clusters ($10^{13} \leq M_{\rm 200c}/M_{\rm sun} \leq 10^{15}$) at recent times ($z \leq 1$). The richest clusters have half of their total stellar mass bound to satellite galaxies, with the other half being associated with the central galaxy and the diffuse intra-cluster light. The exact ICL fraction depends sensitively on the definition of a central galaxy's mass and varies in our most massive clusters between 20 to 40% of the total stellar mass. Haloes of $5\times 10^{14}M_{\rm sun}$ and above have more diffuse stellar mass outside 100 kpc than within 100 kpc, with power-law slopes of the radial mass density distribution as shallow as the dark matter's ( $-3.5 < \alpha_{\rm 3D} < -3$). Total halo mass is a very good predictor of stellar mass, and vice versa: at $z=0$, the 3D stellar mass measured within 30 kpc scales as $\propto (M_{\rm 500c})^{0.49}$ with a $\sim 0.12$ dex scatter. This is possibly too steep in comparison to the available observational constraints, even though the abundance of TNG less massive galaxies ($< 10^{11}M_{\rm sun}$ in stars) is in good agreement with the measured galaxy stellar mass functions at recent epochs. The 3D sizes of massive galaxies fall too on a tight ($\sim$0.16 dex scatter) power-law relation with halo mass, with $r^{\rm stars}_{\rm 0.5} \propto (M_{\rm 500c})^{0.53}$. Even more fundamentally, halo mass alone is a good predictor for the whole stellar mass profiles beyond the inner few kpc, and we show how on average these can be precisely recovered given a single mass measurement of the galaxy or its halo.
  • We use the IllustrisTNG (TNG) cosmological simulations to provide theoretical expectations for the DM mass fractions (DMFs) and circular velocity profiles within the inner regions of haloes where galaxies reside. TNG predicts flat circular velocity curves for $z=0$ MW-like haloes beyond a few kpc from the galaxy centre, in better agreement with observational constraints than its predecessor, Illustris. TNG also predicts an enhancement of the DM mass within the 3D stellar half-mass radius ($r_{\rm half}$) of galaxies ($M_{200c}=10^{10}-10^{13}M_{\odot}$, $z\le 2$) in comparison to their DM-only and Illustris counterparts. This enhancement leads TNG present-day galaxies to be dominated by DM within their inner regions, with $f_{\rm DM} (< r_{\rm half}) \gtrsim 0.5$ at all masses and with a minimum for MW-mass haloes. The DMFs in $z=0$ TNG ellipticals are in broad agreement with the median, but not the scatter of e.g. the observed {\sc sluggs} galaxies, with $f_{\rm DM}(< 2-5 \times r_{\rm half})\sim 0.5-0.9$ in $M_{\rm stars}\gtrsim 10^{10}M_{\odot}$ galaxies. The DMFs measured within $r_{\rm half}$ decline towards higher redshifts, such evolution being dominated by the increase in galaxy size with time. At $z\sim2$, the DMF in disc-like TNG galaxies decreases with increasing galaxy mass, with $f_{\rm DM}(< r_{\rm half}) \sim 0.10-0.65$ for $10^{10} \lesssim M_{\rm stars}/M_{\odot} \lesssim 10^{12}$, and are two times higher than if TNG galaxies resided in NFW DM haloes unaffected by baryonic physics. It remains to be properly assessed whether recent observational estimates of the DMFs at $z\le2$ rule out the contraction of the DM haloes predicted by the TNG model.
