• The recent discovery of the electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational wave source GW170817, has demonstrated the huge informative power of multi-messenger observations. During the next decade the nascent field of multi-messenger astronomy will mature significantly. Around 2030, third generation gravitational wave detectors will be roughly ten times more sensitive than the current ones. At the same time, neutrino detectors currently upgrading to multi km^3 telescopes, will include a 10 km^3 facility in the Southern hemisphere that is expected to be operational around 2030. In this review, we describe the most promising high frequency gravitational wave and neutrino sources that will be detected in the next two decades. In this context, we show the important role of the Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (THESEUS), a mission concept proposed to ESA by a large international collaboration in response to the call for the Cosmic Vision Programme M5 missions. THESEUS aims at providing a substantial advancement in early Universe science as well as playing a fundamental role in multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics, operating in strong synergy with future gravitational wave and neutrino detectors as well as major ground- and space-based telescopes. This review is an extension of the THESEUS white paper (Amati et al. 2017), also in light of the discovery of GW170817/GRB170817A that was announced on October 16th, 2017.
  • L. Amati, P. O'Brien, D. Goetz, E. Bozzo, C. Tenzer, F. Frontera, G. Ghirlanda, C. Labanti, J. P. Osborne, G. Stratta, N. Tanvir, R. Willingale, P. Attina, R. Campana, A.J. Castro-Tirado, C. Contini, F. Fuschino, A. Gomboc, R. Hudec, P. Orleanski, E. Renotte, T. Rodic, Z. Bagoly, A. Blain, P. Callanan, S. Covino, A. Ferrara, E. Le Floch, M. Marisaldi, S. Mereghetti, P. Rosati, A. Vacchi, P. D'Avanzo, P. Giommi, A. Gomboc, S. Piranomonte, L. Piro, V. Reglero, A. Rossi, A. Santangelo, R. Salvaterra, G. Tagliaferri, S. Vergani, S. Vinciguerra, M. Briggs, E. Campolongo, R. Ciolfi, V. Connaughton, B. Cordier, B. Morelli, M. Orlandini, C. Adami, A. Argan, J.-L. Atteia, N. Auricchio, L. Balazs, G. Baldazzi, S. Basa, R. Basak, P. Bellutti, M. G. Bernardini, G. Bertuccio, J. Braga, M. Branchesi, S. Brandt, E. Brocato, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, A. Bulgarelli, L. Burderi, J. Camp, S. Capozziello, J. Caruana, P. Casella, B. Cenko, P. Chardonnet, B. Ciardi, S. Colafrancesco, M. G. Dainotti, V. D'Elia, D. De Martino, M. De Pasquale, E. Del Monte, M. Della Valle, A. Drago, Y. Evangelista, M. Feroci, F. Finelli, M. Fiorini, J. Fynbo, A. Gal-Yam, B. Gendre, G. Ghisellini, A. Grado, C. Guidorzi, M. Hafizi, L. Hanlon, J. Hjorth, L. Izzo, L. Kiss, P. Kumar, I. Kuvvetli, M. Lavagna, T. Li, F. Longo, M. Lyutikov, U. Maio, E. Maiorano, P. Malcovati, D. Malesani, R. Margutti, A. Martin-Carrillo, N. Masetti, S. McBreen, R. Mignani, G. Morgante, C. Mundell, H. U. Nargaard-Nielsen, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, S. Paltani, F. Panessa, G. Pareschi, A. Pe'er, A. V. Penacchioni, E. Pian, E. Piedipalumbo, T. Piran, G. Rauw, M. Razzano, A. Read, L. Rezzolla, P. Romano, R. Ruffini, S. Savaglio, V. Sguera, P. Schady, W. Skidmore, L. Song, E. Stanway, R. Starling, M. Topinka, E. Troja, M. van Putten, E. Vanzella, S. Vercellone, C. Wilson-Hodge, D. Yonetoku, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, B. Zhang, B. B. Zhang, S. Zhang, S.-N. Zhang, A. Antonelli, F. Bianco, S. Boci, M. Boer, M. T. Botticella, O. Boulade, C. Butler, S. Campana, F. Capitanio, A. Celotti, Y. Chen, M. Colpi, A. Comastri, J.-G. Cuby, M. Dadina, A. De Luca, Y.-W. Dong, S. Ettori, P. Gandhi, E. Geza, J. Greiner, S. Guiriec, J. Harms, M. Hernanz, A. Hornstrup, I. Hutchinson, G. Israel, P. Jonker, Y. Kaneko, N. Kawai, K. Wiersema, S. Korpela, V. Lebrun, F. Lu, A. MacFadyen, G. Malaguti, L. Maraschi, A. Melandri, M. Modjaz, D. Morris, N. Omodei, A. Paizis, P. Pata, V. Petrosian, A. Rachevski, J. Rhoads, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, N. Shigehiro, M. Sims, J. Soomin, D. Szecsi, Y. Urata, M. Uslenghi, L. Valenziano, G. Vianello, S. Vojtech, D. Watson, J. Zicha