  • We analyze scaling relations and evolution histories of galaxy sizes in TNG100, part of the IllustrisTNG simulation suite. Observational qualitative trends of size with stellar mass, star-formation rate and redshift are reproduced, and a quantitative comparison of projected r-band sizes at 0~<z<~2 shows agreement to much better than 0.25dex. We follow populations of z=0 galaxies with a range of masses backwards in time along their main progenitor branches, distinguishing between main-sequence and quenched galaxies. Our main findings are as follows. (i) At M_{*,z=0}>~10^{9.5}Msun, the evolution of the median main progenitor differs, with quenched galaxies hardly growing in median size before quenching, whereas main-sequence galaxies grow their median size continuously, thus opening a gap from the progenitors of quenched galaxies. This is partly because the main-sequence high-redshift progenitors of quenched z=0 galaxies are drawn from the lower end of the size distribution of the overall population of main-sequence high-redshift galaxies. (ii) Quenched galaxies with M_{*,z=0}>~10^{9.5}Msun experience a steep size growth on the size-mass plane after their quenching time, but with the exception of galaxies with M_{*,z=0}>~10^{11}Msun, the size growth after quenching is small in absolute terms, such that most of the size (and mass) growth of quenched galaxies (and its variation among them) occurs while they are still on the main-sequence. After they become quenched, the size growth rate of quenched galaxies as a function of time, as opposed to versus mass, is similar to that of main-sequence galaxies. Hence, the size gap is retained down to z=0.
  • The distribution of metals in the intra-cluster medium encodes important information about the enrichment history and formation of galaxy clusters. Here we explore the metal content of clusters in IllustrisTNG - a new suite of galaxy formation simulations building on the Illustris project. Our cluster sample contains 20 objects in TNG100 - a ~(100 Mpc)^3 volume simulation with 2x1820^3 resolution elements, and 370 objects in TNG300 - a ~(300 Mpc)^3 volume simulation with 2x2500^3 resolution elements. The z=0 metallicity profiles agree with observations, and the enrichment history is consistent with observational data going beyond z~1, showing nearly no metallicity evolution. The abundance profiles vary only minimally within the cluster samples, especially in the outskirts with a relative scatter of ~15%. The average metallicity profile flattens towards the center, where we find a logarithmic slope of -0.1 compared to -0.5 in the outskirts. Cool core clusters have more centrally peaked metallicity profiles (~0.8 solar) compared to non-cool core systems (~0.5 solar), similar to observational trends. Si/Fe and O/Fe radial profiles follow positive gradients. The outer abundance profiles do not evolve below z~2, whereas the inner profiles flatten towards z=0. More than ~80% of the metals in the intra-cluster medium have been accreted from the proto-cluster environment, which has been enriched to ~0.1 solar already at z~2. We conclude that the intra-cluster metal distribution is uniform among our cluster sample, nearly time-invariant in the outskirts for more than 10 Gyr, and forms through a universal enrichment history.
  • We study the population of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their effects on massive central galaxies in the IllustrisTNG cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation. The employed model for SMBH growth and feedback assumes a two-mode scenario in which the feedback from active galactic nuclei occurs through a kinetic, comparatively efficient mode at low accretion rates relative to the Eddington limit, and in the form of a thermal, less efficient mode at high accretion rates. We show that the quenching of massive central galaxies happens coincidently with kinetic-mode feedback, consistent with the notion that active supermassive black cause the low specific star formation rates observed in massive galaxies. However, major galaxy mergers are not responsible for initiating most of the quenching events in our model. Up to black hole masses of about $10^{8.5}\,{\rm M}_\odot$, the dominant growth channel for SMBHs is in the thermal mode. Higher mass black holes stay mainly in the kinetic mode and gas accretion is self-regulated via their feedback, which causes their Eddington ratios to drop, with SMBH mergers becoming the main channel for residual mass growth. As a consequence, the quasar luminosity function is dominated by rapidly accreting, moderately massive black holes in the thermal mode. We show that the associated growth history of SMBHs produces a low-redshift quasar luminosity function and a redshift zero black hole mass-stellar bulge mass relation in good agreement with observations, whereas the simulation tends to over-predict the high-redshift quasar luminosity function.