    March 27, 2018 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    THESEUS is a space mission concept aimed at exploiting Gamma-Ray Bursts for investigating the early Universe and at providing a substantial advancement of multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics. These goals will be achieved through a unique combination of instruments allowing GRB and X-ray transient detection over a broad field of view (more than 1sr) with 0.5-1 arcmin localization, an energy band extending from several MeV down to 0.3 keV and high sensitivity to transient sources in the soft X-ray domain, as well as on-board prompt (few minutes) follow-up with a 0.7 m class IR telescope with both imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. THESEUS will be perfectly suited for addressing the main open issues in cosmology such as, e.g., star formation rate and metallicity evolution of the inter-stellar and intra-galactic medium up to redshift $\sim$10, signatures of Pop III stars, sources and physics of re-ionization, and the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, it will provide unprecedented capability to monitor the X-ray variable sky, thus detecting, localizing, and identifying the electromagnetic counterparts to sources of gravitational radiation, which may be routinely detected in the late '20s / early '30s by next generation facilities like aLIGO/ aVirgo, eLISA, KAGRA, and Einstein Telescope. THESEUS will also provide powerful synergies with the next generation of multi-wavelength observatories (e.g., LSST, ELT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA).
  • We report on the results of the multiwavelength campaign carried out after the discovery of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17329-2731. The optical data collected with the SOAR telescope allowed us to identify the donor star in this system as a late M giant at a distance of 2.7$^{+3.4}_{-1.2}$ kpc. The data collected quasi-simultaneously with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR showed the presence of a modulation with a period of 6680$\pm$3 s in the X-ray light curves of the source. This unveils that the compact object hosted in this system is a slowly rotating neutron star. The broadband X-ray spectrum showed the presence of a strong absorption ($\gg$10$^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$) and prominent emission lines at 6.4 keV, and 7.1 keV. These features are usually found in wind-fed systems, in which the emission lines result from the fluorescence of the X-rays from the accreting compact object on the surrounding stellar wind. The presence of a strong absorption line around $\sim$21 keV in the NuSTAR spectrum suggests a cyclotron origin, thus allowing us to estimate the neutron star magnetic field as $\sim$2.4$\times$10$^{12}$ G. All evidence thus suggests IGR J17329-2731 is a symbiotic X-ray binary. As no X-ray emission was ever observed from the location of IGR J17329-2731 by INTEGRAL (or other X-ray facilities) during the past 15 yr in orbit and considering that symbiotic X-ray binaries are known to be variable but persistent X-ray sources, we concluded that INTEGRAL caught the first detectable X-ray emission from IGR J17329-2731 when the source shined as a symbiotic X-ray binary. The Swift/XRT monitoring performed up to $\sim$3 months after the discovery of the source, showed that it maintained a relatively stable X-ray flux and spectral properties.
  • AX J0049.4-7323 is a Be/X-ray binary in the Small Magellanic Cloud hosting a ~750 s pulsar which has been observed over the last ~17 years by several X-ray telescopes. Despite numerous observations, little is known about its X-ray behaviour. Therefore, we coherently analysed archival Swift, Chandra, XMM-Newton, RXTE, and INTEGRAL data, and we compared them with already published ASCA data, to study its X-ray long-term spectral and flux variability. AX J0049.4-7323 shows a high X-ray variability, spanning more than three orders of magnitudes, from L ~ 1.6E37 erg/s (0.3-8 keV, d=62 kpc) down to L ~ 8E33 erg/s. RXTE, Chandra, Swift, and ASCA observed, in addition to the expected enhancement of X-ray luminosity at periastron, flux variations by a factor of ~ 270 with peak luminosities of ~2.1E36 erg/s far from periastron. These properties are difficult to reconcile with the typical long-term variability of Be/XRBs, traditionally interpreted in terms of type I and type II outbursts. The study of AX J0049.4-7323 is complemented with a spectral analysis of Swift, Chandra, and XMM-Newton data which showed a softening trend when the emission becomes fainter, and an analysis of optical/UV data collected by the UVOT telescope on board Swift. In addition, we measured a secular spin-up rate of $\dot{P}=(-3.00\pm0.12)\times 10^{-3}$ s day$^{-1}$, which suggests that the pulsar has not yet achieved its equilibrium period. Assuming spherical accretion, we estimated an upper limit for the magnetic field strength of the pulsar of ~3E12 G.
  • The Transient High-Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (THESEUS) is a mission concept developed in the last years by a large European consortium, with interest in prospective participation by research groups in USA and other non-European countries. As detailed in Amati et al. 2017 (arXiv:1710.04638) and Stratta et al. 2017 (arXiv:1712.08153), THESEUS aims at exploiting high-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts for getting unique clues on the early Universe and, being an unprecedentedly powerful machine for the detection, accurate location and redshift determination of all types of GRBs (long, short, high-z, under-luminous, ultra-long) and many other classes of transient sources and phenomena, at providing a substantial contribution to multi-messenger astrophysics and time-domain astronomy. Under these respects, THESEUS will show a beautiful synergy with the large observing facilities of the future, like E-ELT, TMT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA, in the electromagnetic domain, as well as with next-generation gravitational-waves and neutrino detectors, thus enhancing importantly their scientific return. Moreover, it will also operate as a flexible IR and X-ray observatory, thus providing an even larger involvement of the scientific community, as is currently the case for the Swift mission. In order to further explore the magnificent prospective science of the mission, the THESEUS consortium organized a Workshop in Naples on October 5-6 2017. The programme included about 50 reviews and talks from worldwide recognized experts of the fields. The topics ranged from the description of the mission concept, instrumentation and technologies to the main, additional and observatory science, further showing the strong impact that THESEUS observations would have on several fields of astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics.
  • We summarize in this contribution the capabilities, design status, and the en- abling technologies of the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) planned to be on-board the THESEUS mission. We describe its central role in making THESEUS a powerful machine to probe the physical conditions of the early Universe (close to the reionization era) and to explore the time-domain Universe.
  • The Infra-Red Telescope (IRT) on board the Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (THESEUS) ESA M5 candidate mission will play a key role in identifying and characterizing moderate to high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts afterglows. The IRT is the enabling instrument on board THESEUS for measuring autonomously the redshift of the several hundreds of GRBs detected per year by the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) and the X- and Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (XGIS), and thus allowing the big ground based telescopes to be triggered on a redshift pre-selected sample, and finally fulfilling the cosmological goals of the mission. The IRT will be composed by a primary mirror of 0.7 m of diameter coupled to a single camera in a Cassegrain design. It will work in the 0.7-1.8 {\mu}m wavelength range, and will provide a 10x10 arc min imaging field of view with sub-arc second localization capabilities, and, at the same time, a 5x5 arc min field of view with moderate (R up to ~500) spectroscopic capabilities. Its sensitivity, mainly limited by the satellite jitter, is adapted to detect all the GRBs, localized by the SXI/XGIS, and to acquire spectra for the majority of them.
  • We will discuss the observing strategy of the Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (THESEUS) mission proposed to ESA as a response to the M5 call for proposals. The description of THESEUS and its science goals can be found in the white paper by Amati et al. (2017).