  • Early-type galaxies provide unique tests for the predictions of the cold dark matter cosmology and the baryonic physics assumptions entering models for galaxy formation. In this work, we use the Illustris simulation to study correlations of three main properties of early-type galaxies, namely, the stellar orbital anisotropies, the central dark matter fractions and the central radial density slopes, as well as their redshift evolution since $z=1.0$. We find that lower-mass galaxies or galaxies at higher redshift tend to be bluer in rest-frame colour, have higher central gas fractions, and feature more tangentially anisotropic orbits and steeper central density slopes than their higher-mass or lower-redshift counterparts, respectively. The projected central dark matter fraction within the effective radius shows a very mild mass dependence but positively correlates with galaxy effective radii due to the aperture effect. The central density slopes obtained by combining strong lensing measurements with single aperture kinematics are found to differ from the true density slopes. We identify systematic biases in this measurement to be due to two common modelling assumptions, isotropic stellar orbital distributions and power-law density profiles. We also compare the properties of early-type galaxies in Illustris to those from existing galaxy and strong lensing surveys, we find in general broad agreement but also some tension, which poses a potential challenge to the stellar formation and feedback models adopted by the simulation.
  • A power-law density model, i.e., $\rho(r) \propto r^{-\gamma'}$ has been commonly employed in strong gravitational lensing studies, including the so-called time-delay technique used to infer the Hubble constant $H_0$. However, since the radial scale at which strong lensing features are formed corresponds to the transition from the dominance of baryonic matter to dark matter, there is no known reason why galaxies should follow a power law in density. The assumption of a power law artificially breaks the mass-sheet degeneracy, a well-known invariance transformation in gravitational lensing which affects the product of Hubble constant and time delay and can therefore cause a bias in the determination of $H_0$ from the time-delay technique. In this paper, we use the Illustris hydrodynamical simulations to estimate the amplitude of this bias, and to understand how it is related to observational properties of galaxies. Investigating a large sample of Illustris galaxies that have velocity dispersion $\sigma_{SIE}$>160 km/s at redshifts below $z=1$, we find that the bias on $H_0$ introduced by the power-law assumption can reach 20%-50%, with a scatter of $10\%-30\%$ (rms). However, we find that by selecting galaxies with an inferred power-law model slope close to isothermal, it is possible to reduce the bias on $H_0$ to <5%, and the scatter to <10%. This could potentially be used to form less biased statistical samples for $H_0$ measurements in the upcoming large survey era.
  • We use the latest version of the metal line absorption catalogue of Zhu & M\'enard (2013) to study the clustering of MgII absorbers around massive galaxies (~10^11.5 M_sun), quasars and radio-loud AGN with redshifts between 0.4 and 0.75. Clustering is evaluated in two dimensions, by binning absorbers both in projected radius and in velocity separation. Excess MgII is detected around massive galaxies out to R_p=20 Mpc. At projected radii less than 800 kpc, the excess extends out to velocity separations of 10,000 km/s. The extent of the high velocity tail within this radius is independent of the mean stellar age of the galaxy and whether or not it harbours an active galactic nucleus. We interpret our results using the publicly available Illustris and Millennium simulations. Models where the MgII absorbers trace the dark matter particle or subhalo distributions do not fit the data. They overpredict the clustering on small scales and do not reproduce the excess high velocity separation MgII absorbers seen within the virial radius of the halo. The Illustris simulations which include thermal, but not mechanical feedback from AGN, also do not provide an adequate fit to the properties of the cool halo gas within the virial radius. We propose that the large velocity separation MgII absorbers trace gas that has been pushed out of the dark matter halos, possibly by multiple episodes of AGN-driven mechanical feedback acting over long timescales.
  • We introduce an updated physical model to simulate the formation and evolution of galaxies in cosmological, large-scale gravity+magnetohydrodynamical simulations with the moving mesh code AREPO. The overall framework builds upon the successes of the Illustris galaxy formation model, and includes prescriptions for star formation, stellar evolution, chemical enrichment, primordial and metal-line cooling of the gas, stellar feedback with galactic outflows, and black hole formation, growth and multi-mode feedback. In this paper we give a comprehensive description of the physical and numerical advances which form the core of the IllustrisTNG (The Next Generation) framework. We focus on the revised implementation of the galactic winds, of which we modify the directionality, velocity, thermal content, and energy scalings, and explore its effects on the galaxy population. As described in earlier works, the model also includes a new black hole driven kinetic feedback at low accretion rates and magnetohydrodynamics. Using a suite of (25 Mpc $h^{-1}$)$^3$ cosmological boxes we assess the outcome of the new model at our fiducial resolution. The presence of a self-consistently amplified magnetic field is shown to have an important impact on the stellar content of $10^{12} M_{\rm sun}$ haloes and above. Finally, we demonstrate that the new galactic winds promise to solve key problems identified in Illustris and affecting the stellar content and sizes of the low mass end of the galaxy population.