  • We report the discovery of X-ray pulsations at 105.2 Hz (9.5 ms) from the transient X-ray binary IGR J16597-3704 using NuSTAR and Swift. The source was discovered by INTEGRAL in the globular cluster NGC 6256 at a distance of 9.1 kpc. The X-ray pulsations show a clear Doppler modulation implying an orbital period of ~46 minutes and a projected semi-major axis of ~5 lt-ms, which makes IGR J16597-3704 an ultra-compact X-ray binary system. We estimated a minimum companion mass of 0.0065 solar masses, assuming a neutron star mass of 1.4 solar masses, and an inclination angle of <75 degrees (suggested by the absence of eclipses or dips in its light-curve). The broad-band energy spectrum of the source is well described by a disk blackbody component (kT ~1.4 keV) plus a comptonised power-law with photon index ~2.3 and an electron temperature of ~30 keV. Radio pulsations from the source were searched for with the Parkes observatory and not detected.
  • We report the e INTernational Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) detection of the short gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A (discovered by Fermi-GBM) with a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.6, and, for the first time, its association with the gravitational waves (GWs) from binary neutron star (BNS) merging event GW170817 detected by the LIGO and Virgo observatories. The significance of association between the gamma-ray burst observed by INTEGRAL and GW170817 is 3.2 $\sigma$, while the association between the Fermi-GBM and INTEGRAL detections is 4.2 $\sigma$. GRB 170817A was detected by the SPI-ACS instrument about 2 s after the end of the gravitational wave event. We measure a fluence of $(1.4 \pm 0.4 \pm 0.6) \times$10$^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2})$ (75--2000 keV), where, respectively, the statistical error is given at the 1 $\sigma$ confidence level, and the systematic error corresponds to the uncertainty in the spectral model and instrument response. We also report on the pointed follow-up observations carried out by INTEGRAL, starting 19.5 h after the event, and lasting for 5.4 days. We provide a stringent upper limit on any electromagnetic signal in a very broad energy range, from 3 keV to 8 MeV, constraining the soft gamma-ray afterglow flux to $<7.1\times$10$^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (80--300 keV). Exploiting the unique capabilities of INTEGRAL, we constrained the gamma-ray line emission from radioactive decays that are expected to be the principal source of the energy behind a kilonova event following a BNS coalescence. Finally, we put a stringent upper limit on any delayed bursting activity, for example from a newly formed magnetar.
  • The long-term X-ray lightcurves of classical supergiant X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients show relatively similar super-orbital modulations, which are still lacking a sound interpretation. We propose that these modulations are related to the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) known to thread the winds of OB supergiants. To test this hypothesis, we couple the outcomes of 3-D hydrodynamic models for the formation of CIRs in stellar winds with a simplified recipe for the accretion onto a neutron star. The results show that the synthetic X-ray light curves are indeed modulated by the presence of the CIRs. The exact period and amplitude of these modulations depend on a number of parameters governing the hydrodynamic wind models and on the binary orbital configuration. To compare our model predictions with the observations, we apply the 3-D wind structure previously shown to well explain the appearance of discrete absorption components in the UV time series of a prototypical B0.5I-type supergiant. Using the orbital parameters of IGRJ16493-4348 which has the same B0.5I donor spectral type, the period and modulations in the simulated X-ray light-curve are similar to the observed ones, thus providing support to our scenario. We propose, that the presence of CIRs in donor star winds should be considered in future theoretical and simulation efforts of wind-fed X-ray binaries.
  • Whilst astronomy as a science is historically founded on observations at optical wavelengths, studying the Universe in other bands has yielded remarkable discoveries, from pulsars in the radio, signatures of the Big Bang at submm wavelengths, through to high energy emission from accreting, gravitationally-compact objects and the discovery of gamma-ray bursts. Unsurprisingly, the result of combining multiple wavebands leads to an enormous increase in diagnostic power, but powerful insights can be lost when the sources studied vary on timescales shorter than the temporal separation between observations in different bands. In July 2015, the workshop "Paving the way to simultaneous multi-wavelength astronomy" was held as a concerted effort to address this at the Lorentz Center, Leiden. It was attended by 50 astronomers from diverse fields as well as the directors and staff of observatories and spaced-based missions. This community white paper has been written with the goal of disseminating the findings of that workshop by providing a concise review of the field of multi-wavelength astronomy covering a wide range of important source classes, the problems associated with their study and the solutions we believe need to be implemented for the future of observational astronomy. We hope that this paper will both stimulate further discussion and raise overall awareness within the community of the issues faced in a developing, important field.