  • The inefficiency of star formation in massive elliptical galaxies is widely believed to be caused by the interactions of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the surrounding gas. Achieving a sufficiently rapid reddening of moderately massive galaxies without expelling too many baryons has however proven difficult for hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, prompting us to explore a new model for the accretion and feedback effects of supermassive black holes. For high accretion rates relative to the Eddington limit, we assume that a fraction of the accreted rest mass energy heats the surrounding gas thermally, similar to the `quasar mode' in previous work. For low accretion rates, we invoke a new, pure kinetic feedback model which imparts momentum into the surrounding gas in a stochastic manner. These two modes of feedback are motivated both by theoretical conjectures for the existence of different types of accretion flows as well as recent observational evidence for the importance of kinetic AGN winds in quenching galaxies. We find that a large fraction of the injected kinetic energy in this mode thermalises via shocks in the surrounding gas, thereby providing a distributed heating channel. In cosmological simulations, the resulting model produces red, non star-forming massive elliptical galaxies, and achieves realistic gas fractions, black hole growth histories and thermodynamic profiles in large haloes.
  • Mergers and the spin of the dark matter halo are factors traditionally believed to determine the morphology of galaxies within a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. We study this hypothesis by considering approximately 18,000 central galaxies at $z=0$ with stellar masses $M_{\ast} = 10^{9}-10^{12} \, {\rm M}_{\odot}$ selected from the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. The fraction of accreted stars -- which measures the importance of massive, recent and dry mergers -- increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass, from less than 5 per cent in dwarfs to 80 per cent in the most massive objects, and the impact of mergers on galaxy morphology increases accordingly. For galaxies with $M_{\ast} \gtrsim 10^{11} \, {\rm M}_{\odot}$, mergers have the expected effect: if gas-poor they promote the formation of spheroidal galaxies, whereas gas-rich mergers favour the formation and survivability of massive discs. This trend, however, breaks at lower masses. For objects with $M_{\ast} \lesssim 10^{11} \, {\rm M}_{\odot}$, mergers do not seem to play any significant role in determining the morphology, with accreted stellar fractions and mean merger gas fractions that are indistinguishable between spheroidal and disc-dominated galaxies. On the other hand, halo spin correlates with morphology primarily in the least massive objects in the sample ($M_{\ast} \lesssim 10^{10} \, {\rm M}_{\odot}$), but only weakly for galaxies above that mass. Our results support a scenario where (1) mergers play a dominant role in shaping the morphology of massive galaxies, (2) halo spin is important for the morphology of dwarfs, and (3) the morphology of medium-sized galaxies -- including the Milky Way -- shows little dependence on galaxy assembly history or halo spin, at least when these two factors are considered individually.
  • We use the Illustris simulation to study the relative contributions of in situ star formation and stellar accretion to the build-up of galaxies over an unprecedentedly wide range of masses ($M_{\ast} = 10^9-10^{12} \, {\rm M_{\odot}}$), galaxy types, environments, and assembly histories. We find that the `two-phase' picture of galaxy formation predicted by some models is a good approximation only for the most massive galaxies in our simulation -- namely, the stellar mass growth of galaxies below a few times $10^{11} \, {\rm M_{\odot}}$ is dominated by in situ star formation at all redshifts. The fraction of the total stellar mass of galaxies at $z=0$ contributed by accreted stars shows a strong dependence on galaxy stellar mass, ranging from about 10 per cent for Milky Way-sized galaxies to over 80 per cent for $M_{\ast} \approx 10^{12} \, {\rm M_{\odot}}$ objects, yet with a large galaxy-to-galaxy variation. At a fixed stellar mass, elliptical galaxies and those formed at the centres of younger haloes exhibit larger fractions of ex situ stars than disc-like galaxies and those formed in older haloes. On average, $\sim$50 per cent of the ex situ stellar mass comes from major mergers (stellar mass ratio $\mu > 1/4$), $\sim$20 per cent from minor mergers ($1/10 < \mu < 1/4$), $\sim$20 per cent from very minor mergers ($\mu < 1/10$), and $\sim$10 per cent from stars that were stripped from surviving galaxies (e.g. flybys or ongoing mergers). These components are spatially segregated, with in situ stars dominating the innermost regions of galaxies, and ex situ stars being deposited at larger galactocentric distances in order of decreasing merger mass ratio.