  • Double neutron star (DNS) systems represent extreme physical objects and the endpoint of an exotic journey of stellar evolution and binary interactions. Large numbers of DNS systems and their mergers are anticipated to be discovered using the Square-Kilometre-Array searching for radio pulsars and high-frequency gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO), respectively. Here we discuss all key properties of DNS systems, as well as selection effects, and combine the latest observational data with new theoretical progress on various physical processes with the aim of advancing our knowledge on their formation. We examine key interactions of their progenitor systems and evaluate their accretion history during the high-mass X-ray binary stage, the common envelope phase and the subsequent Case BB mass transfer, and argue that the first-formed NSs have accreted at most $\sim 0.02\;M_{\odot}$. We investigate DNS masses, spins and velocities, and in particular correlations between spin period, orbital period and eccentricity. Numerous Monte Carlo simulations of the second supernova (SN) events are performed to extrapolate pre-SN stellar properties and probe the explosions. All known close-orbit DNS systems are consistent with ultra-stripped exploding stars. Although their resulting NS kicks are often small, we demonstrate a large spread in kick magnitudes which may, in general, depend on the past interaction history of the exploding star and thus correlate with the NS mass. We analyze and discuss NS kick directions based on our SN simulations. Finally, we discuss the terminal evolution of close-orbit DNS systems until they merge and possibly produce a short $\gamma$-ray burst.
  • Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are characterized by a remarkable variability in the X-ray domain, widely ascribed to the accretion from a clumpy stellar wind. In this paper we performed a systematic and homogeneous analysis of sufficiently bright X-ray flares from the SFXTs observed with XMM-Newton to probe spectral variations on timescales as short as a few hundred of seconds. Our ultimate goal is to investigate if SFXT flares and outbursts are triggered by the presence of clumps and eventually reveal whether strongly or mildly dense clumps are required. For all sources, we employ a technique developed by our group, making use of an adaptive rebinned hardness ratio to optimally select the time intervals for the spectral extraction. A total of twelve observations performed in the direction of five SFXTs are reported. We show that both strongly and mildly dense clumps can trigger these events. In the former case, the local absorption column density may increase by a factor of >>3, while in the latter case, the increase is only by a factor of 2-3 (or lower). Overall, there seems to be no obvious correlation between the dynamic ranges in the X-ray fluxes and absorption column densities in SFXTs, with an indication that lower densities are recorded at the highest fluxes. This can be explained by the presence of accretion inhibition mechanism(s). We propose a classification of the flares/outbursts from these sources to drive future observational investigations. We suggest that the difference between the classes of flares/outbursts is related to the fact that the mechanism(s) inhibiting accretion can be overcome more easily in some sources compared to others. We also investigate the possibility that different stellar wind structures, rather than clumps, could provide the means to temporarily overcome the inhibition of accretion in SFXTs.
  • We used data from the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) to set upper-limits on the ${\gamma}$-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW170104, discovered by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. The unique omni-directional viewing capability of the instruments on-board INTEGRAL allowed us to examine the full 90% confidence level localization region of the LIGO trigger. Depending on the particular spectral model assumed and the specific position within this region, the upper limits inferred from the INTEGRAL observations range from F${\gamma}$=1.9x10-7 erg cm-2 to F${\gamma}$=10-6 erg cm-2 (75 keV - 2 MeV energy range). This translates into a ratio between the prompt energy released in ${\gamma}$-rays along the direction to the observer and the gravitational wave energy of E${\gamma}$/EGW <2.6x10-5 . Using the INTEGRAL results, we can not confirm the ${\gamma}$-ray proposed counterpart to GW170104 by the AGILE team with the MCAL instrument. The reported flux of the AGILE/MCAL event, E2, is not compatible with the INTEGRAL upper limits within most of the 90% LIGO localization region. There is only a relatively limited portion of the sky where the sensitivity of the INTEGRAL instruments was not optimal and the lowest allowed fluence estimated for E2 would still be compatible with the INTEGRAL results. This region was also observed independently by Fermi/GBM and AstroSAT, from which, as far as we are aware, there are no reports of any significant detection of a prompt high-energy event.
  • In search for the counterpart to the Fermi-LAT source 3FGL J0838.8-2829, we performed a multi-wavelength campaign, in the X-ray band with Swift and XMM-Newton, performed infrared, optical (with OAGH, ESO-NTT and IAC80) and radio (ATCA) observations, as well as analysed archival hard X-ray data taken by INTEGRAL. We report on three X-ray sources consistent with the position of the Fermi-LAT source. We confirm the identification of the brightest object, RX J0838-2827, as a magnetic cataclysmic variable, that we recognize as an asynchronous system (not associated with the Fermi-LAT source). RX J0838-2827, is extremely variable in the X-ray and optical bands, and timing analysis reveals the presence of several periodicities modulating its X-ray and optical emission. The most evident modulations are interpreted as due to the binary system orbital period of ~1.64h and the white dwarf spin period of ~1.47h. A strong flux modulation at ~15h is observed at all energy bands, consistent with the beat frequency between spin and orbital periods. Optical spectra show prominent Hbeta, HeI and HeII emission lines Doppler-modulated at the orbital period and at the beat period. Therefore, RX J0838-2827, accretes through a diskless configuration and could be either a strongly asynchronous polar or a rare example of a pre-polar system in its way to reach synchronism. Among the other two X-ray sources, XMM J083850.4-282759 showed a variable X-ray emission, with a powerful flare lasting ~600s, similar to what is observed in transitional millisecond pulsars during the sub-luminous disc state: that would possibly associate this source with the Fermi-LAT source.
  • IGR~J18245--2452/PSR J1824--2452I is one of the rare transitional accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars, showing direct evidence of switches between states of rotation powered radio pulsations and accretion powered X-ray pulsations, dubbed transitional pulsars. IGR~J18245--2452 is the only transitional pulsar so far to have shown a full accretion episode, reaching an X-ray luminosity of $\sim10^{37}$~erg~s$^{-1}$ permitting its discovery with INTEGRAL in 2013. In this paper, we report on a detailed analysis of the data collected with the IBIS/ISGRI and the two JEM-X monitors on-board INTEGRAL at the time of the 2013 outburst. We make use of some complementary data obtained with the instruments on-board XMM-Newton and Swift in order to perform the averaged broad-band spectral analysis of the source in the energy range 0.4 -- 250~keV. We have found that this spectrum is the hardest among the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars. We improved the ephemeris, now valid across its full outburst, and report the detection of pulsed emission up to $\sim60$ keV in both the ISGRI ($10.9 \sigma$) and Fermi/GBM ($5.9 \sigma$) bandpass. The alignment of the ISGRI and Fermi GBM 20 -- 60 keV pulse profiles are consistent at a $\sim25\ \mu$s level. We compared the pulse profiles obtained at soft X-rays with \xmm\ with the soft \gr-ray ones, and derived the pulsed fractions of the fundamental and first harmonic, as well as the time lag of the fundamental harmonic, up to $150\ \mu$s, as a function of energy. We report on a thermonuclear X-ray burst detected with \Integ, and using the properties of the previously type-I X-ray burst, we show that all these events are powered primarily by helium ignited at a depth of $y_{\rm ign} \approx 2.7\times10^8$ g cm${}^{-2}$. For such a helium burst the estimated recurrence time of $\Delta t_{\rm rec}\approx5.6$ d is in agreement with the observations.
  • During the first observing run of LIGO, two gravitational wave events and one lower-significance trigger (LVT151012) were reported by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. At the time of LVT151012, the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) was pointing at a region of the sky coincident with the high localization probability area of the event and thus permitted us to search for its electromagnetic counterpart (both prompt and afterglow emission). The imaging instruments on-board INTEGRAL (IBIS/ISGRI, IBIS/PICsIT, SPI, and the two JEM-X modules) have been exploited to attempt the detection of any electromagnetic emission associated with LVT151012 over 3 decades in energy (from 3 keV to 8 MeV). The omni-directional instruments on-board the satellite, i.e. the SPI-ACS and IBIS monitored the entire LVT151012 localization region at energies above 75 keV. We did not find any significant transient source that was spatially and/or temporally coincident with LVT151012, obtaining tight upper limits on the associated hard X-ray and $\gamma$-ray radiation. For typical spectral models, the upper limits on the fluence of the emission from any 1 s long-lasting counterpart of LVT151012 ranges from $F_{\gamma}=$3.5$\times$10$^{-8}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ (20 - 200 keV) to $F_{\gamma}$=7.1$\times$10$^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ (75 - 2000 keV), constraining the ratio of the isotropic equivalent energy released in the electromagnetic emission to the total energy of the gravitational waves: $E_{75-2000~keV}/E_{GW}<$4.4$\times$10$^{-5}$. Finally, we provide an exhaustive summary of the capabilities of all instruments on-board INTEGRAL to hunt for $\gamma$-ray counterparts of gravitational wave events, exploiting both serendipitous and pointed follow-up observations. This will serve as a reference for all future searches.