  • We analyze the properties of the circumgalactic gas (CGM) around 120 galaxies with stellar and dark matter halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way. We focus on the morphology and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen and how this depends on f_g, the ratio of gas-to-stellar mass within the optical radius. In gas-rich galaxies with f_g > 0.1, gas temperatures rise slowly from center of the halo out to the virial radius and average neutral gas column densities remain above 10^19 atoms cm^-2 out to radii of 50-70 kpc. In gas-poor galaxies with f_g < 0.1, gas temperatures rise quickly outside the edge of the disk to 10^6 K, and then remain fixed out to radii of 100 kpc. The column density of neutral gas quickly drops below 10^19 atoms cm^-2 at radii of 10 kpc. Neutral gas distributions are also more asymmetric in gas-poor galaxies. Most of the differences between gas-poor and gas-rich galaxies in the Illustris simulation can be attributed to the effects of "radio-mode" AGN feedback. In the Illustris simulation, the circumgalactic gas is found to rotate coherently about the center of the galaxy with a maximum rotational velocity of around 200 km/s. In gas-rich galaxies, the average coherence length of the rotating gas is 40 kpc, compared to 10 kpc in gas-poor galaxies. In the very most gas-rich systems, the CGM can rotate coherently over scales of 70-100 kpc. We discuss our results in the context of recent observations of the CGM in low mass galaxies via UV absorption-line spectroscopy and deep 21cm observations of edge-on spiral galaxies.
  • Hydrodynamical shocks are a manifestation of the non-linearity of the Euler equations and play a fundamental role in cosmological gas dynamics. In this work, we identify and analyse shocks in the Illustris simulation, and contrast the results with those of non-radiative runs. We show that simulations with more comprehensive physical models of galaxy formation pose new challenges for shock finding algorithms due to radiative cooling and star-forming processes, prompting us to develop a number of methodology improvements. We find in Illustris a total shock surface area which is about 1.4 times larger at the present epoch compared to non-radiative runs, and an energy dissipation rate at shocks which is higher by a factor of around 7. Remarkably, shocks with Mach numbers above and below $\mathcal{M}\approx10$ contribute about equally to the total dissipation across cosmic time. This is in sharp contrast to non-radiative simulations, and we demonstrate that a large part of the difference arises due to strong black hole radio-mode feedback in Illustris. We also provide an overview of the large diversity of shock morphologies, which includes complex networks of halo-internal shocks, shocks on to cosmic sheets, feedback shocks due to black holes and galactic winds, as well as ubiquitous accretion shocks. In high redshift systems more massive than $10^{12}\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$ we discover the existence of a double accretion shock pattern in haloes. They are created when gas streams along filaments without being shocked at the outer accretion shock, but then forms a second, roughly spherical accretion shock further inside.
  • Supermassive black hole (BH) mergers produce powerful gravitational wave (GW) emission. Asymmetry in this emission imparts a recoil kick to the merged BH, which can eject the BH from its host galaxy altogether. Recoiling BHs could be observed as offset active galactic nuclei (AGN). Several candidates have been identified, but systematic searches have been hampered by large uncertainties regarding their observability. By extracting merging BHs and host galaxy properties from the Illustris cosmological simulations, we have developed a comprehensive model for recoiling AGN. Here, for the first time, we model the effects of BH spin alignment and recoil dynamics based on the gas-richness of host galaxies. We predict that if BH spins are not highly aligned, seeing-limited observations could resolve offset AGN, making them promising targets for all-sky surveys. For randomly-oriented spins, less than about 10 spatially-offset AGN may be detectable in HST-COSMOS, and > 10^3 could be found with Pan-STARRS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. Nearly a thousand velocity-offset AGN are predicted within the SDSS footprint; the rarity of large broad-line offsets among SDSS quasars is likely due in part to selection effects but suggests that spin alignment plays a role in suppressing recoils. Nonetheless, in our most physically motivated model where alignment occurs only in gas-rich mergers, hundreds of offset AGN should be found in all-sky surveys. Our findings strongly motivate a dedicated search for recoiling AGN.
  • Massive quiescent galaxies have much smaller physical sizes at high redshift than today. The strong evolution of galaxy size may be caused by progenitor bias, major and minor mergers, adiabatic expansion, and/or renewed star formation, but it is difficult to test these theories observationally. Herein, we select a sample of 35 massive, compact galaxies ($M_* = 1-3 \times 10^{11}$ M$_\odot$, $M_*/R^{1.5} > 10^{10.5}$ M$_\odot$/kpc$^{1.5}$) at $z=2$ in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Illustris and trace them forward to $z=0$ to uncover their evolution and identify their descendants. By $z=0$, the original factor of 3 difference in stellar mass spreads to a factor of 20. The dark matter halo masses similarly spread from a factor of 5 to 40. The galaxies' evolutionary paths are diverse: about half acquire an ex-situ envelope and are the core of a more massive descendant, a third survive undisturbed and gain very little mass, 15% are consumed in a merger with a more massive galaxy, and a small remainder are thoroughly mixed by major mergers. The galaxies grow in size as well as mass, and only $\sim$10% remain compact by $z=0$. The majority of the size growth is driven by the acquisition of ex-situ mass. The most massive galaxies at $z=0$ are the most likely to have compact progenitors, but this trend possesses significant dispersion which precludes a direct linkage to compact galaxies at $z=2$. The compact galaxies' merger rates are influenced by their $z=2$ environments, so that isolated or satellite compact galaxies (which are protected from mergers) are the most likely to survive to the present day.
  • Galaxy clusters contain a large population of low mass dwarf elliptical galaxies whose exact origin is unclear: their colors, structural properties and kinematics differ substantially from those of dwarf irregulars in the field. We use the Illustris cosmological simulation to study differences in the assembly paths of dwarf galaxies (3e8 < M_*/M_sun < 1e10) according to their environment. We find that cluster dwarfs achieve their maximum total and stellar mass on average ~ 8 and ~ 4.5 Gyr ago (or redshifts z = 1.0 and z = 0.4, respectively), around the time of infall into the clusters. In contrast, field dwarfs not subjected to environmental stripping, reach their maximum mass at redshift z = 0. This different assembly history naturally produces a color bimodality, with blue isolated dwarfs and redder cluster dwarfs exhibiting negligible star-formation today. The cessation of star formation happens over median times 3.5-5 Gyr depending on stellar mass, and shows a large scatter (~ 1-8 Gyr), with the lower values associated with starburst events that occur at infall through the virial radius or pericentric passages. We argue that such starbursts together with the early assembly of cluster dwarfs can provide a natural explanation for the higher specific frequency of globular clusters (GCs) in cluster dwarfs, as found observationally. We present a simple model for the formation and stripping of GCs that supports this interpretation. The origin of dwarf ellipticals in clusters is, therefore, consistent with an environmentally-driven evolution of field dwarf irregulars. However the z = 0 field analogs of cluster dwarf progenitors have today stellar masses a factor ~ 3 larger --a difference arising from the early truncation of star formation in cluster dwarfs.