  • We present the spectral and timing analysis of the X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28 during its 2014 outburst using data collected with the X-ray satellites Swift, INTEGRAL, Chandra, and XMM-Newton. We derived, by phase-connected timing analysis of the observed pulses, an updated set of the source ephemeris. We were also able to investigate the spin-up of the X-ray pulsar as a consequence of the accretion torque during the outburst. Relating the spin-up rate and the mass accretion rate as $\dot{\nu}\propto\dot{M}^{\beta}$, we fitted the pulse phase delays obtaining a value of $\beta=0.96(3)$. Combining the results from the source spin-up frequency derivative and the flux estimation, we constrained the source distance to be between 3.4-4.1 kpc, assuming a disc viscous parameter $\alpha$ to be in the range 0.1-1. Finally, we investigated the presence of a possible spin-down torque by adding a quadratic component to the pulse phase delay model. The marginal statistical improvement of the updated model does not allow us to firmly confirm the presence of this component.
  • IGR J00291+5934 is the fastest-known accretion-powered X-ray pulsar, discovered during a transient outburst in 2004. In this paper, we report on Integral and Swift observations during the 2015 outburst, which lasts for $\sim25$ d. The source has not been observed in outburst since 2008, suggesting that the long-term accretion rate has decreased by a factor of two since discovery. The averaged broad-band (0.1 - 250 keV) persistent spectrum in 2015 is well described by a thermal Comptonization model with a column density of $N_{\rm H} \approx4\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$, a plasma temperature of $kT_{\rm e} \approx50$ keV, and a Thomson optical depth of $\tau_{\rm T}\approx1$. Pulsations at the known spin period of the source are detected in the Integral data up to the $\sim150$ keV energy band. We also report on the discovery of the first thermonuclear burst observed from IGR J00291+5934, which lasts around 7 min and occurs at a persistent emission level corresponding to roughly $1.6\%$ of the Eddington accretion rate. The properties of the burst suggest it is powered primarily by helium ignited at a depth of $y_{\rm ign}\approx1.5\times10^9$ g cm$^{-2}$ following the exhaustion by steady burning of the accreted hydrogen. The Swift/BAT data from the first $\sim20$ s of the burst provide indications of a photospheric radius expansion phase. Assuming this is the case, we infer a source distance of $d = 4.2 \pm 0.3$ kpc.
  • We report on the spectral and timing properties of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 observed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during its 2015 outburst. The source is in a hard state dominated at high energies by a comptonization of soft photons ($\sim0.9$ keV) by an electron population with kT$_e\sim30$ keV, and at lower energies by a blackbody component with kT$\sim0.5$ keV. A moderately broad, neutral Fe emission line and four narrow absorption lines are also found. By investigating the pulse phase evolution, we derived the best-fitting orbital solution for the 2015 outburst. Comparing the updated ephemeris with those of the previous outbursts, we set a $3\sigma$ confidence level interval $-6.6\times 10^{-13}$ s/s $< \dot{P}_{orb} < 6.5 \times 10^{-13}$ s/s on the orbital period derivative. Moreover, we investigated the pulse profile dependence on energy finding a peculiar behaviour of the pulse fractional amplitude and lags as a function of energy. We performed a phase-resolved spectroscopy showing that the blackbody component tracks remarkably well the pulse-profile, indicating that this component resides at the neutron star surface (hot-spot).
  • In this paper, we report on the analysis of the peculiar X-ray variability displayed by the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 in a 80 ks-long joint NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observation performed during the source outburst in 2015. The light curve of the source was characterized by a flaring-like behavior, with typical rise and decay time scales of ~120 s. The flares are accompanied by a remarkable spectral variability, with the X-ray emission being generally softer at the peak of the flares. A strong quasi periodic oscillation (QPO) is detected at ~8 mHz in the power spectrum of the source and clearly associated with the flaring-like behavior. This feature has the strongest power at soft X-rays (<3 keV). We carried out a dedicated hardness-ratio resolved spectral analysis and a QPO phase-resolved spectral analysis, together with an in-depth study of the source timing properties, to investigate the origin of this behavior. We suggest that the unusual variability of IGR J00291+5934 observed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR could be produced by an heartbeat-like mechanism, similar to that operating in black-hole X-ray binaries. The possibility that this variability, and the associated QPO, are triggered by phases of quasi-stable nuclear burning, as suggested in the literature for a number of other neutron star binaries displaying a similar behavior, cannot be solidly tested in the case of IGR J00291+5934 due to the paucity of type-I X-ray bursts observed from this source.
  • We report on the discovery of coherent pulsations at a period of 2.9 ms from the X-ray transient MAXI J0911-655 in the globular cluster NGC 2808. We observed X-ray pulsations at a frequency of $\sim339.97$ Hz in three different observations of the source performed with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during the source outburst. This newly discovered accreting millisecond pulsar is part of an ultra-compact binary system characterised by an orbital period of $44.3$ minutes and a projected semi-major axis of $\sim17.6$ lt-ms. Based on the mass function we estimate a minimum companion mass of 0.024 M$_{\odot}$, which assumes a neutron star mass of 1.4 M$_{\odot}$ and a maximum inclination angle of $75^{\circ}$ (derived from the lack of eclipses and dips in the light-curve of the source). We find that the companion star's Roche-Lobe could either be filled by a hot ($5\times 10^{6}$ K) pure helium white dwarf with a 0.028 M$_{\odot}$ mass (implying $i\simeq58^{\circ}$) or an old (>5 Gyr) brown dwarf with metallicity abundances between solar/sub-solar and mass ranging in the interval 0.065$-$0.085 M$_{\odot}$ (16 < $i$ < 21). During the outburst the broad-band energy spectra are well described by a superposition of a weak black-body component (kT$\sim$ 0.5 keV) and a hard cutoff power-law with photon index $\Gamma \sim$ 1.7 and cut-off at a temperature kT$_e\sim$ 130 keV. Up to the latest Swift-XRT observation performed on 2016 July 19 the source has been observed in outburst for almost 150 days, which makes MAXI J0911-655 the second accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar with outburst duration longer than 100 days.
  • In this paper we investigated the long-term evolution of the pulse-period in the high-mass X-ray binary LMC X-4 by taking advantage of more than 43~yrs of measurements in the X-ray domain. Our analysis revealed for the first time that the source is displaying near-periodical variations of its spin period on a time scale of roughly 6.8~yrs, making LMC X-4 one of the known binary systems showing remarkable long term spin torque reversals. We discuss different scenarios to interpret the origin of these torque reversals.
  • In this paper we report on a long multi-wavelength observational campaign of the supergiant fast X-ray transient prototype IGR J17544-2619. A 150 ks-long observation was carried out simultaneously with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR, catching the source in an initial faint X-ray state and then undergoing a bright X-ray outburst lasting about 7 ks. We studied the spectral variability during outburst and quiescence by using a thermal and bulk Comptonization model that is typically adopted to describe the X-ray spectral energy distribution of young pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries. Although the statistics of the collected X-ray data were relatively high we could neither confirm the presence of a cyclotron line in the broad-band spectrum of the source (0.5-40 keV), nor detect any of the previously reported tentative detection of the source spin period. The monitoring carried out with Swift/XRT during the same orbit of the system observed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR revealed that the source remained in a low emission state for most of the time, in agreement with the known property of all supergiant fast X-ray transients being significantly sub-luminous compared to other supergiant X-ray binaries. Optical and infrared observations were carried out for a total of a few thousands of seconds during the quiescence state of the source detected by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. The measured optical and infrared magnitudes were slightly lower than previous values reported in the literature, but compatible with the known micro-variability of supergiant stars. UV observations obtained with the UVOT telescope on-board Swift did not reveal significant changes in the magnitude of the source in this energy domain compared to previously reported values.