  • We present the full public release of all data from the Illustris simulation project. Illustris is a suite of large volume, cosmological hydrodynamical simulations run with the moving-mesh code Arepo and including a comprehensive set of physical models critical for following the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Each simulates a volume of (106.5 Mpc)^3 and self-consistently evolves five different types of resolution elements from a starting redshift of z=127 to the present day, z=0. These components are: dark matter particles, gas cells, passive gas tracers, stars and stellar wind particles, and supermassive black holes. This data release includes the snapshots at all 136 available redshifts, halo and subhalo catalogs at each snapshot, and two distinct merger trees. Six primary realizations of the Illustris volume are released, including the flagship Illustris-1 run. These include three resolution levels with the fiducial "full" baryonic physics model, and a dark matter only analog for each. In addition, we provide four distinct, high time resolution, smaller volume "subboxes". The total data volume is ~265 TB, including ~800 full volume snapshots and ~30,000 subbox snapshots. We describe the released data products as well as tools we have developed for their analysis. All data may be directly downloaded in its native HDF5 format. Additionally, we release a comprehensive, web-based API which allows programmatic access to search and data processing tasks. In both cases we provide example scripts and a getting-started guide in several languages: currently, IDL, Python, and Matlab. This paper addresses scientific issues relevant for the interpretation of the simulations, serves as a pointer to published and on-line documentation of the project, describes planned future additional data releases, and discusses technical aspects of the release.
  • We study how optical galaxy morphology depends on mass and star formation rate (SFR) in the Illustris Simulation. To do so, we measure automated galaxy structures in 10808 simulated galaxies at z=0 with stellar masses 10^9.7 < M_*/M_sun < 10^12.3. We add observational realism to idealized synthetic images and measure non-parametric statistics in rest-frame optical and near-IR images from four directions. We find that Illustris creates a morphologically diverse galaxy population, occupying the observed bulge strength locus and reproducing median morphology trends versus stellar mass, SFR, and compactness. Morphology correlates realistically with rotation, following classification schemes put forth by kinematic surveys. Type fractions as a function of environment agree roughly with data. These results imply that connections among mass, star formation, and galaxy structure arise naturally from models matching global star formation and halo occupation functions when simulated with accurate methods. This raises a question of how to construct experiments on galaxy surveys to better distinguish between models. We predict that at fixed halo mass near 10^12 M_sun, disc-dominated galaxies have higher stellar mass than bulge-dominated ones, a possible consequence of the Illustris feedback model. While Illustris galaxies at M_* ~ 10^11 M_sun have a reasonable size distribution, those at M_* ~ 10^10 M_sun have half-light radii larger than observed by a factor of two. Furthermore, at M_* ~ 10^10.5-10^11 M_sun, a relevant fraction of Illustris galaxies have distinct "ring-like" features, such that the bright pixels have an unusually wide spatial extent.
  • Comparisons between observational surveys and galaxy formation models find that the mass of dark matter haloes can largely explain galaxies' stellar mass. However, it remains uncertain whether additional environmental variables, generally referred to as assembly bias, are necessary to explain other galaxy properties. We use the Illustris Simulation to investigate the role of assembly bias in producing galactic conformity by considering 18,000 galaxies with $M_{stellar}$ > $2 \times 10^9$ $M_{\odot}$. We find a significant signal of galactic conformity: out to distances of about 10 Mpc, the mean red fraction of galaxies around redder galaxies is higher than around bluer galaxies at fixed stellar mass. Dark matter haloes exhibit an analogous conformity signal, in which the fraction of haloes formed at earlier times (old haloes) is higher around old haloes than around younger ones at fixed halo mass. A plausible interpretation of galactic conformity can be given as a combination of the halo conformity signal with the galaxy color-halo age relation: at fixed stellar mass, particularly toward the low-mass end, Illustris' galaxy colors correlate with halo age, with the reddest galaxies (often satellites) being preferentially found in the oldest haloes. In fact, we can explain the galactic conformity effect with a simple semi-empirical model, by assigning stellar mass based on halo mass (abundance matching) and by assigning galaxy color based on halo age (age matching). We investigate other interpretations for the galactic conformity, particularly its dependence on the isolation criterion and on the central-satellite information. Regarding comparison to observations, we conclude that the adopted selection/isolation criteria, projection effects, and stacking techniques can have a significant impact on the measured amplitude of the conformity signal.